Appeal

Judge bangs wooden gavel on table next to folder containing documents

Students have the right to appeal the decision of the university, college, committee, or unit with which they filed a complaint.  There is an appeal process in place and outlined in college and university complaint polices.  The decision of the college/university is considered final. For MUSC units outside of the purview of the colleges and university student services (e.g., Title IX, ADA), refer to the appeal policy of that unit. 

If the student believes that due process was not followed (i.e., the student believes the rules and principles outlined in the policy were not followed), the student has the option of submitting a written appeal to the Provost.    

Refer to the Student Concerns and Complaint Policy and the specific college and university policies for more information.

Student Concerns and Complaint Policy Section III. C. 6 – 8

The complainant has the right to submit a written appeal of the decision of the committee or the individual designated by the college or university. The appeal must be made within the unit to which the complaint was submitted (e.g., College, University, Title IX, ADA) within five business days of the committee or individual designated by the college or university.

The decision of the college or university is considered a final decision; however, if the complaint believes that due process was not followed, he/she has the option of submitting a written appeal to the Provost. In the written appeal, the student must identify how due process was not followed. The complainant must provide the college or University with a copy of the written appeal to the Provost. The Provost’s finding will be communicated in writing to the student and the unit to which the complaint was submitted (e.g., College, University, Title IX, ADA).

Prospective and current students as well as the general public have the option of filing a complaint with the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education (SCCHE), Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), and federal agencies. Most external complaint processes, prior to considering a grievance, require the student to exhaust his/her options within the processes internal to the institution.