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College of Dental Medicine | Course Descriptions

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CLNDM*805. Early Clinics I. During the first year, students in small groups are given a series of planned supervised exercises and experiences in clinical, community, and laboratory settings. Relevant experiences are provided in scaling and root planning techniques, assisting techniques in pediatric dentistry and prosthodontics, prosthodontic laboratory techniques, and outreach rotations. 3.5 s.h.

CLNDM*806. Early Clinics II. A continuation of CLNDM-805 3.5 s.h.

CLNDM*810. Early Clinics III. During the second year, students continue rotations in the Early Clinic Program with the introduction of patient contact in the Maintenance/Recall rotation. Relevant experiences are provided in equipment maintenance, outreach, rubber dam technique, local anesthesia, suturing, and orthodontic model making. Students participate as dental assistants for the Pediatric and Oral Surgery Clinics. Students are introduced to the clinic procedures for oral diagnosis, dental laboratory, records room, dispensary, and orthodontics. 3 s.h.

CLNDM*811. Early Clinics IV. A continuation of CLNDM-810. 3 s.h.

CLNDM*812A. Jr Clinic Fixed Prosthodontics. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1 s.h.

CLNDM*812C. Jr Clinic Operative. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*812I. Jr Clinic Oral Diagnosis/Rad. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*812J. Jr Clinic Periodontics. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*812L. Jr Clinic Removable Pros. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*813A. Jr Clinic Fixed Prosthodontics. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 2.0 s.h.

CLNDM*813C. Jr Clinic Operative. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*813E. Jr Clinic Pediatric. Pediatric Dentistry Clinical Block Rotation. Junior students will see pediatric patients under the supervision of attending faculty. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*813I. Jr Clinic Oral Diagnosis/Rad. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*813J. Jr Clinic Periodontics. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 2.0 s.h.

CLNDM*813L. Jr Clinic Removable Pros. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 2.0 s.h.

CLNDM*814A. Jr Clinic Fixed Prosthodontics. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 2.0 s.h.

CLNDM*814B. Jr Clinic Endodontics. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*814C. Jr Clinic Operative Dent. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*814D. Jr Clinic Oral Surgery. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*814E. Jr Clinic Pediatric Dent.. Pediatric Dentistry Clinical Block Rotation. Junior students will see pediatric patients under the supervision of attending faculty. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*814G. Jr Clinic DAU. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*814I. Jr Clinic Oral Diagnosis/Rad. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*814J. Jr Clinic Periodontics. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*814K. Jr Clinic Orthodontics. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*814L. Jr Clinic Removable Pros. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 2.0 s.h.

CLNDM*815. Jr. Treatment Plan Clinic I. The Treatment Planning Clinic is interdisciplinary. Students having previously collected a medical and dental history, taken appropriate radiographs, completed mounted casts on an articulator, and completed a thorough dental and periodontal examination, will formulate at least one phased and sequenced comprehensive treatment plan. The treatment plan(s) includes possible periodontal, endodontic, oral surgery, restorative and prosthetic procedures. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*816. Jr. Treatment Plan Clinic II. The Treatment Planning Clinic is interdisciplinary. Students having previously collected a medical and dental history, taken appropriate radiographs, completed mounted casts on an articulator, and completed a thorough dental and periodontal examination, will formulate at least one phased and sequenced comprehensive treatment plan. The treatment plan(s) includes possible periodontal, endodontic, oral surgery, restorative and prosthetic procedures. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*817. Jr. Treatment Plan Clinic III. The Treatment Planning Clinic is interdisciplinary. Students having previously collected a medical and dental history, taken appropriate radiographs, completed mounted casts on an articulator, and completed a thorough dental and periodontal examination, will formulate at least one phased and sequenced comprehensive treatment plan. The treatment plan(s) includes possible periodontal, endodontic, oral surgery, restorative and prosthetic procedures. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*823. Sr. Treatment Plan Clinic I. The Treatment Planning Clinic is interdisciplinary. Students having previously collected a medical and dental history, taken appropriate radiographs, completed mounted casts on an articulator, and completed a thorough dental and periodontal examination, will formulate at least one phased and sequenced comprehensive treatment plan. The treatment plan(s) includes possible periodontal, endodontic, oral surgery, restorative and prosthetic procedures. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*824. Treatment Planning Clinic II. The Treatment Planning Clinic is interdisciplinary. Students having previoously collected a medical and dental history, taken appropriate radiographs, completed mounted casts on an articulator, and compleed a thorough dental and periodontal examination, will formulate at least one phased and sequenced comprehensive treatment plan. The treatment plan(s) includes possible periodontal, endodontic, oral surgery, restorative and prosthetic procedures. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*825. Treatment Planning Clinic III. The Treatment Planning Clinic is interdisciplinary. Students having previously collected a medical and dental history, taken appropriate radiographs, completed mounted casts on an articulator, and completed a thorough dental and periodontal examination, will formulate at least one phased and sequenced comprehensive treatment plan. The treatment plan(s) includes possible periodontal, endodontic, oral surgery, restorative and prosthetic procedures. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*830. Continued Quality Improve I. This course is a formal and structured process that involves an ongoing review of patient records to assess the appropriateness, necessity, and quality of care provided. The record review is the mechanism that facilitates this process. All assigned patient records are reviewed on a biannual basis. Jr. and Sr. students will be evaluated by record management, timeliness of care, sequence of care and recall care. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*831. Continued Quality Improve II. This course is a formal and structured process that involves an ongoing review of patient records to assess the appropriateness,necessity, and quality of care provided. The record review is the mechanism that facilitates this process. All assigned patient records are reviewed on a biannual basis. Jr. and Sr. students will be evaluated by record management, timeliness of care, sequence of care and recall care. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*832. Continued Quality Improve III. This course is a formal and structured process that involves an ongoing review of patient records to assess the appropriateness, necessity, and quality of care provided. The record review is the mechanism that facilitates this process. All assigned patient records are reviewed on a biannual basis. Jr. and Sr. students will be evaluated by record management, timeliness of care, sequence of care and recall care. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*833. Continued Quality Improve IV. This course is a formal and structured process that involves an ongoing review of patient records to assess the appropriateness, necessity, and quality of care provided. The record review is the mechanism that facilitates this process. All assigned patient records are reviewed on a biannual basis. Jr. and Sr. students will be evaluated by record management, timeliness of care, sequence of care and recall care. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*834. Cont. Quality Improvement V. This course is a formal and structured process that involves an ongoing review of patient records to assess the appropriateness, necessity, and quality of care provided. The record review is the mechanism that facilitates this process. All assigned patient records are reviewed on a biannual basis. Jr. and Sr. students will be evaluated by record management, timeliness of care, sequence of care and recall care. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*840. Medical Univ Hospital Rotation. Each senior student spends at least one week in this rotation where care of the medically compromised patient is emphasized. 1 s.h.

CLNDM*841. Hospital Rotation in Oral Surg. One week rotation in OMS Clinic. Participating in Hospital and Clinic activities. Examining and treating patients under supervision. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*845. Oral Surgery Rotation. Each senior student is assigned to the Oral Surgery Clinic for three weeks. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*850C. Sr Clinic Operative Dentistry. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*850E. Sr Clinic Pediatric Dentistry. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*850J. Sr Clinic Periodontics. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*850K. Sr Clinic Orthodontics. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*850M. Sr Clinic Removable Pros. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*850N. Sr Clinic Fixed Prosthodontic. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*851A. Sr Clinic II Fixed Pros. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 2.0 s.h.

CLNDM*851C. Sr Clinic Operative Dentistry. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*851E. Sr Clinic Pediatric Dentistry. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*851J. Sr Clinic Periodontics. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*851K. Sr Clinic Orthodontics. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*851M. Sr Clinic Removable Pros. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 2.0 s.h.

CLNDM*852B. Sr Clinic Endodontics. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*852C. Sr Clinic Operative Dentistry. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*852E. Sr Clinic Pediatric Dentistry. Pediatric Dentistry clinical block rotation senior students will see patients under the supervision of attending pediatric faculty. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*852J. Sr Clinic Periodontics. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*852K. Sr Clinic Orthodontics. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*852L. Implant Prosthodontic Clinic. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM*852M. Sr Clinic Removable Pros. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 2.0 s.h.

CLNDM*852N. Sr Clinic Fixed Prosthodontics. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 2.0 s.h.

CLNDM*855. Independent Study. Independent Study 2 s.h.

CLNDM*860. VIM Clincal Rotation. This course is a clinical rotation in General Dentistry at the volunteers in Medicine Dental Clinic at Hilton Head, SC. Students will provide clinical care to patients under direction and supervision of VIM dentists, who have clinical faculty appointments in the Department of General Dentistry - MUSC College of Dental Medicine. 1 s.h.

CLNDM*870. Extramurals. Extramural programs are offered in cooperation with the Area Health Education Center and the South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium. A series of extramural experiences are required which must total two weeks. These experiences introduce the senior to the practice of dentistry outside the University. Various rotations are available including rural areas and hospital environments (working with patients with special needs, etc.) 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*872. Oral Diagnosis Rotation. Each senior student is assigned to the Oral Diagnosis Clinic for three weeks. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*874. Oral Rehab Clin Experience I. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to develop the skills to keep them on task to comprehensively treat restorative dental patients in a clinical environment. This course will monitor the clinical activity of students in both formative and summative evaluations. These evaluations will be cumulative between the Treatment Planning, Endodontic, Implant Prosthodontic, Operative, Fixed Prosthodontic, Esthetic, CAD/CAM and Removable Prosthodontic clinics. The student will be expected to complete two oral quizzes with clinical faculty by the end. 1 s.h.

CLNDM*875. Oral Rehab Clin Experience 2. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to develop the skills to keep them on task to comprehensively treat restorative dental patients in a clinical environment. This course will monitor the clinical activity of students in both formative and summative evaluations. These evaluations will be cumulative between the Treatment Planning, Endodontic, Implant Prosthodontic, Operative, Fixed Prosthodontic, Esthetic, CAD/CAM and Removable Prosthodontic clinics. The student will be expected to complete two oral quizzes with clinical faculty by the end of the semester along with achieving the benchmark of 400 clinical hours. 1 s.h.

CLNDM*876. Oral Rehab Clin Experience 3. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to develop the skills to keep them on task to comprehensively treat restorative dental patients in a clinical environment. This course will monitor the clinical activity of students in both formative and summative evaluations. These evaluations will be cumulative between the Treatment Planning, Endodontic, Implant Prosthodontic, Operative, Fixed Prosthodontic, Esthetic, CAD/CAM and Removable Prosthodontic clinics. The student will be expected to complete two oral quizzes with clinical faculty by the end of the semester along with achieving the benchmark of 600 clinical hours. 1 s.h.

CLNDM*877. Oral Rehab Clin Experience IV. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to develop the skills to keep them on task to comprehensively treat restorative dental patients in a clinical environment. This course will monitor the clinical activity of students in both formative and summative evaluations. These evaluations will be cumulative between the Treatment Planning, Endodontic, Implant Prosthodontic, Operative, Fixed Prosthodontic, Esthetic, CAD/CAM and Removable Prosthodontic clinics. The student will be expected to complete two oral quizzes with clinical faculty by the end. 1 s.h.

CLNDM*878. Oral Rehab Clin Experience 5. The purpose of this course is to allow the student to develop the skills to keep them on task to comprehensively treat restorative dental patients in a clinical environment. This course will monitor the clinical activity of students in both formative and summative evaluations. These evaluations will be cumulative between the Treatment Planning, Endodontic, Implant Prosthodontic, Operative, Fixed Prosthodontic, Esthetic, CAD/CAM and Removable Prosthodontic clinics. The student will be expected to complete two oral quizzes with clinical faculty by the end of the semester along with achieving the benchmark of 890 clinical hours. 1 s.h.

CLNDM*880. Oral Head & Neck Cancer Clinic. This course provides clinical experience in the evaluation of patients with oral and other head and neck cancers. Participants will be exposed to patients recently treated for this disease. The participant will be exposed to the early detection, diagnosis, physical examination, treatment options and rehabilitation for oral, head, and neck cancers. A comprehensive head and neck examination will be described and a multidisciplinary treatment planning conference will allow the student a broad understanding of issues related to oral, head and neck cancer care. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*890. Orientation to Clinics. This course is designed to introduce the junior dental student to the clinic treatment areas. Patient management, support services, and clinic protocol will be emphasized. 1.5 s.h.

CLNDM*892. Senior Attendance I. This course is designed to ensure the student with a variety of clinical experiences during the senior year. The rotation also allows the student the flexibility of choosing specific clinics in which to gain expertise. Attendance can be satisfied by treating a patient, assisting with treatment of a patient, or working in one of the infection control clinics. Special clinical projects that receive prior approval by the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs are awarded attendance credit. 2 s.h.

CLNDM*893. Senior Attendance II. This course is designed to ensure the student with a variety of clinical experiences during the senior year. The rotation also allows the student the flexibility of choosing specific clinics in which to gain expertise. Attendance can be satisfied by treating a patient, assisting with treatment of a patient, or working in one of the infection control clinics. Special clinical projects that receive prior approval by the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs are awarded attendance credit. 3 s.h.

CLNDM*894. Senior Attendance III. This course is designed to ensure the student with a variety of clinical experiences during the senior year. The rotation also allows the student the flexibility of choosing specific clinics in which to gain expertise. Attendance can be satisfied by treating a patient, assisting with treatment of a patient, or working in one of the infection control clinics. Special clinical projects that receive prior approval by the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs are awarded attendance credit. 3 s.h.

CLNDM*896. Junior Attendance I. This course is designed to ensure the student with a variety of clinical experiences during their junior year. Attendance can be satisfied by treating a patient, assisting with treatment of a patient, or working in one of the infection control clinics. Special clinical projects that receive prior approval by the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs are awarded attendance credit. 2 s.h.

CLNDM*897. Junior Attendance II. This course is designed to ensure the student with a variety of clinical experiences during their junior year. Attendance can be satisfied by treating a patient, assisting with treatment of a patient, or working in one of the infection control clinics. Special clinical projects that receive prior approval by the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs are awarded attendance credit. 3 s.h.

CLNDM*898. Junior Attendance III. This course is designed to ensure the student with a variety of clinical experiences during their junior year. Attendance can be satisfied by treating a patient, assisting with treatment of a patient, or working in one of the infection control clinics. Special clinical projects that receive prior approval by the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs are awarded attendance credit. 3 s.h.

CLNDM*899. Hlth Care in Econ Deprvd Comm. Hlth Care in Econ Deprvd Comm 2 s.h.

CLNDM*901. Coastal Center Rotation. Senior students rotate to the Coastal Center Dental Clinic to provide all phases of general dentistry to the special needs population of the Coastal Center. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*903. Dental Van Carolina Access. To provide the student with an appreciation of the need for dental services to pediatric patients in the Charleston tri-county area. Increase the students ability to deliver preventive and restorative services in a mobile dental van setting. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*904. Our Lady of Mercy Outreach. To provide the student with an understanding of the need for dental services to adult patients in the John's Island area. Increase the student's ability to deliver preventive and restorative services. To provide oral health treatment in a caring, culturally sensitive, and respectful manner. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*905. Horry Georgetown Rotation. Senior students will rotate to Horry Georgetown Technical College to provide preventative and restorative services primarily for Pediatric patients on site. Adjunct faculty will supervise the students. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*981. Communicare Smiles Rotation. Two senior dental Students are assigned per week to travel to Summerton, SC on Tuesday & Thursday. Students, under the supervision of an Adjunct Faculty will provide routine & emergency dental treatment for children ages 6-18. This rotation is a partnership between the College of Dental Medicine & Communicare Smiles For A Life Time. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*997. East Cooper Community Outreach. Senior Clinical rotation to the East Cooper Community Outreach Dental Clinic to provide basic operative dentistry to adults who live in the East Cooper area. The rotation will take place on Wednesday with a morning and afternoon session. Clinical supervision will be provided by Adjunct Clinical Faculty. 0.5 s.h.

CLNDM*998. Greenville Tech Rotation. Provide comprehensive clinical experiences for senior dental students in partnership with Greenville Technical College and a coalition of dentists in the upstate. Dental care will take place at a number of venues to include; Greenville Technical DA and Hygiene Schools, federally qualified health clinics, outreach clinics, private practice offices, hospital operating rooms and a dental van. 2.5 s.h.

CRFB*601. Dental Biochemistry. An in-depth course emphasizing the basic metabolic reactions of living systems. Topics which are emphasized include, structure-function relationship of hemoglobin, myoglobin and enzymes, pH considerations, enzymatic activity and factors such as allosteric effectors and conversion of proenzymes to active enzymes, which affect enzymatic activity the biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, polysaccharides and nucleic acids. Topics which are covered in depth include pH and buffers, glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, the pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen metabolism, regulation of metabolism, the nature of genetic material and the relationship of the genetic code to protein synthesis. An introduction to genetic engineering, genetic diseases and chemotherapy is also presented. 3 s.h.

CRFB*624. Oral Immunology/Biology. Basic and clinical aspects of immunology are oriented toward oral biology with emphasis placed on salivary secretions, dental plaque, dental caries, the mucosal immune response, gingival crevicular fluid, periodontal disease and the acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Laboratory demonstrations include a variety of immunological techniques used in research and diagnostic laboratories. Students are required to report on several manuscripts which they choose from the recent dental literature in the area of oral biology and oral immunology. In addition, students share this information in small group discussions. 4 s.h.

CRFB*747. Craniofacial Biology Sem Ser. In this series, invited internal/external speakers and students will provide seminars based on their own research to members of the College of Dental Medicine. This is a great opportunity for the students to present their work in an informal setting and to receive constructive feedback on his/her studies from a large audience with different scientific backgrounds. Each graduate student will give at least one seminar yearly. Lectures will be supplemented with local as well as invited external speakers, whose research focus is on craniofacial biology. 0.5 s.h.

CRFB*800. Research Methodology. This course provides instructor in the design of research projects. Topics include selection of subjects, data collection and choice of data analysis. The course is limited to MSD candidates. 2.0 s.h.

CRFB*801. MCBP of Mineralized Tissues. This course will cover the biologic principles and cellular/molecular processes of mineralized tissue development, composition and regulation in health and disease. The objectives of this course are: 1) To further understanding of the biologic principles of mineralized tissue development, composition and regulation in health and disease. 2) To develop the ability to read and critique literature in the mineralized tissue field that pertains to craniofacial biology. 3) To achieve a high level of expertise in at least one topic area of mineralized tissues via presentation for education and peer review. 3.0 s.h.

CRFB*802. Adv Oral Micro & Immun. This course will teach microbiological and immunological concepts through in-depth study of infectious diseases. Emphasis will be placed on the major bacterial, fungal, and viral infections affecting the oral cavity and associated craniofacial structures. Course topics will focus on the pathogen, the host response to the pathogen during the normal and disease state, and strategies used to prevent or treat these diseases. Students will also be introduced to topics such as biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and the oral-systemic disease connection. Classes will include lecture and primary literature analysis. Student performance will be assessed by small group discussion, presentation of assigned paper(s), and exams. 3.0 s.h.

CRFB*835. Preventive Dentistry. This course introduces prevention through reading, lecture and discussion of the burden, associated risk factors and prevention activities of specific oral diseases. Topics include dental and periodontal diseases, human motivation and tobacco cessation. The scientific basis for prevention activities is emphasized. 1.0 s.h.

CRFB*863. Advances in Periodontal. An advanced course designed for graduate dentists interested in the immunopathology of periodontal disease. Discussion of recent papers on periodontal immunopathology, the mucosal immune response, microbial adherence to oral tissues, and immunologic, mechanisms involved in periodontal bone loss is conducted. Laboratory demonstrations are provided. prerequisites: D.M.D./D.D.S. degree and permission of instructor. 1.0 s.h.

CRFB*870. Nutrition. This course is designed to acquaint the dental student with the role of nutrition in health, specifically related to disease processes affecting the oral cavity. Emphasis will be placed on the role of diet in the prevention of oral diseases and incorporation of nutrition in dental care. 1.0 s.h.

CRFB*876. Molecular Biology. Reviews the basic concepts of molecular and cellular biology with an emphasis on providing the student with an understanding of the experimental techniques involved. Concepts introduced in lectures will be discussed in a journal review format of the current periodontal literature. Topics will cover the molecular and cellular biology of 1)the periodontum in health and disease; 2) the immune response of the periodontium in health and disease; and 3) periodontal pathogens. 2 s.h.

CRFB*900. Mentored Dental Research Proj. This course is intended for dental and Advanced Dental Education students who have little or no clinical dental research experience but have taken Introduction to Clinical Dental Research or have permission from a course director. Students will work with a chosen faculty mentor in consultation with a course director. 2.0 s.h.

CRFB*901. Intro to Clin Dental Research. This course is intended for dental and Advanced Dental Education students who have little or no clinical dental research experience. The student will develop further understanding of the components of clinical dental research and will produce a clinical dental research proposal by the end of the semester. 2.0 s.h.

CRFB*902. Biochemical Aspects/Oral Bio. The course presents core concepts of divided into four separate modules. In the first two modules, concepts and oral biological significant of extracellular matrix components and mineralized tissue components that affect the oral and craniofacial complex. In the third module, basic and translational cell and molecular biological concepts are presented related specifically to cancer biology. Finally, the forth module presents various topics that specifically relate cell and molecular concepts related to the clinical practice of dentistry including wound healing, genetic testing for periodontal disease and blood clotting. 2.0 s.h.

DIGT*700. Digital Dentistry Basics. Concepts of Comprehensive patient care with an emphasis on treatment planning. Modern restorative concepts centered on digital dentistry will be reviewed. 1.5 s.h.

DIGT*706. Digital Smile Design. Understand smile design work flow on multiple platforms. 1.0 s.h.

DPOH*801. Advanced Dental Public Health. This course is designed to prepare dental students as advocates for oral health policy and dental public health issues. It uses dental public health curriculum developed by the American Association of Public Health Dentistry(AAPHD) with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. The course is designed as an online, asynchronous course that relies on the critical thinking and self-directedness of learners. 2.0 s.h.

DPOH*802. Safety Net Practice Mngt. This course is the first of two designed to advance students' knowledge & application of business practices & leadership principles for delivering dental care to safety net populations. DPOH 802 builds on STOMA 905 in that students will demonstrate understanding of safety net models; national availability, policies governing practice, sustainable business models, & partnerships that support successful practice models. 2.0 s.h.

DPOH*803. Safety Net Dental Leadership. This course is designed to advance students' knowledge & application of business practices & leadership principles for delivering dental care to safety net populations. Students will demonstrate understanding of safety net dental practice models; policies governing practice, sustainable business models & partnerships that support successful practice models. Students will demonstrate practice management excellence in settings that include community health centers, private practices, corporate practices, public/community clinics and charitable care. 2.0 s.h.

DPOH*804. Poverty & Health Consumerism. This course provides an introduction to poverty and healthcare consumerism in an interactive online-course format. This course explores the relationship between poverty and clinical impact on population health in the United States. We will address determinants of health as it relates to healthcare consumerism and health status trajectories for the US population living in poverty. The course is intended to equip the clinical student with the patient management skills necessary to reduce the risks poverty plays in their healthcare outcomes. 3.0 s.h.

DPOH*806. Preventive Dentistry. This course introduces prevention through reading, lecture and discussion of the burden, associated risk factors and prevention activities of specific oral diseases. Topics include dental and periodontal diseases and oral cancer, human motivaiton and tobacco cessation. The scientific basis for prevention activities is emphasized. 1.0 s.h.

ENDO*811. Endodontic Technique & Ration. To expose the sophomore dental students to basic endodontic treatment skills so that as a newly graduating dentist, students will be able to: treat single rooted endodontic cases with hand and rotary instrumentation, use dental dam isolation, use proper intracanal medicaments and use prescriptive medications when indicated to attain successful treatment outcomes. 1.5 s.h.

ENDO*813. Endo Special Topics. Advanced course which expands the basic information given in ENDO-811. Special emphasis is placed on the correlation of endodontics with other disciplines. Principles to further aid the student in performing and assessing successful endodontic therapy are presented. 1.0 s.h.

ENDO*815. Basic Endodontics. To expose the sophomore dental students to the basics of endodontics, so that as a newly graduating dentist, students will be able to: perform a differential diagnosis, assess the difficulty of a case, treat pain and emergency cases, know anatomic variations of teeth, and how to effectively administer local anesthesia. 3.0 s.h.

FXPRO*801. Pre-Clinical Occlusion I. Develops an environment that allows the student to understand the function of the health stomatognathic system with major emphasis on the basic principles of mandibular movements and positions. 2.0 s.h.

FXPRO*802. Pre-Clinical Occlusion II.

FXPRO*805. Fixed Prosthodontics I. This introductory course acquaints the student with the rationale and methodology of full veneer crown preparation, provisional restorations, and laboratory methods of constructing a cast gold restoration. All course materials are available in web-based format. Prerequisite: FXPRO-801. 2.0 s.h.

FXPRO*806. Fixed Prosthodontics II. This course will emphasize tooth preparation for full veneer and partial veneer restorations. Preparations for fixed partial dentures will also be covered. Impression techniques, construction of provisional restorations, and laboratory procedures necessary for fabrication of cast restorations using the indirect technique will be presented. Discussion of Pontic design, finish line configuration, and marginal fit are also included. Prerequisite: FXPRO-805. 2.5 s.h.

FXPRO*807. Fixed Prosthodontics III. This course is a continuation of Fixed Prosthodontics II. Special emphasis is placed on preparation and fabrication of ceramometal restorations. Also included is information on all-ceramic tooth preparation and alternate ceramic systems. Prerequisite: FXPRO-806. 2.5 s.h.

FXPRO*889. Occlusion/Restor Dentistry.

GDENT*701. Preclinical Instruction. This course is designed to introduce all new post graduate students (Endo, Ortho, and Perio) to MUSC and to the James B. Edwards Dental Clinic. The preclinical Instruction course includes instruction on how the clinic operates, introduction to case documentation, and clinical review sessions. The course will include assigned readings, lectures, and peer-to-peer presentations. The course is intended to lay the foundation for the new post graduate student to successfully participate in all aspects of clinical service. 1.0 s.h.

GDENT*710. Head and Neck Anatomy Review. This course will be a basic review of head and neck anatomy formatted as: bony, muscular, vascular, lymphatic, and neuro-anatomy. It is not intended as an all inclusive and in-depth study, but as an overview of essential anatomy and concepts originally taught in pre-doctoral dental education. 0.5 credit hours

GDENT*800. Research Methodologies. This course provides instructor in the design of research projects. Topics include selection subjects, data collection and choice of date analysis. The course is limited to MSD candidates. 1.0 s.h.

GDENT*801. Teaching Methodologies. This course in teaching methods is designed to prepare faculty or prospective faculty for teaching in institutes of higher education. The course will explore a wide range of academic issues including: teaching, assessment, academic culture and policies. 1.5 s.h.

GDENT*807. Statistical Methods. This course provides a survey of descriptive and inferential statistics commonly used in biomedical research. This core course is intended for all MSD postgraduate students of the College of Dental Medicine and clinical residents of affiliated dental specialty programs. 1.5 s.h.

GDENT*834. Advanced Topics in Radiology. This course is a lecture and seminar series, designed to illuminate current technologies in radiology and the importance of interpretation acumen. Some review of fundamental topics is considered vital, such as radiation physics, radiation safety, quality assurance, legal aspects of radiology, and normal anatomical landmarks. However, the focus of this course is on advanced imaging techniques, their applications in dental specialties, and equipment and software in the market place. Case studies will also be utilized, to enhance mutual participation, discussion, and treatment strategies. There will be special emphasis on CBCT imaging. 2.0 s.h.

GDENT*861. Graduate Dental Core Lecture. This lecture course reviews advances in behavioral, clinical, and basic sciences. 2.0 s.h.

GDENT*868. Advanced Oral and Maxillofacia. An advanced graduate level seminar designed to provide dental residents with a review of the etiology, clinicopathologic features, and management of diseases of the head and neck. 2.0 s.h.

GDENT*878. Oral Medicine. This course reviews the relationships between systemic disease processes, associated risk factors, and specific dental procedures. The materials facilitate the provider's ability to appropriately modify treatment when providing comprehensive dental care for medically compromised patients. This core course is intended for all postgraduate students in the M.S.D. programs of the College of Dental Medicine and clinical residents of affiliated dental specialty programs. 1.5 s.h.

GDENT*899. Research Thesis. An opportunity to participate in and complete original scientific dental research outlined by the MUSC Masters of Science in Dentistry Research and Thesis Guidelines. 1.0 s.h.

GENDO*704. Classic Literature Review. Best evidence based literature and chapter excerpts are used to review special topics. Selected classic and current literature pertaining to the topic are identified and assigned to residents who critically evaluate the literature. (All publications pertaining to the topics are available on site.) The course is a full participation format encouraging critical thinking as the student's review articles for various topics as outlined below. The format provides sufficient time for questions to allow for students to thoroughly evaluate issues. Recall of names of landmark authors and their research content is helpful for participation in discussion.This learning approach stimulates integration of contemporary interdisciplinary principles and techniqes with original research articles. Students are required to know the material in Pathways of the Pulp and The Dental Pulp. Also, self-study guides from the ABE website are utilized. Students learn by discovering original research and gaining a historical perspective from these articles that led us to our present level of understanding. New articles are incorporated as they appear in the comtemporary portion of literature review, normally conducted by faculty review of the JOE and other journals students regularly read. Students participate with faculty in assessment of current articles which might replace or be added to a particular topic's collection of articles, with faculty ultimately making the final decision. Full discussions are required with all students expected to participate. Thorough answers are expected of endodontists by their patients and fellow professionals, so written reviews of assigned articles are encouraged. 2.0 s.h.

GENDO*705. Current Literature Review. Selected current literature sources (JOE,OOOO), JADA, DT, IEJ, Gen Dent, J Perio, Quintessence Int) are identified and assigned to residents who critically evaluate the literature. (All publications pertaining to the topics are available on site.) Residents are instructed to evaluate the statistical methods used in each article, determine the importance of each article to the body of knowledge in endodontics, determine the appropriate level of clinical evidence for each article reviewed, and list possible research projects to answer questions raise in some of the articles. The course is a full participation format encouraging critical thinking as the students review articles. The format provides sufficient time for questions to allow for students to thoroughly evaluate issues. Recall of names of landmark authors and their research content is helpful for participation in discussion. Students participate with faculty in assessment of current articles which might replace or be added to a particular topic's classic literature collection of articles, with faculty ultimately making the final decision. Full discussions are required with all students expected to participate. Thorough answers are expected of endodontists by their patients and fellow professionsls,so written reviews of assigned articles are encouraged. 1.0 s.h.

GENDO*721. Adv. Clinical Endodontics IIB. Residents are exposed to varied cases requiring different treatment modalities: Patients are treated following HIPPA guidelines. A Portfolio is maintained and reviewed quarterly, demonstrating outcomes and a comprehensive application of didactic information. 6.0 s.h.

GENDO*783. Clinical Case Review I. This course teaches the MSD student/Postgraduate student how to present their cases using the American Board of Endodontists (ABE) format and with sufficient empirical support for the treatment plan selected. Postgraduate students will learn how to do this both through experiential learning and peer modelling. Each week a case will be presented by a student to his/her peers and the instructor, with subsequent feedback. 2.0 s.h.

GENDO*784. Clinical Case Review II.. This course teaches the MSD student/Postgraduate student how to present their cases using the American Board of Endodontists (ABE) format and with sufficient empirical support for the treatment plan selected. Postgraduate students will learn how to do this both through experiential learning and peer modelling. Each week a case will be presented by a student to his/her peers and the instructor, with subsequent feedback. 2.0 s.h.

GENDO*785. Clinical Case Review III. This course teaches the MSD student/ Postgraduate student how to present their cases using the American Board of Endodontists (ABE) format and with sufficient empirical support for the treatment plan selected. Postgraduate student will learn how to do this both through experiential learning and peer modelling. Each week a case will be presented by a post graduate student to his/her peers and the instructor, with subsequent feedback. 1.0 s.h.

GENDO*786. Clinical Case Review IV. This course teaches the MSD student/Postgraduate student how to present their cases using the American Board of Endodontists (ABE) format and with sufficient empirical support for the treatment plan selected. Postgraduate students will learn how to do this both through experiential learning and peer modelling. Each week a case will be presented by a student to his/her peers and the instructor, with subsequent feedback. 2.0 s.h.

GENDO*787. Clinical Case Review V. This course teaches the MSD student/Postgraduate student how to present their cases using the American Board of Endodontists (ABE) format and with sufficient empirical support for the treatment plan selected. Postgraduate students will learn how to do this both through experiential learning and peer modelling. Each week a case will be presented by a student to his/her peers and the instructor, with subsequent feedback. 2.0 s.h.

GENDO*788. Clinical Case Review VI. This course teaches the MSD post graduate student how to present their cases to the American Board of Endodontics (ABE) format and with sufficient empirical support for the treatment plan selected. Students will learn how to do this both through experiential learning and peer modeling. Each week a case will be presented by a student to his/her peers and the instructor, with subsequent feedback. 1.0 s.h.

GENDT*801. Dental Morphology. An introduction to the morphology of human teeth (permanent and deciduous), the relationships of dental anatomy to supporting periodontal structures, and other clinical implications of dental anatomy. 3.0 s.h.

GENDT*805. Operative I and Cariology. Includes the etiology, recognition, and classification of dental caries. The principles of cavity preparation and the restoration of carious defects with silver amalgam are emphasized. 4.5 s.h.

GENDT*806. Esthetic Dentistry. The course aims to expand the senior dental students' knowledge of application of advanced materials and clinical procedures for esthetic restoration of the dentition and maxillofacial complex. Lecture topics include applications of composite material: and adhesives for esthetic restorations; ceramic restorations, maxillofacial prosthetics and an introduction to facial plastic surgery. 0.5 s.h.

GENDT*810. Advanced Dental Seminar Series. The purposes of this course are: to provide a concise and summative review of the physical, chemical, and materials science principles which govern the behavior of the materials used in restorative dentistry; teach relationships among the basic properties of materials and clinical performance of restorations; introduce current products and advanced techniques in restorative dentistry; and to teach dental students how to analyze the dental literature and synthesize a position on recent research or clinical techniques. 1.5 s.h.

GENDT*812. Patient Management. Course brings into focus some elements of the dental student's didactic training and frames it in terms the actual practice of dentistry. Some information is review while introducing new information. 1.0 s.h.

GENDT*815. Clinical Occlusion. Students will actively participate in making of alginate impressions, centric bite relation records, protrusive bite records, accurately mounting on a semi adjustable articulator, evaluating the occlusion on mounted casts, occlusal adjustment of the casts if needed, recording steps in the adjustment process, followed by group discussion on when and how to equilibrate as well as what other treatment options are available and necessary. 0.5 s.h.

GENDT*825. Comp Clinical Competency I. Full title is "Comprehensive Clinical Competency." Remediation can take 100 or more hours of faculty evaluation. This form is to modify the name of this course, previously known as Technical Assessment I, and to change the time the course is offered from Summer of D4 year to Summer D3 year. 0.5 s.h.

GENDT*826. Comp Clinical Competency II. The purpose of this course is to assess each senior dental student's competency essential to patient treatment in Endodonitcs, Fixed Prosthodontics, Operative Dentistry, and Removable Prosthodontics at the senir student level. All assessments are accomplished in the simulation laboratory and evaluated by department faculty. 0.5 s.h.

GENDT*830. Operative II. The indications for cavity preparation and manipulation of composite resin, as well as aspects of other tooth-colored materials, are covered in detail. The indications for cavity preparation and manipulation of direct and indirect gold are also covered. 4.0 s.h.

GENDT*841. Special Needs Patients Clinic. This course objectives are: 1. To enhance the student awareness of the oral health problems of individuals with Special Health Care Needs 2. To conduct oral health screenings in individuals with Special Health Care Needs, following standardized clinical protocol. 3. To assess the oral dental needs of individuals with Special Health Care Needs. 4. To formulate a dental treatment plan. 5. To recognize the urgency of a dental treatment when appropriate. 0.5 s.h.

GENDT*884. Cast Gold Inlay. This is a course which involves individual tooth restoration with cast gold and assumes a devotion to perfection. This emphasis is upon meticulous cavity preparation and handling of the necessary dental materials. 1.0 s.h.

GENDT*888. Preclinical Skills Assessment. This course is designed to assess each rising third year dental student's competency in basic restorative dentistry. It will be a written and manual assessment administered over two consecutive days during the exam week following the spring semester. 0.5 s.h.

GENDT*891. Technical Assessment I. The purpose of this course is to assess each student's competency in techniques essential to patient treatment in restorative dentistry at the junior student level. The exercise is designed and administered by faculty from academic divisions within the department and accomplished in the simulation Laboratory. 1.0 s.h.

GENDT*893. Cad Cam Veneer Technology. Information will be provided for esthetic CAD/CAM Veneer Restorations. Students will learn the indications and contraindications for veneer restorations. Students will make a veneer preparation, image the prep, and design and mill the veneer and cement it on a manikin. 0.5 s.h.

GORTH*710. Contemporary Orthodontics. A comprehensive review of Proffit's Contemporary Orthodontics, C. V. Mosby, a leading authoritative work on orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Facilitated by faculty, the format consists of pre-reading assigned chapters followed by weekly discussions of the previewed material, supplemented with additional instructional material. 2.0 s.h.

GORTH*711. Patient Records & Case Documen. In preparation for clinical management of patients, lecture and clinical exercises will introduce the orthodontic student to the basic records and documentation necessary for in-depth diagnosis and treatment planning for child, adolescent and adult patients. Each resident will gain an in-depth understanding of the records and patient documentation necessary for thorough diagnosis and treatment planning; the principles, policies and guidelines in clinical examination, photographic documentation, and model analysis; interpretation of intraoral, panoramic, and cephalometric radiographs of teeth and jaws in the primary, mixed and permanent dentitions; the rational for in-depth records documentation and informed consent for parents/guardians; and procedures and policies for billing compliance of orthodontic care to include insurance filing. The course will meet weekly during the Fall semester of the first year. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*714. Case Anal & Treatment Plan III. On a daily basis when clinic sessions are scheduled, PG students review orthodontic treatment cases with in-depth discussion of treatment issues raised with student and faculty input. Each case presentation is supported by appropriate records documentation to include complete diagnostic radiographs, diagnostic study models, tooth size-arch size analysis, clinical photography, and a thorough review of background information to ensure the careful analysis of the case presented. The interceptive, multi-phase and comprehensive orthodontic treatment plans are directed toward patients presenting the full range of malocclusions including non-extraction and extraction protocols, growth modification phases, and orthognathic surgical interventions. The treatments may involve simple interceptive appliances of both fixed and removable designs, multi-phase segmental mechanics and growth modification appliances, and/or comprehensive Edgewise approaches. The course is required and is offered in each semester. Case Analysis IIIA, IIIB and IIIC are completed by third-year postgraduate students in the fall and spring semesters respectively. Prerequisite: IIIA-completion of 712IIC; IIIB-completion of 712IIIA. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*717. Clinical Orthodontics III. Clinical Orthodontics involves supervised patient care in orthodontic management of malocclusion. The course is required and is offered in each semester of the Post-Doctoral Orthodontics Program. In addition, clinical orthodontics involves attending sessions of the MUSC Craniofacial Clinic (two per month) and providing supervised patient care in orthodontic management of malocclusion in patients with craniofacial anomalies. Clinical Orthodontics IIIA and IIIB are completed by third-year postgraduate students in the fall and spring semesters respectively. Prerequisite: IIIA-completion of 713IIC; IIIB-completion of 713IIIA 2.0 s.h.

GORTH*718. Edgewise Biomechanics I. This course involves an overview presentation of contemporary orthodontic treatment objectives and biomechanical approaches to the correction of malocclusion based on the Edgewise Straight-wire appliance. Principles and concepts of appliance design as well as the biological response of teeth, bone, and soft tissues to orthodontic forces will receive emphasis. In laboratory exercises, students are directed in fabrication of various arch-wires and/or adjunctive appliances for correction of rotations, cross bite corrections, correction of deep bite, retraction mechanisms, and other arch development techniques. The lecture and laboratory experiences support each other in addressing the various phases of Edgewise-SWA therapy such as separation, band placement/cementation, bracket/bond placement, arch-wire selection, tooth movement concepts, anchorage preparation, and adjunctive appliances. The course will meet weekly during the Fall Semester of the first year. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*719. Edgewise Biomechanics II. This course provides an in-depth presentation on contemporary orthodontic treatment concepts and strategies available to the clinician in terms of variations in appliance design and biomechanical applications. Principles and concepts of various appliance designs and the clinical strategies in applying the appliances to patient care serve as a focus discussion. Lecture and laboratory experiences take the residents through the various phases of therapy for each appliance design. Examples of appliance systems (not all inclusive) presented and discussed include: Andrew's Straight-wire System, Bioprogressive/High Torque (Ricketts), Roth System, Biodimensional (Gianelly), "Vari-Simplex" System (Alexander), Cetlin Mechanics, Semented Arches (Burstone), Common Sense Mechanics (Mulligan), Systematic Orthodontics (MBT), and Self Ligating Systems (Damon, Speed, Smart-Clip, etc.). For each system, topics include the mechanical principles of the appliance design, recommended appliance placement (separation, banding, bonding, bracket placement), phases of active tooth movement (leveling/alignment, arch length reconciliation, arch coordination, finishing), anchorage preparation, archwire selection, adjunctive appliances advocated with the appliance, vertical coordination: openbite and deepbite), finishing procedures, and retention modes. The course will meet weekly during the Fall Semester of the second year. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*720. Edgewise Biomechanics III. Each third-year student must write up and present to faculty and fellow PG students fully documented case reports of patients presenting with selection criteria that meet diagnostic and treatment considerations appropriate to ABO guidelines. This write-up must follow the established guidelines for ABO Case Reviews as to outline form and topic presentation. The Case Review requirement is assessed with full case records and progress evaluations toward the required number of case submissions. The final advanced "Case Review" course requirement is assessed in the third year of the program with case submissions due in May of the graduation year. For each case presented, the mechanical principles of the appliances utilized, the phases of active tooth movement accomplished, anchorage preparation, archwires selected, adjunctive appliance used, finishing procedures, and retention modes must be discussed as the rationale and outcomes. The course will meet weekly during the Spring Semester of the third year. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*721. Integrated Orthodontics I. This course involves an overview presentation of orthodontic treatment concepts, objectives, diagnostic procedures, and biomechanical approaches to the correction of various types of malocclusion presenting in the primary, mixed and young adolescent dentitions (i.e "growing patients"). As a conjoint course for orthodontic and pediatric dentistry residents, course materials are directed toward "early" orthodontic management of cross bite corrections, correction of deep bite and open bite malocclusions and arch development techniques in addressing tooth size and arch size discrepancies. Since a significant aspect of malocclusion problems are related to skeletal and/or functional abnormalities, an orthopedic and functional view of malocclusion diagnosis and correction will be emphasized to aid the PG student in establishing a full armamentarium of treatment options available for individual patients. The fundamental concepts established in the literature review and seminar sessions will then be used as a building block for treatment discussions related to the orthodontic and dentofacial orthopedic management of various malocclusion problems. Material is presented based on the principles and concepts of Edgewise orthodontic appliances and the straight-wire (SWA) appliance (GORTHO 718 - Edgewise Biomechanics I). the lecture and laboratory experiences support each other in addressing the various phases of Edgewise-SWA therapy such as band placement and cementation, bracket/bond placement, arch-wire selection, tooth movement concepts, anchorage preparation, and the use of multiple adjunctive appliances (e.g., lingual arches, transpalatal bars, Hyrax palatal expanders, Quad-helix appliance, mandibular lip bumpers, removable appliances, head gear). Information also builds from the concepts and interventions incorporated into the conjoint series provided to both pediatric dentistry and orthodontic PG students in Interceptive Orthodontics and Space Supervision In the Developing Occlusion (GORHO 718). The course will meet weekly during the fall(IA) and spring (IB) semesters of the first year. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*724. Cranofacial Growth & Develop. This course is designed to provide each student a solid knowledge base in the principles and processes of craniofacial growth and development. At the conclusion of the course, each resident will have an understanding of the: 1.) basic principles and concepts of human physical growth and development; 2.) factors affecting growth variance, growth timing, and rate; 3.) prenatal embryogenesis and postnatal growth and development of the craniofacial complex: 4.) nature of craniofacial osteogenesis to include growth of the cranium, nasomaxillary complex, and mandible; 5.) soft tissue facial changes; 6.) development of occlusion in terms of normative transitional patterns, changes in arch dimensions, and timing; and 7.) clinical implications of normal and abnormal facial development in terms of growth regulation and interactions. The course will meet weekly during the fall semester of the first year. 1 s.h.

GORTH*725. Appliance Construction (lab). This course utilizes a lecture and demonstration format to orient the PG student to clinical and laboratory procedures in the fabrication of supplemental appliances commonly used in orthodontic care for space management, anchorage, arch expansion, limited tooth movements, and retention. Upon completion of this technique oriented course, the PG student should have developed sufficient skills in appliance construction to fabricate removable and fixed appliances appropriate to biomechanical applications. The course provides information on the properties of orthodontic materials, banding procedures, impression techniques, preparation of working models, silver soldering, stainless steel welding, wire bending, acrylic application, polishing, cementation, adjustments, and basic rules of clinical management. The appropriate design and application of various appliances, their individual components, options in usage, and the advantages-disadvantages of each are discussed. By the end of the course each resident will have constructed a lingual holding arch, lip bumper, transpalatal holding arch, Nance appliance, Quad-helix appliance, Hyrax Palatal Expander, palatal crib habit appliance, Halterman appliance for ectopic molars, fixed palatal arch with finger-springs, and a Maxillary Hawley appliance (Ball clasps, Adams clasps, flatwire labial bow). The course will meet weekly during the fall semester of the first year. 0.5 s.h.

GORTH*726. Interceptive Ortho & Space. This course addresses concepts and techniques of orthodontic interventions to manage the developing occlusion through the primary and transitional mixed dentitions. Diagnostic and treatment planning considerations are correlated with normal developmental patterns of the transitional occlusion so that common occlusion irregularities are recognized, differentially diagnosed as the significance and complexity, and treatment planned for appropriate management. By the conclusion of the course, each student will have an in-depth knowledge of the normal developmental patterns of the occlusion, understand the concepts and techniques of orthodontic intervention to manage the developing occlusion outcomes (e.g. preventive orthodontics, interceptive orthodontics, space supervision, guidance of eruption, serial extraction), recognize and treatment plan space management considerations, and diagnose early signs of aberrations in the development of the jaws and developing dentitions and devise appropriate treatments to restore normal eruption and exfoliation patterns such as ectopic eruptions, posterior cross bites, anterior cross bites, deleterious oral habits, and incisor crowding. The course will meet weekly during the spring semester of the first year. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*727. Orthog Surg Treatment Plan I. This seminar course is designed to integrate review and case presentation information to establish supportable principles and concepts for diagnosis and treatment of skeletal problems in adult (non-growing) patients. An orthognathic surgical approach to malocclusion will greatly aid the clinician in establishing treatment options available for individual adult patients with significant skeletal discrepancy. To support the lecture topics and experiences in clinical care, the PG students in orthodontics will have conjoint case analysis sessions with Oral Surgeons and attending orthodontic faculty two sessions per month to discuss and coordinate the overall case management of orthognathic surgery cases. Topics include the principles of orthognathic surgery, mechanisms of orthognathic surgery for the maxilla and the mandible, the significance of craniofacial regions, soft tissues and function on surgical procedures and stability, diagnostic records and treatment planning procedures for orthognathic cases. The course is required and is offered in each semester of the Orthodontics Program. Orthognathic surgical conferences are completed by first-year students in the fall and spring semesters respectively. Prerequisite: IA-Admission to Post-Doctoral Orthodontics Program; IB-completion of 719IA. 0.5 s.h.

GORTH*728. Orthog Surg Treatment Plan II. This seminar course is a continuation of the first year surgical conferences. It is designed to further integrate literature and case presentation information to establish supportable principles and concepts for diagnosis and treatment of skeletal problems in adult (non-growing) patients. To support the lecture topics and experiences in clinical care, the PG students in orthodontics will have conjoint case analysis sessions with Oral Surgeons and attending orthodontic faculty two sessions per month to discuss and coordinate the overall case management of orthognathic surgery cases. The course is offered in each semester of the Orthodontics Program. Orthognathic surgical conferences are completed by second-year students in the fall and spring semesters respectively. Prerequisite: IIA-completion of 719IB, IIB-completion of 719IIA. 0.5 s.h.

GORTH*729. Orthog Surg Treatment Plan III. This seminar course is a continuation of the first and second year surgical conferences. It is designed to further integrate literature and case presentation information to establish supportable principles and concepts for diagnosis and treatment of skeletal problems in adult (non-growing) patients. To support the lecture topics and experiences in clinical care, the PG students in orthodontics will have conjoint case analysis sessions with Oral Surgeons and attending orthodontic faculty two sessions per month to discuss and coordinate the overall case management of orthognathic surgery cases. The course is offered in each semester of the Orthodontics Program. Orthognathic surgical conferences are completed by third-year students in the fall and spring semesters respectively. Prerequisite: IIIA- completion of 719IIB, IIIB-completion of 719IIIA. 0.5 s.h.

GORTH*731. Orthodontic Materials. The student is formally oriented to the clinical use of various materials utilized in orthodontic practice through a seminar series in the first year. A review of the properties of archwires used at the various stages of orthodontic treatment, bonding and cementation materials for self-curing and light curing elements of securing orthodontic appliances, and the use of elastomeric products receive special emphasis in the course. Lectures will be based on the textbook Orthodontic Materials: Scientific and Clinical Aspects, Brantley WA, Eliades T (Editors), Thieme, Stuttgart/New York(2001). A review of assigned articles on pertinent contemporary literature along with experiences in library and internet search are secondary benefits of the course. Topics covered include structures and properties of orthodontic materials, mechanics and mechanical testing, techniques for study of orthodontic materials, orthodontic wires, enamel etching and bond strength, bonding to non-conventional surfaces, orthodontic bracket materials, elastomeric ligatures and chains, principles of adhesion, orthodontic adhesive resins, cements in orthodontics, impression materials, microbiological and long-term enamel changes, principles of biocompatibility, and allergic reactions and safety concerns. The course will meet weekly during the Spring Semester of the first year. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*732. Literature Review. This course is intended to review particularly current and past dental and medical literature, as well as that of other disciplines relating to the fields of orthodontics and maxillofacial surgery. Published articles will be assigned weekly to residents for review and discussion. The purpose is to enhance residents' ability to critically assess the quality of the research and its presentation, and assimilate useful information for enhancing patient care. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*735. Interdisciplinary Care - Perio. This seminar course is designed to integrate information to establish supportable principles and concepts for diagnosis and treatment of patients requiring multi-disciplinary care involving the management of periodontal disease and/or periodontal surgery. To support the lecture topics and experiences in clinical care, the PG students will have conjoint case analysis sessions with the Periodontal residents and faculty on a need basis to discuss and coordinate the overall case management of patients. The seminar series allows the PG student to be able to address the prevalence, classification, etiological factors and treatment regimens appropriate to periodontal diseases in children, adolescents and adults, describe diagnostic and treatment challenges of the periodontium in children, adolescents and adults, discuss the classification of periodontal diseases - describe features of each classification, discuss the etiological factors of periodontal disease, discuss treatment regimens for periodontal disease in children, adolescents and adults, describe the characteristics and management of mucogingival problems (e.g. frenectomy), and describe characteristics and management of impacted teeth (e.g. uncovering, orthodontic eruption). The course will meet weekly during the Fall semester of either the second or third year of the program (offered in alternate years). 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*736. Interdiscipl Care-TMD/Restora. This seminar course is designed to integrate information to establish supportable principles and concepts for diagnosis and treatment of patients requiring multi-disciplinary care including comprehensive occlusal reconstruction (crown and bridge, implants) and those with temporomandibular dysfunction problems. To support the lecture topics and experiences in clinical care, the PG students will have conjoint case analysis sessions with prosthodontic and restorative faculty on a need basis to discuss and coordinate the overall case management of patients. In addition to the seminar series, guest lecturers recognized as experts in the areas of occlusion are brought in to provide special lectures to the residents over the course of their program curriculum. At the conclusion of this course, the PG student will be able to have in-depth knowledge in the diagnosis of temporomandibular and myofascial pain problems, understand the principles to TMD management with splint therapy patients, understand the principles of TMD management with orthodontic appliances patients, and understand the principles of TMD management with surgical interventions. The course will meet weekly during the Fall semester of either the second or third year (offered alternative years). 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*737. Dentofacial Orthopedics. This literature review and seminar course is designed to integrate information to establish supportable principles and concepts for diagnosis and treatment of skeletal problems in growing patients. Since a significant percentage of malocclusion problems are related to skeletal and/or functional abnormalities, an orthopedic and functional view of malocclusion will greatly aid the clinician in establishing treatment options available for individual patients. The topics include principles of growth modification, mechanisms of growth modification, significance of craniofacial regions, soft tissues and function, and timing of growth modification. Topics will address in-depth assessments of the biomechanical actions in the correction of growing patients with Class II malocclusions using functional appliances for Class II growth modification (activator, bionator/orthopedic corrector, Frankel functional regulator, Herbst appliance, twin-block appliance) and extr aoral forces for Class II correction (directed cervical & high-pull headgear). Treatment of Class III malocclusions with growth potential using chin cups and protraction face-masks will also be addressed. The course will meet weekly during the spring semester of either the first or second year (offered in alternative years). 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*738. Develop Anomalies & Med Condit. This seminar reviews developmental disabilities that have implications to diagnosis and treatment planning with special emphasis placed on the orthodontic management of patients with the conditions. Assigned topics will be presented by a designated PG student who must prepare and conduct an original presentation of the topic using a lecture seminar format. Each presentation must be supplemented by audiovisual support and a concise review outlining the lecture information. In order to provide each participant a future source of ready reference concerning topic areas, a typed handout is to be prepared for each condition according to a prescribed outline. Note that a bibliography of references used in preparation of the topic discussion must be provided with the typed review. Medical conditions include disease, subacute bacterial endocarditis, blood disorders (sickle cell anemia, leukemia), metabolic disorders (diabetes, immunodeficiency, arthritis), infectious disorders (tuberculosis, hepatitis) and neuromuscular disorders (cerebral palsy, spina bifida, epilepsy). Craniofacial syndromes include Treacher-Collins, Crouzon's, Pierre-Robin, cleidocranial dysostosis, ectodermal dysplasia, Down syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, cleft lip and palate. Anomalies in dental formation, exfoliation and eruption include missing teeth, extra teeth, ankylosis, ectopic eruption/impaction, amelogenesis imperfecta, Dentinogenesis Imperfecta. The course will meet weekly during the spring semester of the second year. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*739. Teaching Preceptorship A & B. The Teaching Preceptorship is designed to help students develop teaching skills in both clinical supervision and didactic lecture presentations. Third year students provide coverage for Dental Students during their appointments for orthodontic patient care. This required course is offered in fall and spring semesters when Dental Students see patients. In addition, the PG students provide lecture and seminar presentations to dental students in the orthodontic preclinical laboratory courses. Prerequisite: A- Third year status in Orthodontics PG Program; B-completion of GORTH 739A. 0.5 s.h.

GORTH*740. ABO Board Prep Review. The purpose of this class is to help 2nd and 3rd year residents review and prepare for the written component of the American Board of orthodontics (ABO) examination. PG students will have reviewed many of the articles previously in regular program seminar sessions. This class is targeted toward helping students review ABO assigned articles and texts for in-depth discussion. Requirements for class attendants are to: 1) To present a brief summary/abstract of the paper; and 2)To quiz the class with 5-10 take home message in question form of each paper. Upon completion of this course the PG student will have an improved ability to review, evaluate, criticize and determine clinical applications of the literature related to orthodontic diagnosis and treatment; have become familiar with a broad base of original literature to which past and future articles may be related in a scientific manner; have reviewed and evaluated a spectrum of research protocols, methods, and statistical designs; and will have read the American Board of Orthodontics recommended reading list. The course will meet weekly during the spring semester of the second year. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*742. Biomechanics of TADS. The goals of the course are (1)to familiarize the students with the history, evolution, design, placement, and clinical use of TADs, (2)to leave this program with an understanding of how to incorporate TADs into treatment planning, not just as a bailout mechanism but incorporation of the TADs into the treatment plan at its inception, (3) understand the difference in mechanics required when utilizing direct versus indirect anchorage, and (4) to have the clinical skills to select, place, and utilize TADs in orthodontic treatment. 1.0 s.h.

GORTH*744. Retention in Orthodontics. In additional to coverage of topics, MUSC retention patients will be evaluated for post-treatment changes as part of the resident presentation. Dr. Harrell will also present treated patients and subsequent changes in retention over a two year or more time period. 1.0 s.h.

GPERI*701. Periodontal Microbiology. A course in microbiology including basic and clinical microbiology and emphasizing the issues critical to Periodontics. 1.0 s.h.

GPERI*864. Advanced Periodontology. The first part of a four-part general core course required of all periodontics graduate students. Part I consists of an in-depth study of histology of the periodontium and of currently acceptable therapeutic procedures presented via the seminar mode. Prerequisites: D.M.D./D.D.S. degree and acceptance in the periodontics graduate program. 2.0 s.h.

MATSC*801. Dental Materials. The purpose of this course is to introduce the dental student to the various materials used in the practice of the dentistry including their composition, chemistry, properties, and applications. By gaining a better understanding of these materials, students will also be able to assess newer materials that are constantly being introduced into dentistry. Also, through hands-on laboratory exercises, students have the opportunity to manipulate and familiarize themselves with some of these materials before utilizing them in upper level courses. 2.5 s.h.

MATSC*882. Intro to Dent Biomater Researc. A brief overview of the capabilities and limitations of research techniques commonly used in laboratory investigations of biomaterials. Each student will complete a laboratory dental biomaterials research project. The course is intended for dental students and beginning dental students. 2.0 s.h.

MATSC*883. ST: Dental Materials . A study of a particular aspect of the nature and properties of a dental material. The study is conducted on an individual basis and may take the form of either a laboratory project or a literature survey. The topic selected depends on the interests of the student. Prerequisite: third-year status. 1.0 s.h.

MATSC*886. Independent Project. The purpose of this course is to provide third year dental students the experience of collecting, organizing and presenting to their peers a body of knowledge of value in modern dental practice. In the course, students select a topic based on their interest and identify a mentor to assist them in developing a table clinic presentation relative to the topic. Instruction and assistance is provided in topic and mentor selection. Information gathering and project presentation. 3.0 s.h.

MATSC*889. Advanced Dental Mat. & Lab.. An Advance course on materials used in dentistry is taught from a lecture, class discussion and laboratory exercise approach. Laboratory sessions will focus on basics of experimental design, data interpretation and other techniques. The course is intended to reinforce and augment prior knowledge on concepts of dental materials science. 1.0 s.h.

MATSC*890. Current Research Advances. An advanced course emphasizing current literature, concepts of regenerative medicine and biocompatibility issues relevant to dentistry. Course is taught from a lecture, literature review and class discussion approach. 1.0 s.h.

MATSC*891. Advanced Dental Materials. An advanced course emphasizing on the materials used in orthodontics is taught from a lecture, literature review and class discussion approach. Modern developments in materials science and their relationships to the properties of materials relevant to dentistry are reviewed. 2.0 s.h.

OHS*624. Oral Immunology-Oral Biology. This course introduces the basic and clinical concepts of immunology, with an emphasis on oral biology. Students who pass this course will understand how the immune system works in health, and how its dysfunction causes or contributes to disease. Topics covered in this course include fundamentals of adaptive and innate immunity, immune regulation, immunization, and transplantation biology and tumor immunology. Disorders such as hypersensitivity, graft rejection, graft-versus-host disease, and autoimmunity are introduced as well as the drugs used to treat these diseases. The impact of the human microbiome on health and disease is also discussed. The course grade is based on four written exams and evidence-based medicine assignment. 4.0 s.h.

OHS*715. Laboratory Rotation. This course is designed to allow students to work in the laboratories of two potential research mentors throughout the fall semester of the first year. The student will spend 7 weeks in each of two laboratories. For each laboratory rotated through, the student will be required to submit a 1-2 page summary of the research goals and activities conducted in each laboratory. The student will be required to present a poster or research talk during the fall Student Research Day offered by the College of Graduate Studies. The course will be pass/no pass and grades will be based on completion of the rotation summaries and presentation at Research Day in addition to the average evaluation of the two chosen mentors. 2.0 s.h.

OHS*717. Biology of Mineralized Tissue. This course will cover the biologic principles and cellular/molecular processes of mineralized tissue development, composition and regulation in health and disease. The objectives of this course are: 1) To further understanding of the biologic principles of mineralized tissue development, composition and regulation in health and disease. 2) To develop the ability to read and critique literature in the mineralized tissue field that pertains to craniofacial biology. 3) To achieve a high level of expertise in at least one topic of mineralized tissues via presentation for education and peer review. 3.0 s.h.

OHS*747. Oral Health Sciences Seminars. In this series, students give a seminar based on their own research to their fellow students, advisory committee, faculty and post-doctoral fellows in the College of Dental Medicine. This is a great opportunity for the students to present their work in an informal setting and to receive constructive feedback on his/her studies from a large audience with different scientific backgrounds. Each graduate student will give at least one seminar yearly. Lectures will be supplemented with local as well as invited external speakers, whose research focus is on oral health sciences. 0.5 s.h.

OHS*823. Clinical Genetics. Reviews basic genetic principles, familiarized the student with the genetic approach to human disease, and exposes the student to a variety of genetic syndromes. The student enhances their diagnostic capabilities, is late able to contribute to the management and treatment of genetically compromised patients,and learns about the likelihood of occurrence of common birth defects. 1.0 s.h.

OHS*902. Biochem Aspects of Oral Biol. The course presents core biochemical concepts pertaining to oral biology that are divided into four separate modules. In the first two modules, concepts and oral biological significance of extracellular matrix components and mineralized tissue components that affect the oral and craniofacial complex will be discussed in detail. In the third module, basic and translational cell and molecular biological concepts are presented related specifically to cancer biology. Finally, the fourth module presents selected topics that specifically relate cell and molecular biological concepts related to the clinical practice of dentistry including wound healing, genetic testing for periodontal disease, and blood clotting. 2.0 s.h.

OHS*970. Thesis Research. Thesis track students that have passed their qualifying exams will conduct the research required for completion of their thesis project in the laboratory of the chosen mentor. The course will be pass/no pass and grades will be determined by the chosen mentor based on research productivity over the course of the semester. 1.0 s.h.

OMFS*801. Oral Surgery I. A basic course in exodontia, alveoloplasty, and intra-oral surgical procedures commonly accomplished by the general practitioner. 1.5 s.h.

OMFS*805. Comp Cont of Pain/Anxiety Dent. The anatomic, physiologic, and pharmacologic aspects of local anesthesia are discussed. Techniques of administration are taught. Preanesthetic evaluation and postoperative control of pain are discussed in depth. Additionally, the inventory, prescription, legal, and moral aspects of controlled drugs are discussed. Prerequisites: anatomy, physiology, pharmacology. 1.0 s.h.

OMFS*806. Clin Pathophys of Com Med Cond. This is a self-paced, student-oriented, seminar-type course enriched by lectures to provide the dental student with knowledge and skill necessary to obtund pain and to allay anxiety and fear in the dental setting. Lectures, demonstration, visual aids, and student participation are used to emphasize the techniques of oral, intramuscular, intravenous, and inhalation sedation. Other techniques including general anesthesia and hypnosis are covered in either lecture and/or demonstration. Prerequisites: third-year student, physiology, pharmacology, CPR instruction. 0.5 s.h.

OMFS*810. Physical Diagnosis. A lecture and demonstration course presented in multidisciplinary manner by representatives from various health specialty areas and particularly stressing those activities of a physical diagnostic nature that closely involve the head and neck structures. 1.0 s.h.

OMFS*820. Oral Surgery III. Advanced oral surgery covering management of the medical patient, facial trauma, surgical orthodontics, hospital protocol, and complications of surgery. 0.5 s.h.

OMFS*885. Advanced Concepts in OMFS. This course introduces the student to more complex diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. It will include clinical application of principles related to the advanced management surgical complications, treatment of the medically compromised patient, facial trauma, surgical orthodontics and orthognathic procedures, facial reconstruction, facial cosmetics, and evaluation and treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. 1.0 s.h.

ORTHO*801. Orthodontics I. The overall objective of the orthodontic curriculum for peredoctoral dental stuents is to advance the recognition and understanding of malocclusion problems to the point that differential diagnosis and judicious management of the occlusion becomes an integral part of family practice. As the introductory course, ORTHO I concentrates on diagnostic information necessary to recognize not only malocclusion from normal occlusion; but also factors in determining the etiologic basis and relative complexity of the malocclusion problem. The information provided in ORTHO I is preparatory to subsequent course work that will concentrate on the clinical application of various treatment modalities in managing the occlusion. 2.0 s.h.

ORTHO*802. Orthodontics II. Orthodontics II is designed to enhance the student's ability to determine the etiologic basis and realative treatment complexity of common malocclusion problems presenting to the family practitioner. The course will focus on the clinical application and judicious use of various removable and fixed treatment like modalities to affect optimum arch development in the growing patient and as adjunctive procedures in the adult patient. The armamentarium of the procedures, the biomechanical principles underlying their use, and the clinical management of the active and retentive phases of treatment will be demonstrated. Building from the introductory ORTHO I course on normal growth and development and recognition of malocclusion, the information presented in ORTHO II should enhance the student's ability to make an accurate diagnosis of a malocclusion problem, incorporate orthodontic considerations into the treatment plan, initiate intervention procedures appropriate to the general practitioner; or refer the patient to a proper treatment source. 2.0 s.h.

ORTHO*805. Pre-Doctoral Ortho Elective. This elective course is intended for any third or fourth year MUSC CDM student seeking a broader understanding of orthodontics both didactically and clinically. The course is particularly suited for those students interested in pursuing an advanced speciality program in Orthodontics. The one-week experience is designed for the student to experience being an "Orthodontic resident for a week" 1.0 s.h.

PDENT*800. Pediatric Dentistry I. The Pediatric Dentistry Elective is for those senior dental students who have an interest in specializing in pediatric dentistry or a desire to enhance their knowledge of treatment for the child patient prior to graduation. Clinical experiences will include observation of behavioral guidance techniques including pharmacologic intervention and treatment under general anesthesia as well as interaction with special needs patients. Should the schedule allow, the student may deliver patient care for pre-assigned patients. The student will also participate in emergency call for the pediatric dentistry clinic Monday, Wednesday and Thursday with the option to participate in after hours call with a pediatric dentistry resident. This is a one week elective. Only one student per week would be permitted, with a maximum of 10 students per semester. 0.5 s.h.

PDENT*801. Pediatric Dentistry II. As the intermediate course,Pediatric Dentistry II, expands basic morphology, cariology, and preventative concepts into diagnosis and treatment planning for the pediatric dental patient. Restorative techniques for the primary dentition will be discussed in preparation for the Pediatric Dentistry/Orthodontics Laboratory course. Summer of the D3 Year. 1.0 s.h.

PDENT*802. Pediatric Dentistry III. In this course, Pediatric Dentistry III, emphasis is placed on the development of a therapy plan based on information derived from a medical and dental history data base and clinical and radiographic examination, as well as orienting the student to modifications in clinical techniques or approach that will aid the student in providing quality care for children. 1.0 s.h.

PDENT*804. Pediatric Dentistry Elective. The overall objective of the Pediatric Dentistry curriculum for predoctoral dental students is to provide didactic, laboratory,and clinical experiences that will offer competency in the diagnosis and treatment of common dental problems in children. The curriculum should also produce the ability to recognize and understand more complex dental problems so as to allow appropriate referral for patients whose needs require the attention of a specialist. 0.5 s.h.

PEDOR*821. Orthodontics II. The principles of orthodontic appliance, their design and clinical application and construction are demonstrated in correcting various malocclusion of the child and adult patient. 2.0 s.h.

PEDOR*825. Pediatric/Orthodontic Lab. Lab procedures in restorative care of pediatric patients with primary and young permanent dentitions. Space maintenance and minor tooth movement applications are demonstrated and constructed. Supplemental diagnostic procedures (space analysis, cephalometric analysis) are performed. 2.0 s.h.

PEDOR*830. Cephalometric Literature Rev I. Historical and contemporary review and discussion of cephalometric literature related to radiographic interpretation, diagnosis, treatment planning and biomechanics. Course meets weekly to review and discuss literature. 1.0 s.h.

PEDOR*831. Cephalometric Literatur Rev II. Historical and contemporary review and discussion of cephalometric literature related to radiographic interpretation,diagnosis, treatment planning and biomechanics. Course meets weekly to review and discuss literature. 1.0 s.h.

PEDOR*832. Cephalometric Lit. Rev III. Historical and contemporary review and discussion of cephalometric literature related to radiographic interpretation, diagnosis, treatment planning and biomechanics. Course meets weekly to review and discuss literature. 1.0 s.h.

PEDOR*889. Cephalometric Analysis. This course will provide an overview of the importance of cephalometric radiography as a diagnostic tool, in the evaluation of growth of the craniofacial complex and in treatment effects of orthodontic procedures. Several cephalometric analyses will be discussed in detail from a historical perspective. The student will have an opportunity to do various analyses with an emphasis on the interpretation of the findings. 1.0 s.h.

PEDOR*899. Pediatric Dentistry & Ortho. Students will participate in a private practice setting learning all aspects of pediatric dentistry. Direct patient care is equivalent to those of a dental assistant. Indirect patient care will consist of observation and discussion. 1.5 s.h.

PROS*810. Intro to Implant Prosthodontic. This course is designed to introduce the student to the restoration of dental implants. The student will learn the concepts of using implants in the edentulous and partially edentulous mouth. The course will introduce the student to various implant systems and restorative components. Prerequisite: completion of sophomore level fixed and removable prosthodontic courses. 1.0 s.h.

PROS*820. Implant Prosthodontics I. This course will introduce freshman student to the restoration of dental implants. The concepts for utilization of dental implants in restorative dentistry will be presented. This course will also provide basic information for the biological concepts for successful implants. 1.5 s.h.

PROS*821. Implant Prosthodontics II. This course is designed to advance the student's knowledge essential for providing mainstream implant restorative treatment. The material in this course will include basic concepts of treatment planning dental implants for the edentulous and partially edentulous patient, construction of surgical templates, hands-on surgical placement overview, impression techniques, and implant crown fabrication. This course is a participation course consisting of both lecture and laboratory sessions. 1.5 s.h.

PROS*822. Implant Prosthodontics Lec/Lab.

PROS*830. Dental Implantology. Dental Implantology has become a vital part of modern dentistry. This course is designed to teach the dental student essential information which will be utilized for comprehensive patient care. The course includes both surgical and restorative perspectives. The material will be taught by faculty and guest lecturers who have experience and expertise in the field of dental implantology. Prerequisite: Introduction to Implant Prosthodontics. 1.0 s.h.

RMPRO*811. Complete Dentures Pros I. Preclinical introduction into the basic bio-mechanical theory and dental laboratory techniques involved in complete denture construction. Laboratory course will emphasize development of manual and laboratory skills required in the treatment of the edentulous patient. Patient treatment will be simulated on a mannequin. 4.5 s.h.

RMPRO*813. Complete Dentures II. Clinical introduction into the treatment of the edentulous patient. Lectures will emphasize the clinical technique involved in each clinical appointment. Laboratory course is a continuation of RMPRO-811. Students will complete the dentures from the previous course and will learn denture repair procedures. Prerequisite: RMPRO-811. 1.5 s.h.

RMPRO*830. Implant Dentistry. Lecture course presenting a multidisciplinary approach to dental implantology with contributions from dental material science, oral and maxillofacial surgery, periodontics, and prosthodontics. 1.0 s.h.

RMPRO*835. Removable Partial Pros. This course is designed to present appropriate background material and skills necessary to provide removable partial prosthodontic treatment. Major areas covered include diagnosis, treatment planning, design, mouth preparation, work authorizations, fabrication, delivery and maintenance of removable partial dentures. Prerequisite: RMPRO-811. 3.5 s.h.

RMPRO*845. Geriatric Dentistry. This course concentrates on the aging process. Topics emphasized include cultural attitudes toward aging, normal aging, and death and dying. 0.5 s.h.

RMPRO*846. Spec Topics in Removable Pros. This elective consists of Removable Prosthodontic topic not covered in CD I & II or PRD. Post-op issues, dual path partials, single complete denture, PRD repairs, overdentures, adjunctive aids. 0.5 s.h.

STOMA*623. General & Systemic Pathology. A comprehensive overview of the general principles of pathology, etiology, cell injury, inflammation and repair,principles of infection, and disturbances of growth, presented as an introduction to a more detailed consideration of the pathology of the organ systems and oral pathology. 3.5 s.h.

STOMA*736. Introduction to Dentistry. This course is designed as an introduction to the profession of dentistry. Emphasis is placed on dental health team members, historical developments, introductory terminology, office communications, ethics and jurisprudence, dental practice acts, work ethic and patient management. Treatment room preparation, health history data collection, dental equipment identification, asepsis and disinfection, preset trays, operator positioning, basic instruments, instrument transfer, oral charting, general office routine, productivity, marketing and performance appraisals are covered. A brief introduction to dental specialties will be presented to include all aspects of dental care available to the public. The incorporation and deployment of evidence based practice paradigm will be discussed.Understand the concept of professionalism, patient confidentiality(HIPAA-Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), ethical behavior and the principles of jurisprudence. 1.5 s.h.

STOMA*800. Introduction to Oral Radiology. Lectures and demonstrations concerned with the physics involved in the production of x-rays and their interactions with matter. Also, the biological effects of ionizing radiation and the protection of patients, operators, and the environs are discussed. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*801. Introduction to Periodontology. A series of lectures in which the fundamentals of the nature of diseases of the periodontium, their etiologic backgrounds, prevention, histopathology, clinical recognition, and non-surgical treatment are covered in logical sequence. Prerequisite: STOMA-810. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*802. Periodontics I. This lecture course teaches basic dental terminology, structures of the oral cavity, principles of hand instrumentation, periodontal examination procedures, review of medical and dental histories, instrument sharpening and fundamentals of patient plaque control. 2.0 s.h.

STOMA*811. Alternative Medicine Herbals. Herbal Medicine and its effect on dentistry. Elective Course - could be 1/2 Fall Semester 6-8 weeks to introduce students to alternative therapies(Integrative Medicine) and Herbal Medicine. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*813. Infection Control. This course is designed to help create students competent to utilize standard 1C guidelines for all clinical procedures. Students upon completion of the course will be equipped to comply with local, state and federal regulations including OSHA. Information will be provided in lecture form, videos and clinical demonstrations. An emphasis would be placed on clinical demonstrations. Testing would include both written exams and clinical practicums. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*815. Advanced Occlusion.

STOMA*817. Periodontics II. A series of lectures in which the rationale, objectives and techniques of different types of periodontal surgical therapy, and principles of healing ae presented to prepare the student for clinical periodontics. Other topics include antimicrobial periodontal therapy and the relationship between periodontics and removable prosthodontics. Prerequisite STOMA 802,803. 1.5 s.h.

STOMA*818. Periodontics III. The lecture portion of this course discusses occlusal examination procedures, fabrication of an occlusal night guard, bruxism, and temporomandibular disorders. The laboratory/clinical portion involves performing a detailed occlusal examination and fabrication of an occlusal guard. Prerequisite: STOMA 802,804. 1.5 s.h.

STOMA*823. Business and Finance Mgmt..

STOMA*832. Special Teams - IP Rotation. The purpose of this elective course is to improve oral and systemic health care outcomes for patients at the Pamela Kaminsky Clinic for Adolescents and Adults with Specical Health Care Needs (SHCN). To achieve this we will use an interprofessional team approach composed of dental, occupational therapy, pharmacy, and physician's assistant (PA) students. Student teams will discuss current medical and dental health, medications, including possible side effects and oral sequelae and will discuss preventative medical and oral health care with patient and/or patient's family or caretakers, increasing their understanding of issues involved in caring for adults with SHCN. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*836. Oral Radiographic Interp. Lectures concerned with the principles and practice of radiographic interpretation, with emphasis on the recognition of normal radiographic anatomy, radiographic anomalies, and radiographic pathology. An introduction to clinical technique is also given. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*838. Oral Medicine I. Lectures and demonstrations presented in oral region structural examination, history recording and evaluation, diagnostic methods and procedures of both clinical and laboratory nature, and treatment planning and correlative application of these activities to total health care. Emphasis is placed on prevention, early disease detection, and interpretation of detected abnormalities of both local and systemic nature. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*839. Oral Pathology I. Clinically-oriented lectures placing special emphasis on neoplastic diseases of the head and the neck and on tissue changes in systemic diseases which frequently affect the oral cavity. Clinical correlation of basic principles of disease is stressed, along with methods of clinical diagnosis, radiographic interpretation, treatment methodology, and prognostic evaluation. Prerequisites: PATH-621, PATH-622. 3.0 s.h.

STOMA*840. Oral Pathology II. Continuation of STOMA-839. Prerequisite: STOMA-839. 2 s.h.

STOMA*841. Public Health. This course provides an introduction to dental public health. Lectures include current dental public health programs, problems, organizations, research, and activities and their effect on the health of population groups. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*845. Clinical Diagnostic Conference. A seminar course designed to instill a method of thought approach helpful in establishing differential and definitive diagnosis. Problem-solving cases are presented in a small group environment with student participation required. The course emphasizes radiographic interpretation, laboratory medicine, oral medicine, and early recognition of head and neck cancer. Prerequisites: STOMA-839, STOMA-840. 2.0 s.h.

STOMA*848. EBD Capstone. This 10 hour course is designed to introduce the students to evidence based dentistry in the greater context of evidence based healthcare delivery. The overarching goal is to provide students with life-long learning skills that will enable them to keep up-to-date during their expected 30-40 years of practice. We use a "just-in-time learning" approach, which is used in healthcare to deal with the flood of new information. 0.5 s.h.

STOMA*850. Sr Radiology:Advanced Topics. Updates the senior student's knowledge of dental radiology. The course includes a more thorough discussion of the material included in Radiology I and Radiology II. Advanced topics are also discussed including TMJ radiography, extra-oral radiography advanced imaging modalities and intraoral digital imaging. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*855. Advanced Treatment Planning. A seminar course in which students present actual treatment plans for critique. The effect of oral and systemic disease and prosthodontic case design on long term prognosis is emphasized. 2.5 s.h.

STOMA*873. Patient Management. This course will cover topics of patient management such as: management of the geriatric population, special considerations for women patients, special considerations for LGBTQ patients management of special needs patients, infants, children, adolescents, management of dental emergencies.

STOMA*880. Behavioral Science. Presents the basic concepts of successful patient management to the future health professional. Social consciousness and awareness relating to the health needs of the general population and its diverse groups are stressed during this early developmental study period. 2.0 s.h.

STOMA*881. Evidence Based Dentistry. This 10 hour course is designed to introduce the students to evidence based dentistry in the greater context of evidence based healthcare delivery. The overarching goal is to provide students with life-long learning skills that will enable them to keep up-to-date during their expected 30-40 years of practice. We use a "just-in=time learning" approach, which is used in healthcare to deal with the flood of new information. 0.5 s.h.

STOMA*888. Advanced Seminar II. Students attend special courses in the College of Dental Medicine covering a wide range of subjects. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*895. Forensic Dentistry.

STOMA*902. Community Outreach Education. This course will assist dental students in preparing to teach community groups about oral health promotion and disease prevention. The course will provide guidance on preparing to talk with community groups by developing an appreciation of community needs and resources. 2.0 s.h.

STOMA*903. Independent Study. Students will create a personal periodontics functioning website using Netscape Composer. They will gain an understanding of Power Point and Photo Shop software. They will develop the ability to plan, organize and develop a functioning website. 3.0 s.h.

STOMA*905. Practice Management I. This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the business and financial aspects of the dental practice. Topics include contractual considerations, cost concepts, taxes, compliance issues, accounting, marketing, personal finances, electronic medical records, risk and insurance, negotiation and resolution of disputes in practice management and Management of Human Resources. Students are introduced to various situations that they may be confronted with in their dental practice. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*906. Practice Management II. Practice Management II is the second part of the continuum from Practice Management I taught in the spring of the junior year. The course teaches the student the basic principles and philosophies of practice management. The student becomes competent through a series of practical presentations from faculty and guest lecturers. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*907. Oral Medicine II. Oral Medicine II is a preclinical didactic course that provides a broad base of information pertaining to the diagnostic process and how it relates to examination, evaluation, and treatment of the patient. Emphasis is placed on treatment planning, case presentation, interpretation of local and systemic diseases, clinical pharmacology, oral pathologic lesions, and dental therapeutics. 1.0 s.h.

STOMA*995. Advanced Implantology II.

STOMA*998. Character Driven Leadership. As a business leader in your community your character based leadership will determine your trustworthiness. Trust is built over time and can be lost in an instant. Learn how to become a success in life. 1.0 s.h.