access intranet after hours circle-arrow apply blog caret circle arrow close closer look community outreach community outreach contact contact us down arrow facebook lock solid find a provider find a clinical trial find a provider find a researcher find faculty find-a-service how to apply join leadership left arrow locations logo make a gift map location maximize minimize my chart my chart notification hp notification lp next chevron right nxt prev pay your bill play previous quality and safety refer a patient request a speaker request appointment request an appointment residents corner rss search search jobs Asset 65 submit a story idea symptom checker Arrow Circle Up twitter youtube Dino Logo External Link University Logo Color University Logo Solid Health Logo Solid Arrow Right Circle Book Calendar Date Calendar Search Date Diploma Certificate Dollar Circle Donate Envelope Graduation Cap Map Pin Map Search Phone Pills Podcast

College of Medicine | Course Descriptions

Bulletin

ANES-822J. Anes Crit Care / MSICU. This critical care rotation in the combined medical-surgical DDICU will challenge the medical student with managing complex patients with a wide variety of medical and surgical problems. To aid in the planning and administration of a sound care plan, the student will need to integrate knowledge from diverse resources (personal reading, teaching rounds, consultants, and ICU staff). The attending faculty will be from the Dept. of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine and/or the Dept. of Medicine, which exposes the student to different management styles. 2.5 s.h.

ANES-860. General Anesthesiology. The course is an introduction to general anesthetic management and encompasses the anesthetic subspecialties of pediatric, neurosurgical, cardiothoracic, obstetrical anesthesia and pain management. The student will acquire a working knowledge of commonly used anesthetic agents, techniques and airway management. Teaching includes three weekly medical student lectures in addition to attendance at resident-oriented lectures and seminars. Night call is optional but encouraged. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

ANES-862. MSICU Externship. The critical care rotation in the combined medical-surgical DDICU will challenge the medical student with managing complex patients with a wide variety of medical and surgical problems. To aid in the planning and administration of a sound care plan, the student will need to integrate knowledge from diverse resources (personal reading, teaching rounds, consultants, and ICU staff). The attending faculty will be from the Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine (majority of time) and/or the Department of Medicine, which exposes the student to different patient management styles. The student will complete a history and physical examination on their assigned patients and report their daily findings and care plan to the attending physician. Functioning much like an intern, they will be responsible for writing orders (countersigned by a physician) and managing their patients. The student will also have the opportunity to perform (or help perform) the procedures required for their patients. The student will be closely supervised. Each student will follow a maximum of 3 patients at a time. 5 s.h.

ANES-863J. Anesthesiology. This selective will allow the third year student to gain an introduction to general anesthesia management and perioperative management. The student will acquire a working knowledge of commonly used anesthetic agents, techniques and airway management. The student will work directly with one of the anesthesiologists. 2.5 s.h.

ANES-865. Pain Management. Diagnosis and treatment of acute, chronic and cancer pain patients. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

ANES-880J. Anes & Perio Med. At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Discuss cardiovascular and pulmonary physiology as applied in a variety of clinical settings and disease processes. 2. Discuss clinically applicable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics across various pharmacologic therapies. 3. Start an intravenous line and have been guided through the process of intubation, starting an arterial line, and central venous access. 4. Discuss the treatment of acute pain through various modalities, including oral, intravenous, neuraxial, and regional techniques, as well the ethics involved in the treatment of pain. 5. Communicate basic ACLS principles, with particular attention placed on airway management. 6. Demonstrate professional behavior in pre-operative encounters with patients and their families, understanding the stress and anxiety involved in this period. 2.5 s.h.

ANES-900A. Anesthesiology Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

ANES-900E. Anethesiology Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

ANES-970E. Anesthesiology Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

DERM-863. Dermatology. Students observe and participate in the management of a wide variety of dermatologic diseases. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

DERM-880J. Dermatology. At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1) Conduct a complete skin exam. 2) Establish a differential diagnosis for a cutaneous tumor. 3) Recognize common inflammatory dermatoses. 4) Determine the appropriate diagnostic procedure to provide information for a definitive diagnosis (punch biopsy vs excision vs laboratory testing). 5) Make a decision on initiation of therapy for common dermatoses. 2.5 s.h.

DERM-881J. Dermatology. Third year students may choose this selective to observe and participate in the diagnosis and management of a wide variety of common dermatological diseases seen in an outpatient dermatology practice. This is to expose primary care interested students in the concepts of dermatology commonly seen by a primary care physician. 4 s.h.

DERM-882J. Dermatology. Third year students may choose this selective to participate in the diagnosis and management of a wide variety of common dermatological diseases seen in two outpatient dermatology practices. Skin Cancer Centre (Dr. DeAngelis) is heavily involved in Mohs Surgery and Dermatologic Surgery seeing mainly adult patients.  Skin and Cancer Clinic (Dr. Quarterman) is a general dermatology practice that sees adults and pediatrics. The objective is to expose interested students in the concepts of diagnoses and treatment of dermatology problems commonly seen by a primary care physician. 2.5 s.h.

DERM-900A. Dermatology Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

DERM-900E. Dermatology Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

DERM-970E. Dermatology Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 - 10.00 s.h. Variable credit hours.

EMED-843. Wilderness Medicine. Students will learn to save lives in the wilderness while earning Advanced Wilderness Life Support (AWLS) Certification. The course uses structured didactic sessions and hands-on practical instruction in a variety of outdoor settings to teach the diagnosis and initial management of the most common wilderness injuries and illnesses. 2.5 s.h.

EMED-844. Procedural Skills Boot Camp. Simulation-based education in the fourth year of medical school has been shown to increase the student's preparedness for postgraduate training by increasing both confidence and competence. This 2 week elective course is geared towards the fourth year medical student matching in Emergency Medicine (EM). It consists of didactic sessions focusing on core EM procedures, as well as hands-on simulations designed to help achieve competence in these procedures. Sessions will be instructed by an EM faculty member and a senior EM resident, and will take place both in classrooms and the MUSC Simulation Center. 2.5 s.h.

EMED-845. Emergency Medicine. This two week course has 10 shifts in the AnMed Health Emergency Department (ED). Each shift varies from 8-9 hours for a total of at least 80 ED hours. Four shifts are in the evening ending at midnight. Student in ED will interact and learn how to perform an expeditious and focused history and physical. The student will focus on how to treat and manage multiple various illnesses and injuries. There is one 9-hour Saturday shift. Required reading from Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine Manual will be assigned during orientation which occurs on first day of the block. 2.5 s.h.

EMED-846. Medical Toxicology. Poisoning is responsible for a significant portion of Emergency Department patient presentations and toxic effects of prescribed medications can be problematic in patients presenting with other illnesses. Combining lectures, case presentations, primary article review, and bedside teaching, we will review the most common and most serious toxic exposures due to medications, drugs of abuse, plants, and envenomation, developing a  standard approach to the poisoned patient. Students will take call and see patients in the Emergency Department who have potentially toxic exposures and present these cases to the group the following day. 2.5 s.h.

EMED-852. Emergency Med Externship. The course consists of 8-hour shifts in the ER. Approximately 8-10 shifts will be offered. During each shift, the student will interact with patients, do an expeditious and focused history and physical examination. the student will learn to order diagnostic tests, discuss differential diagnosis and management options for treating various illnesses and injuries. The student will also have opportunities to learn procedural skills such as laceration repair, incision and drainage of abscesses, obtaining intravenous access and others. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

EMED-854. Emergency Ultrasound. During the four-week rotation, the student will focus on Emergency Ultrasound (EUS) skills.  They will complete a minimum of 120 scans in pertinent areas of EUS including Aorta, Biliary, Trauma, Cardiac, Renal, DVT, Soft Tissue/MSK, Thoracic, Ocular, Obstetric, and Procedural Ultrasound. There will be scheduled one on one time with EUS faculty, as well as a weekly scan review. Students will present one case at the end of their month as well as completing interactive quizzes pertinent to required reading. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

EMED-871. Tropical Medicine & Hygiene. The purpose of the course is for fourth year medical students to become proficient at diagnosis and management of tropical medicine as well as understanding public health issues in the developing world. Students will participate in didactic lectures, interactive case-based learning, microscopy of blood and stool smears, and small group sessions discussing public health issues in the developing world. 2.5 s.h.

EMED-880J. Emergency Medicine. This three week course has 12 shifts in the AnMed Health Emergency Department (ED). Each shift varies from 8-9 hours for a total of 107 ED hours. Six shifts are in the evening ending at midnight. Student will have continuity clinic at Anderson Free Clinic every other Thursday afternoon as well as didactic conferences every Friday afternoon. Student in ED will interact and learn how to perform an expeditious and focused history and physical. The student will focus on how to treat and manage multiple various illnesses and injuries. There is one 9-hour Saturday shift. Required reading from Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine Manual will be assigned during orientation which occurs on first day of the block. 2.5 s.h.

EMED-895J. Emergency Medicine. At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to: 1.  Conduct an initial assessment of a patient in the emergency department (ED) and perform stabilization techniques. 2.  Establish a differential diagnosis, and order and interpret appropriate diagnostic tests (including imaging studies) related to the differential diagnosis. 3.  Manage acutely ill and/or injured patients. 4.  Perform procedural skills (i.e., I.V access, blood drawing from femoral sticks, arterial sticks, sutures, I&Ds, wound care, fracture splinting) 5.  Participate in reading EKGs, ABG interpretation, and patient case discussions. 2.5 s.h.

EMED-900A. Emergency Medicine Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

EMED-900E. Emergency Medicine Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

EMED-970E. Emergency Medicine Research. Under the direction of one of the Emergency medicine faculty, the student will develop a small research proposal, get appropriate approvals from IRB, etc and conduct the research project.  The project should be written up in a format appropriate for submission to a journal or regional or national meeting. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

FAMMD-849. Geriatric and Long-Term Care. During this experience students will spend time in a privately run continuing care retirement community for geriatric patients and a state run facility for disabled people. The students taking this elective will gain experience not only in the care of geriatric populations but also in the knowledge of care transitions related to the post acute and long term care environment. The rotation is located at The Village at Summerville (201 W 9th North St.) and the Coastal Center (9995 Miles Jamison Rd.). Students will spend approximately half of their time in each of these settings. 5 s.h.

FAMMD-850. Family Medicine Preceptor. The students work closely with a family physician, gaining genuine experience in family practice and health care delivery. This elective should be beneficial in choosing a career in medicine for those considering family practice, and future consultants may gain an appreciation for the role of the family practitioner. 5 s.h.

FAMMD-857. Primary Care Sports Medicine. The student will be scheduled to assist with direct patient care activities with sports medicine physicians.  In addition, the student will rotate through physical therapy. Finally, the student will be expected to develop and present a morning report / noon conference on a primary care sports medicine topic. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

FAMMD-861. Family Med Rural Clerkship. The Family Medicine/Rural Clerkship fosters a strong understanding of the clinical issues in primary care and the professional role of a primary care physician.  Ambulatory care and the importance of the patient-physician relationship are emphasized. This clerkship also broadens the focus of student learning from providing care to individual patients to improving the health of defined populations. The population health perspective encompasses the ability to assess the health needs of a specific population; implement and evaluate interventions to improve the health of the population; and provide care for individual patients in the context of the culture, health status, and health needs of the populations of which that patient is a member. (Population Health Perspective Panel Report, Academic Medicine.1999;74:138). Prerequisite: successful completion of second year courses and a passing score on Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Exam. 8 s.h.

FAMMD-862. Clin Med Spirituality & Health. Readings, rounds and discussions of spirituality and health issues including how to deal with spiritual issues in practice, recent research regarding spirituality and health, and ethical considerations. 2.5 s.h.

FAMMD-863. Family Medicine Externship. This fourth-year externship will provide students with an inpatient and outpatient experience of a community family medicine physician. Students will complete two weeks as acting intern on our Audit Teaching Service, 5 nights of night float for one week (Monday-Friday) and one week at our residency outpatient practice. 5 s.h.

FAMMD-864. Underserved Medicine. How do health professionals help close the loops  in caring for their patients? Many times health  professionals are unable to meet the needs of  their patients beyond diagnosis and prescription  of medical care. However, for many patients,  especially the underserved population, their  social factors greatly affect all health  outcomes. This course exposes students to  clinical care for uninsured adult patients in our  community while simultaneously giving them an in  depth experience with community sites that help  address major social determinants of health  including food insecurity, transportation and  literacy. 2.5 s.h.

FAMMD-865. Fam Med Inpatient Externship. This elective is structured to provide the student an inpatient experience consistent with the practice of community family medicine physicians. Based on the common discharge diagnoses of the 836 admissions for fiscal year 1999, the Inpatient Service is able to provide a comprehensive educational experience for a fourth year student. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

FAMMD-875. Primary Care Sports Medicine. The fourth-year student will be scheduled to assist with direct patient care activities with sports medicine physicians at outpatient clinics as well as at athletic departments in local universities (Anderson and Clemson). The student will spend time with physical therapy as well as work with athletic trainers. The student will develop and present a primary care sports medicine topic. 5 s.h.

FAMMD-876. Teamwork/Hlthcare Disparities. The student will be the initial onsite resource  person handling patient calls, laboratory  results, and consultative notes allowing the  student to experience a supervisory role at  Anderson Free Clinic (telephone backup by Medical  Director). All decisions made by the student are  to be logged and reviewed with the AFC Director  (Dr. Nate Bradford) on the same day. Student will  serve four half days at a local HIV clinic  working with ID specialist. Exposure to homeless  individuals will be done at Mercy Center under  supervision by attending physicians/residents.  Student will work with various healthcare team  members (clinical social work, dentist, speech  therapist, and pharmacist), always under  supervision of rotating attending physicians. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

FAMMD-877. Global Medicine. The course will consist of an 8-14 day  international global medicine trip working with a  faculty member of the MUSC AnMed Health Clinical  Campus.These trips are co-sponsored with  Volunteers in Medical Missions, a 501c3  interdenominational medical ministry founded in  1986 and headquartered in Seneca, SC. The student  will focus on effective evaluation of patients to  formulate a differential diagnosis while working  with the many limitations of medical car in the  developing world. This work is mainly in rural  and remote locations. Completion of MUSC Global  Medicine forms must be done in advance. CDC  guidelines are utilized for student protection.  Travel insurance is provided by VIMM. Students  are expected to cover the cost of these trips.  AnMed Health offers $1000 scholarships to  students involved with the MUSC AnMed Health  Clinical Campus. 2.5 s.h.

FAMMD-880J. Family Medicine Inpatient. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Gather information through interview, physical examination, and laboratory / radiology studies to assess patients admitted to the hospital. 2. Use Evidence Based Medicine resources appropriately in the care of hospitalized patients.3. Recommend appropriate management for hospitalized patients. 2.5 s.h.

FAMMD-881J. Rural Medicine. A two week rotation (Monday-Friday) that provides third year students direct involvement and experience in a functioning rural practice associated with a rural family medicine residency and a solo physician rural practice. Student will work under direct supervision of a faculty or resident physician, as well as one half day learning administrative and office management expectations. Time will be spent in the office, local hospital, emergency department, Hispanic prenatal clinic and at Clemson University for clinics in colposcopy and dermatology. 2.5 s.h.

FAMMD-882J. Geriatric Medicine. This 2 week course is Monday-Friday only. The student will spend time working with a geriatrician and palliative care physicians in the hospital, nursing home, and Hospice home and inpatient facility in Anderson. Student will assist with direct patient care including admission, inpatient, and discharge activities. Common geriatric conditions (normal aging, dementia, incontinence, delirium, falls, etc.) will be seen and discussed. 2.5 s.h.

FAMMD-883J. Primary Care Sports Medicine. This three week course will be with the AnMed Health Family Medicine Residency. The student will be scheduled (Monday-Friday only) to assist with direct patient care activities with Family Medicine Sports Medicine physicians; spending time in the training rooms at Clemson and Anderson University, in the Ortho/Sports Medicine Clinic at AnMed Health Family Medicine Residency every Thursday and at Blue Ridge Orthopedic office. Exposure to ultrasound guided injections will be provided. Training will be provided by 3 primary care sports medicine attending physicians and 1-2 sports medicine fellow. 4 s.h.

FAMMD-884J. Family Medicine. This 2 week selective will expose the student to ambulatory family medicine. Office hours will be in AnMed Health Family Medicine Center from 8 am to 5 pm. The student will also be exposed to specialty clinics that are run by family physicians that include dermatology, sports medicine, prenatal, gynecology, and travel medicine. This allows students to be exposed to the diverse roles of the family physician. The student will also obtain experience in the office laboratory to gain knowledge and skills related to phlebotomy, wet prep interpretation, skin scrapings, etc. This selective should be beneficial for students considering family medicine, and future consultants may gain an appreciation for the role of the family physician. 2.5 s.h.

FAMMD-885J. General Family Medicine. The purpose of this selective is to foster student development of a strong understanding of the clinical issues and professional role of a primary care physician and to further broaden the focus of student learning from providing care to individual patients to improving the health of defined population health perspective. The perspective encompasses the ability to assess the health needs of a specific population; implement and evaluate interventions to improve the health of the population; and provide care for individual patients in the context of the culture, health status, and health needs of the populations of which that patient is a member. (Population Health Perspective Panel Report, Academic Medicine.1999;74:138). 4 s.h.

FAMMD-900A. Family Medicine Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

FAMMD-900E. Family Medicine Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

FAMMD-970E. Family Medicine Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity.  2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

LABMD-853. Laboratory Medicine. This comprehensive elective exposes students to the scope, methods, and techniques of laboratory medicine and clinical pathology as they relate to patient care. Students evaluate the use of normal values, choice of test methods, and utilization of statistical materials for determining quality control within laboratories. The students are exposed to the multidisciplinary aspects of modern laboratory medicine. They work with a variety of physicians and doctoral scientists as well as clinical laboratory personnel. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

LABMD-900A. Laboratory Medicine Elective. This is an away rotation in the Pathology department section on Laboratory medicine. Goals and objectives must be submitted and approve prior to the rotation.  The experience may be in a Chemistry, Hematology, microbiology or other suitable area of concentration. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

LABMD-900E. Laboratory Medicine Externship. The course is an opportunity for the student to work in the role of an intern in Pathology.  There should be appropriate level of supervision, but all the usual responsibilities, including call, required of an intern is this field. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

LABMD-970E. Laboratory Medicine Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MDCOR-626. Internship 101. Internship 101 is the required capstone course that occurs in the final three weeks of the M.D. program curriculum. It is designed to prepare year 4 students for the transition to internship. This course is comprised of multiple elective sessions that focus on critical knowledge and skills requisite for all interns.  A simulation activity is also required which teaches the diagnosis and management of common unstable conditions based on the student's internship match. The elective didactic sessions are designed to enhance specialty-specific education, training, and knowledge and skills in key competencies. Simulation-based procedures workshops improve learners basic and advanced procedural skills. ACLS and PALS certifications are also available during Internship 101. New sessions are added yearly based on the suggestions and feedback of previous attendees. Prerequisite: successful completion of the third and fourth year courses. 2.5 s.h.

MDCOR-702. Fundamentals of Patient 1B. The course goals of Fundamentals of Patient Care 1B are to provide students continued experience with a clinical preceptorship in a community-based physician's office, and to evolve and refine their medical interviewing and patient presentation skills, their knowledge of behavioral sciences in medical practice, and self-directed learning skills (building on knowledge and skills developed in Fundamentals of Patient Care 1A). Students are also introduced to physical diagnosis and learn how to perform a physical exam of the normal person.  Presentation:  lectures, small group discussions and standardized patient interviews, small group exercises and sessions, self-directed learning experiences. Prerequisite:  enrollment in the M.D. degree program. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-703. Fundamentals of Patient 2A. Fundamentals of Patient Care 2A consists of Physical Diagnosis and Introduction to Clinical Ethics. Physical Diagnosis builds upon students' knowledge and skills of the normal physical exam, and provides students continued experience with basic skills in developing rapport with patients, taking a detailed medical history, performing a complete physical exam, and making verbal and written presentations of medical information. Emphasis is on the practice of physical diagnosis skills on actual patients.  Presentation: lectures and small group sessions.  Introduction to Clinical Ethics provides students with the basis for identifying the major ethical problems involving patients that clinicians face most frequently in their training and future practices.  This course helps the student to understand the history of these problems, and see them as opportunities to provide optimal care for patients and families whose lives have been disrupted by illness, pain and suffering; and to use a method of case study that a) enhances planning for the optimal care of patients and prevents disruption of care by ethical problems or helps resolve a complex or novel ethical problem; and b) helps clinicians to bring major ethical considerations and principles to bear upon these issues and problems.  Presentation: small group sessions. Prerequisite:  successful completion of first year courses. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-704. Fundamentals of Patient 2B. Fundamentals of Patient Care 2B consists of Physical Diagnosis, Introduction to Clinical Reasoning/Evidence-based Medicine, and Psychopathology.  Physical Diagnosis provides students continued experience in developing rapport with patients, taking a detailed medical history, performing a complete physical exam, and making verbal and written presentations of medical information.  Emphasis is on the practice of physical diagnosis skills on actual patients. Presentation:  lectures and small group sessions.   Introduction to Clinical Reasoning/Evidence-based Medicine introduces students to skills of clinical reasoning and the model of evidence-based medicine for answering questions that arise during patient care.   Students learn the deductive reasoning process which reduces the patient's problem into a differential diagnosis.  The student learns to 1) define the patient's complaint, 2) develop a patho-physiological mechanism that explains the complaint, and 3) generate a list of probable causes for the complaint.  Basic statistical and quantitative epidemiological concepts are presented as students develop skills to critically evaluate and translate to clinical practice the medical and scientific literature.  Presentation: lectures and small group exercises.  Psychopathology provides students with an introduction to the phenomenology of the major categories of psychiatric diseases, including affective disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, substance abuse, organic mental disorders, somatoform disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, and disorders of childhood and adolescence.  For each diagnostic group, information is provided regarding the characteristic features, epidemiology, prognosis, and treatment of the disorder.  Information introduced in the course will be expanded during the Psychiatry Clerkship.  Presentation:  lecture and a small group interview. Prerequisite:  successful completion of first year courses. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-705. Fundamentals of Patient Care 3. This theme continues the Fundamentals of Patient Care emphasis from the preclinical phase of the curriculum. Students apply foundational principles of medical ethics and ethical reasoning in longitudinal discussion groups. Students complete geriatric medicine assignments in falls risk assessment and depression screening in continuity visits with their senior mentor. A Medical Delivery System curriculum enhances students understanding of the complex systems of care in the US, the changing health care delivery models, and critical patient advocacy principles. Careers in Medicine assignments assist the student in clarifying their specialty interests. Prerequisite: successful completion of the second year courses and a passing score on Step 1of the United States Medical Licensing Exam. 3 s.h.

MDCOR-706. Fundamentals of Patient Care 4. This theme continues the Fundamentals of Patient Care emphasis from years 1, 2 and 3 of the curriculum. Students apply foundational principles of medical ethics and ethical reasoning in longitudinal discussion groups. Students complete a geriatric medicine assignment in end of life care planning in one final continuity visit with their senior mentor. Careers in Medicine components assist students with professional development in their chosen specialty, application to residency programs, and preparation for interviewing. Prerequisite: successful completion of the third year courses. 3 s.h.

MDCOR-711. Clinical Skills 1. The overall longitudinal clinical skills course is an essential extension of Fundamentals of Patient Care theme didactics provided in each semester of the Pre-clerkship Phase. The Longitudinal Clinical Skills course will include small group activities, workshops, and skills labs that facilitate demonstration and assessment of necessary clinical competencies to include history taking, communication skills with patients, communication and teamwork with peers and healthcare professionals, oral presentations, clinical reasoning, physical examination, physical diagnosis, medical documentation, and professionalism. 3 s.h.

MDCOR-712. Clinical Skills 2. The overall longitudinal clinical skills course is an essential extension of Fundamentals of Patient Care theme didactics provided in each semester of the Pre-clerkship Phase. The Longitudinal Clinical Skills course will include small group activities, workshops, and skills labs that facilitate demonstration and assessment of necessary clinical competencies to include history taking, communication skills with patients, communication and teamwork with peers and healthcare professionals, oral presentations, clinical reasoning, physical examination, physical diagnosis, medical documentation, and professionalism. 3 s.h.

MDCOR-720. Foundations of Health. The overall goals of this block are to provide the essentials of medical biology and introduce the fundamentals of patient care that form the foundation of all subsequent blocks in the pre-clerkship curriculum. The block is organized into 4 themes that are taught concurrently: 1) Molecules, Metabolism and Therapeutics (MMT), 2) Structure, Function and Pathology (SFP), 3) Homeostasis, Regulation and Response (HRR), and 4) Fundamentals of Patient Care (FPC). The themes are integrated throughout the block in order to facilitate a better understanding of the relationships between biochemistry, pharmacology, molecular and cellular biology, physiology, neuroscience, anatomy, embryology and patient care. The core content in the MMT theme includes molecular structure and function of building blocks such as amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. This content lays the groundwork for basic concepts in human nutrition and for pharmacology beginning with classification of drugs and pharmacokinetic principles. The core content of SFP is focused initially on the structure and function of subcellular components of eukaryotic cells and progresses to a comprehensive study of the 4 main tissue types. Processes involved in early embryonic development are also introduced. The HRR content incorporates the fundamental mechanisms involved in cellular transport and communication, maintenance of the human genome, genetics, gene expression, cell growth and division. The FPC didactic component is centered on patient interactions by the introduction of medical interviewing and by attention on patient diversity and its impact on access and delivery of health care. This didactic component of FPC prepares the student for the small group sessions in Longitudinal Clinical Skills 1. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-722. Foundations of Disease. This block introduces the medical vocabulary and fundamental concepts of pathology, medical genetics, metabolism, pharmacology, immunology and microbial pathogenesis needed to proceed to a systems-based approach to medicine implemented in subsequent blocks. The block is organized into 4 themes that are taught concurrently; 1) Molecules, Metabolism and Therapeutics (MMT), 2) Structure, Function and Pathology (SFP), 3) Homeostasis, Regulation and Response (HRR), and 4) Fundamentals of Patient Care (FPC). Pathology fundamentals include pathophysiologic responses of cells to stress and noxious stimuli leading to cell death, reversible cell injury or adaptation, the general concepts underlying neoplasia, and immunologic hypersensitivity reactions underlying inflammatory disorders. Medical genetics concepts include analysis of inheritance patterns and genetic variation, including oncogenes and genetic changes leading to cancer. Aspects of metabolism covered are mechanisms of cellular energy generation and their byproducts, the molecular basis of aging. Pharmacology introduces the autonomic nervous system and pharmacology of adrenergic and cholinergic drugs, chemotherapy agents for the treatment of cancer, and some inhibitors of the innate immune system. The histology of the hematopoetic, vascular, and lymphoid tissues is presented in flipped classroom format, followed by the function of those tissues in the normal immune response. Microbial pathogenesis is introduced utilizing in-depth discussion of classic prototype pathogens. Lecture material across themes is complemented by small group sessions where students apply the basic science knowledge to clinical situations including: seminar tutorials on ischemia and neoplasia, a laboratory medicine lab with hands-on Point-of-Care testing and blood typing, a genetics pedigree problem solving session, patient-oriented problem solving sessions (POPS) concerning tetanus immunization and anaphylaxis. The FPC didactic component introduces established techniques for medical interviewing and counseling, cultural competency, and an orientation to interpersonal skills with aging patients. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-724. Cardiovascular Pulmonary. The overall goal of this block is to provide a strong foundation in the structure and function of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and most importantly, relate these systems to physical exams, clinical care issues, progression of disease in these systems, and established treatment of these diseases. The block is organized into 4 themes that are taught concurrently: 1) Molecules, Metabolism and Therapeutics (MMT), 2) Structure, Function and Pathology (SFP), 3) Homeostasis, Regulation and Response (HRR), and 4) Fundamentals of Patient Care (FPC). The themes are integrated throughout the block to facilitate a better understanding of the foundational physics and physiology that form the principles of the cardiac and pulmonary exam, to develop an ability to synthesize findings, and to enhance understanding of clinical terminology. Cardiovascular diseases covered will include general topics of atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease and hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, specific cardiac diseases, and lipid disorders. Pulmonary diseases covered will include respiratory infections, lung diseases including obstructive/restrictive processes, pulmonary hypertension, and lung/pleural based tumors. In addition, this block will provide the basic underpinnings of lipid metabolism and the foundations of hypercholesterolemia. There will be deliberate integration with respect to the Structure and Function and the Fundamentals of Patient Care didactic material in this block to support small group sessions in Longitudinal Clinical Skills 1. Specific important activities include using the simulation Laboratory for an ECG practicum, a pulmonary function practicum, a congenital heart lab, and a heart sounds practicum. Integrated lectures on exercise and cardiopulmonary physiology will focus on cardiac rehabilitation/wellness. This block will culminate with each small group providing a summary of important concepts presented during this block, and most importantly relate all of these concepts back to a relevant cardiovascular disease - in this case, heart failure. 10 s.h.

MDCOR-726. Renal Acid/Base. The overall goal of this block is to provide a clinically relevant foundation in the structure and function of the kidney and associated components of the urinary system. The block is organized into 4 themes that are taught concurrently: 1) Molecules, Metabolism and Therapeutics (MMT), 2) Structure, Function and Pathology (SFP), 3) Homeostasis, Regulation and Response (HRR), and 4) Fundamentals of Patient Care (FPC). The block begins with the anatomy of the anterior and posterior abdominal walls and the structural components that form the inguinal canal. A comprehensive exploration of renal structure and function is provided by detailed studies of the nephron and collecting tubules at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. The block underscores the concept of integration of kidney function with the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems to regulate blood pressure and maintain fluid and acid/base balance via compensatory mechanisms. Associated disorders that affect fluid and acid/base balance are evaluated using clinically oriented cases, problem solving and workshops. In addition, this block explores pathologies of renal system such as urinary tract infections, kidney stones, glomerular diseases and kidney tumors. Principles underlying pharmacologic therapies are also examined, particularly blood pressure medications that target the reninangiotensin system or function as diuretics by targeting the nephron. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-728. Gastrointestinal. The overall goal of this block is to provide a strong foundation in the structure and function of the gastrointestinal system, in relation to human development, health and disease. The block is organized into 4 themes that are taught concurrently: 1) Molecules, Metabolism and Therapeutics (MMT), 2) Structure, Function and Pathology (SFP), 3) Homeostasis, Regulation and Response (HRR), and 4) Fundamentals of Patient Care (FPC). The themes are integrated throughout the block in order to facilitate a better foundational understanding of the oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines, liver, gallbladder, and exocrine pancreas. The anatomy, histology, physiology, development, and biochemical processes related to this system are discussed. Emphasis is also placed on how the normal function of this system is intricately tied to the proper functioning of other organ systems such as cardiovascular, endocrine and nervous systems. In addition, the block covers various pathophysiological conditions related to this system, pertinent enteric pathogens, relevant diagnostic tools and abdominal imaging techniques, and treatment strategies for various gastrointestinal disorders. Moreover, a nutritional component is incorporated into this block to provide the underpinnings of basic nutrition, obesity, and the dietary requirements/management necessary for the proper nutrition care of patients. The FPC didactic component is centered alcohol-related substance use disorder management, abdominal exam techniques and physical exam procedures related to diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders to prepare the student for small group sessions in Longitudinal Clinical Skills 2. 9 s.h.

MDCOR-730. UG Endocrine Male Health. The overall goal of this block is to provide a strong and clinically relevant foundation in the structure and function of organs comprising the male and female reproductive and endocrine function in healthy individuals with focus on male health issues. The block is organized into 4 themes that are taught concurrently: 1) Molecules, Metabolism and Therapeutics (MMT), 2) Structure, Function and Pathology (SFP), 3) Homeostasis, Regulation and Response (HRR), and 4) Fundamentals of Patient Care (FPC). The 4 themes are integrated to extend basic knowledge of molecular, cellular, and organ structure and function to a system whereby common undifferentiated tissue will, under the influence of sex chromosomes, take two unique pathways to the male or female form. Thematic content includes the embryology and development of urogenital and reproductive organs through infancy, puberty, adulthood and in the female, pregnancy. The process of gametogenesis including the molecular mechanisms that generate genetic diversity is examined along with the occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities. The FPC didactic component of the block prepares students to acquire knowledge that supports demonstration of practical skills in the Longitudinal Clinical Skills 2, specifically in pelvic examinations and physical diagnosis using standardized patients and simulators in the SIM center. Human sexual behavior and urinary tract function are examined while students extend interviewing skills by taking a sexual history in small groups. Subsequently, the focus of the block shifts to pathologies of the urinary tract, reproductive system and endocrine organs, including those related to pregnancy and abnormal function of the pituitary, thyroid and adrenal glands. Topics such as pathogens associated with infections of the genitourinary tract and sexually transmitted diseases are examined in detail along with pharmacological therapies. Emerging technologies are addressed in this block including assisted reproductive technologies, robotic surgery, genetic testing, public health screening and gene therapy. 7 s.h.

MDCOR-800. CIM: Clinical/Research. During this rotation, students will be participating in clinical and research activities. Students will have the opportunity to work with basic science and clinical science faculty on a research project and engage in clinical work during the summer between years 1 and 2 of medical school.   The purpose of the course is to give students research and clinical exposure to help further develop career and specialty interests. The course will be a one-credit course (not applied towards degree requirements). Clinical experiences may cross specialties and departments.   At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to do the following: -                Describe the care of patients in a variety of medical specialties - Evaluate their own personal interests in a variety of medical specialties for the purpose of career exploration -         Apply patient interview and evaluation skills from the Fundamentals of Patient Care Course in preparation for future clinical rotations -             Describe the principles of study design, development, and implementation (e.g. IRB, proposals and hypotheses, subject recruitment, and data collection).   -        Apply clinical and/or basic science knowledge and skills in a research setting -                Evaluate their own personal interest in research for the purpose of career exploration. 1 s.h.

MDCOR-821. Homeostasis and Regulation B. Homeostasis and Regulation explores the ways in which the human body maintains and protects itself including genetic, nervous system, and hormonal control mechanisms.  Emphasis is on 1) how genetics creates cells and organs and ways they can go wrong, 2) how local neuronal control regulates blood flow and organ function with central nervous system overlay, 3) how the endocrine system regulates and modifies various function of the human body.  Each is taught in conjunction with the structural and functional units of the body from cellular to gross aspects.  Prerequisite: enrollment in the M.D. degree program. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-822. Food and Fuel A. The focus of this portion of the first year curriculum is how the body acquires, makes and utilizes fuel to support the essential functions of the human body.  Food ingestion, absorption and metabolism as well as generation of essential elements of cellular function such as NADPH, glucose and oxygen are central to this portion of the first year curriculum.  Prerequisite: enrollment in the M.D. degree program. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-823B. Molecules and Energetics B. The focus of this portion of the first year curriculum is how the body acquires, makes and utilizes fuel to support the essential functions of the human body.  Food ingestion, absorption and metabolism as well as generation of essential elements of cellular function such as NADPH, glucose and oxygen are central to this portion of the first year curriculum.  Prerequisite: enrollment in the M.D. degree program. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-825. Structure and Function B. The goals of Structure and Function are to provide a sound understanding of the structure and function of the human body.  This year-long course teaches the gross to sub-cellular structural elements of the human body through cadaveric dissection, medical imaging, and electronic images.  The function is overlaid on the structural elements by lecture, problem sets, simulations and group exercises.  All elements are interwoven with the Homeostasis and Regulation, Food and Fuel and Fundamentals of Patient Care courses which run concurrently.  Prerequisite: enrollment in the M.D. degree program. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-826. Pathogens and Host Defense A. This theme introduces the basic concepts of molecular and medical microbiology and modern basic immunology and applies those concepts to the understanding of human diseases. Lectures on clinical immunology and infectious diseases are integrated with a variety of small group activities designed to stimulate the development of clinical problem-solving and self-education skills. The course emphasizes the importance of basic science information in understanding the mechanisms of immunological and infectious diseases and applying that understanding to their diagnosis and management. Presentation: lectures, small group exercises, computer-based instruction, and problem-based learning. Prerequisite: successful completion of first year courses. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-827. Pathogens and Host Defense B. This theme introduces the basic concepts of molecular and medical microbiology and modern basic immunology and applies those concepts to the understanding of human diseases. Lectures on clinical immunology and infectious diseases are integrated with a variety of small group activities designed to stimulate the development of clinical problem-solving and self-education skills. The course emphasizes the importance of basic science information in understanding the mechanisms of immunological and infectious diseases and applying that understanding to their diagnosis and management. Presentation: lectures, small group exercises, computer-based instruction, and problem-based learning. Prerequisite: successful completion of first year courses. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-828. Altered Structure & Function a. Altered Structure and Function A is a theme designed to provide insight into the altered molecular, genetic, and biochemical processes, disturbed physiological, and resulting morphologic changes that occur at the subcellular and cellular level within tissues of the body during various disease states. The initial portion of the theme emphasizes general concepts. The theme then transitions into the application of the general concepts to systems-based disease, to include skin lesions, hematologic diseases, and bleeding disorders. The theme complements the material presented in the concurrent COM2 themes of Pathogens and Host Defense, Pharmacotherapeutics and Nutrition, and Fundamentals of Patient Care. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-829. Altered Structure & Function B. Altered Structure and Function B is a theme that builds on the material presented in Altered Structure and Function A, with the application of foundation knowledge to systems-based diseases, including renal, cardiopulmonary, neurologic, endocrine, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, and reproductive disorders. Incorporated into the study of the altered physiology and morphologic changes encountered in disease processes is the efficient use of the clinical laboratory in patient diagnosis and monitoring through the understanding of test methods, selection, and significance. The theme complements the material presented in the concurrent COM2 themes of Pathogens and Host Defense, Pharmacotherapeutics and Nutrition, and Fundamentals of Patient Care. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-830. Pharmacotherape & Nutrition A. The goal of the Pharmacotherapeutics and Nutrition Theme is to provide the student with a foundation to understand the use of non-interventional approaches in the treatment of disease.  It concentrates on providing a scientific basis for rational therapeutics.  The theme emphasizes development in the student of an appreciation of the risk/benefit ratio in the therapeutic use of drugs based upon an understanding of their mechanism of action for beneficial effects versus their predictable, alternative or unpredictable adverse reactions.  This theme relies upon a firm understanding of basic human biology as developed in the first year.  It is integrated with the other components of the second year curriculum and contributes to and builds on a developing understanding of pathophysiology.  The ultimate goal of the theme is to provide the foundation for a systematic transition to the use of drugs in the clinical setting in a way that is optimal for the further intellectual development of the student in the third and fourth years.   The fall semester begins with the development of an understanding of the general principles of drug action including pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, toxicology and pharmacogenetics. This is followed with an overview of representative drug classes whose safe and rational use depends on an understanding of their broad actions and use in many different clinical settings.  These include drugs affecting the autonomic nervous system and the prostaglandin/ leukotriene cascades.  Other topics are then integrated with those being covered in the Altered Structure and Function and Pathogens and Host Defense Themes.   The spring semester is integrated with the other Themes to cover drug classes with primary uses in the context of specific disease processes or functional systems.  These include drugs used to treat renal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological, psychiatric, endocrine, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal and reproductive disorders or settings.  The material concentrates on developing an understanding of the mechanism of drug action in the context of pathophysiology, along with the limitations and management of therapy because of adverse drug reactions.  The goal is to optimally position the student to study the use of these drugs in a clinical setting in the third and fourth years.  This semester will end by covering therapeutic topics requiring a broad understanding of pharmacology and/or pathology; including cancer chemotherapy, geriatric pharmacology, drug testing, applications of pharmacogenetics, interactions of drugs with herbal supplements, and treatment of specific poisoning situations. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-831. Pharmacotherape & Nutrition B. The goal of the Pharmacotherapeutics and Nutrition Theme is to provide the student with a foundation to understand the use of non-interventional approaches in the treatment of disease.  It concentrates on providing a scientific basis for rational therapeutics.  The theme emphasizes development in the student of an appreciation of the risk/benefit ratio in the therapeutic use of drugs based upon an understanding of their mechanism of action for beneficial effects versus their predictable, alternative or unpredictable adverse reactions.  This theme relies upon a firm understanding of basic human biology as developed in the first year.  It is integrated with the other components of the second year curriculum and contributes to and builds on a developing understanding of pathophysiology.  The ultimate goal of the theme is to provide the foundation for a systematic transition to the use of drugs in the clinical setting in a way that is optimal for the further intellectual development of the student in the third and fourth years.   The fall semester begins with the development of an understanding of the general principles of drug action including pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, toxicology and pharmacogenetics. This is followed with an overview of representative drug classes whose safe and rational use depends on an understanding of their broad actions and use in many different clinical settings.  These include drugs affecting the autonomic nervous system and the prostaglandin/ leukotriene cascades.  Other topics are then integrated with those being covered in the Altered Structure and Function and Pathogens and Host Defense Themes.   The spring semester is integrated with the other Themes to cover drug classes with primary uses in the context of specific disease processes or functional systems.  These include drugs used to treat renal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological, psychiatric, endocrine, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal and reproductive disorders or settings.  The material concentrates on developing an understanding of the mechanism of drug action in the context of pathophysiology, along with the limitations and management of therapy because of adverse drug reactions.  The goal is to optimally position the student to study the use of these drugs in a clinical setting in the third and fourth years.  This semester will end by covering therapeutic topics requiring a broad understanding of pharmacology and/or pathology; including cancer chemotherapy, geriatric pharmacology, drug testing, applications of pharmacogenetics, interactions of drugs with herbal supplements, and treatment of specific poisoning situations. 8 s.h.

MDCOR-841. Developing Scholarly Skills. In this four week elective, students will work closely with a faculty mentor to develop an educational experience that further develops the skills necessary to engage in scholarly work in medicine. Examples of scholarly work include conducting a literature review and producing a written summary, creating curricular content for a course, writing a textbook chapter, creating online content for medical education, evaluating a program or curriculum, designing a QI project, etc.  Each student is expected to design a meaningful educational experience with their mentor and work independently under the mentor's supervision during the elective month. Each student will be expected to meet at least twice with their mentor to review their progress and to submit a work product, as specified during course application, to both the mentor and Dean's Office at the conclusion of the elective.  Students must apply for this course at least 30 days prior to the beginning of the rotation. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-845. Med Missions/ Intl Health Elec. This course is designed to foster students' cultural competency in medicine skills through medical mission experiences. Course credit: 5 credits for a month long trip; 2.5 credits for trips less than one month in duration. Students can take this course only once for credit. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MDCOR-846. Global Health - Nicaragua. This course is a four- week clinical elective at the PMI Nicaragua Medical Center in El-Viejo, Nicaragua sponsored by the Palmetto Medical Initiative. Clinical Setting: Monday through Friday clinical shifts of 8 hours (9 AM - 5 PM) in the outpatient, urgent care and emergency medicine settings in El-Viejo, Nicaragua as well as the Emergency Department of the University Medical Center in Leon, Nicaragua. Students will also have the opportunity to shadow physicians in Chinandega, Nicaragua. Optional 8 AM-12 PM shifts available on Saturdays as well. During each shift, the student will interact with patients and learn how to perform a focused H&P. The student will focus on how to order appropriate diagnostic tests and formulate a differential diagnosis while adapting to the many limitations encountered in medical care in the developing world. The student will work closely with the attending on duty and learn how to treat and manage various illnesses and injuries including tropical diseases. Furthermore, the student will have the opportunity to participate in laboratory diagnostics as well as ultrasound performance and interpretation. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-847. Uganda - Clinical Health. The course consists of 18 eight-hour shifts at the Palmetto Medical Initiative (PMI) Masindi-Kitara Medical Center (MKMC) in Masindi, Uganda.  During each shift, the student will interact with patients and learn how to perform a focused H&P. The student will focus on how to order appropriate diagnostic tests and formulate a differential diagnosis while focusing on the many limitations of medical care in the developing world. The student will work closely with the attending on duty and learn how to treat and manage many various illnesses and injuries including tropical diseases. The MKMC Medical Center in Uganda operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and sees over 2000 patients a month on average.  The student will have the opportunity to work in Emergency and Urgent care, inpatient care, outpatient clinical care, OB/GYN care, and surgical care.  Furthermore, the student will have the opportunity to participate in laboratory diagnostics as well as ultrasound performance and interpretation.  If the rotation falls during one of four PMI short-term mission teams to Uganda, the student will have the opportunity to join the team in remote mobile clinic locations. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-848. Uganda - Public Health. The MUSC College of Medicine Global Public Health Rotation is structured to give students a broad-based experience in development, organization, and implementation of Public Health Initiatives in the setting of the developing world.  The student will become an integral part of the Public Health team at the Masindi-Kitara Medical Center (MKMC) in Masindi, Uganda, and will participate in public health community outreach as well as public health teaching and training within the medical center that serves a population of over 600,000 people.  The student will work closely with the current and future United States Peace Corps Members stationed at the medical center as well as participate in new public health opportunities through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Diagnostic and Public Health Center being constructed currently at MKMC.  The student will also have the opportunity to participate in ongoing public health research as well as craft new research opportunities in both a public health and clinical setting (optional).  Furthermore, should the rotation fall on one of the four annual Palmetto Medical Initiative (PMI) short-term mission weeks, the student may participate in remote mobile outreach clinics as well where they will have a specific pre-determined public health agenda and focus. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-849. Global Health - Tanzania. This course is a four-week clinical elective in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and designed for fourth-year medical students with a genuine interest in global health and in caring for underserved populations.  This rotation will expose the student to 1) medical care at a national hospital (Muhimbili National Hospital) in a developing country which has recently invested in an advanced cardiac center and 2) participation in a rural outreach clinic where MUSC and Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (the national university) have an active, NIH-funded field research site focused on large-scale community-based prevention and care programs, including integration of screening for non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension with HIV testing, coupled-based HIV treatment, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-uninfected clients coupled with HIV-infected partners, home-based monitoring for diabetes and hypertension, development of a low-cost locally produced glucometer, studies of the prevalence and predictors of non-communicable diseases (diabetes, hypertension, CKD), tailored counseling and testing for HIV based on risk profile, home-based HIV self-testing, and an incentive-based program to encourage sexual partners of HIV-infected and high risk patients to seek HIV testing.    The primary focus will be on teaching the student to rely on clinical skills and judgment in addition to technology available in that setting. Students will participate in all aspects of care of medical patients at Muhimbili National Hospital. This will include daily inpatient ward rounds, outpatient clinics, ICU, and emergency room management of medical patients.  There will be hospital-wide didactic teaching sessions involving attendings and students, didactic conferences, case presentations and interactive sessions with attendings.  Students will be exposed to a wide spectrum of heart diseases in addition to problems not commonly seen in the US such as malaria, typhoid and rheumatic heart disease. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-850. Medical Care Delivery System. This course is designed as a year long longitudinal elective in which students can be enrolled in this elective and another at the same time. Course Credit: 2.5 credits; can be combined with a 2-week elective for a full month credit of 5 hours. 

MDCOR-851. WikiEd: Medical Writing. This course allows students to edit a medical article on Wikipedia. Through this activity, they will develop skills in identifying and evaluating  biomedical information as well as medical writing  and editing while also augmenting their personal  knowledge base. The course begins with classroom  orientation and instruction on Wikipedia article  selection and evaluation, identifying and  evaluating credible sources of biomedical  information, editing medical content in  Wikipedia, medical writing for public  consumption, and health literacy. For the remainder of the elective, students will work  independently under the supervision of an MD and  librarian to evaluate their sources and integrate  evidence-based biomedical information into their  article with a goal of improving the quality of  the information available to those accessing  Wikipedia. Weekly virtual progress meetings will  be conducted and student work will be reviewed  throughout and at the conclusion of the course.  The course is graded honors/pass/fail. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-852. Innovating SC Hlthcare Deliv. This 4th year elective, sponsored by Dean Ray  Dubois and directed by Dr. Donna Kern, will  engage MUSC students to deepen their knowledge  about health care delivery systems in general and  specifically in South Carolina. In addition,  students will work collaboratively to apply this  knowledge to develop a proposal for health care  delivery in South Carolina which will be  presented to Governor McMaster. To accomplish  this, students will participate in daily didactic  sessions, small group working sessions, and  independent study. In addition to a curated  reading list, didactic sessions will be led by  internal MUSC faculty as well as external  experts. By the end of the elective block,  students will produce a proposal for a South  Carolina Health Delivery System. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-860. Medical Errors Longitudinal. This course will consist of a series of 14 educational sessions of 1.5 hours each, offered in both fall and spring semester. Each session will be comprised of a short lecture followed by interactive small group discussions and will end with wrap-up comments by the course faculty. A printed syllabus will be provided for this course, with one or two interesting articles to be read by the student prior to each class. 2.5 s.h.

MDCOR-864. CCX2 & Board Review. Students must complete and pass CCX2 and take Step 1 of the NBME. 1 s.h.

MDCOR-865. Clinical Competency Exam 3. This is a required evaluation given early in the fourth year that each student must pass in order to graduate from MUSC.  It consists of 8-10 simulated patient interactions that require the student to gather information from the history and physical examination, decide what the problem is and either take action or document the findings, assessment and plan. 1 s.h.

MDCOR-871. MSTP Translational Sciences. The goal of this elective is for MSTP students to learn how to better integrate the basic sciences and their area of research interest with a meaningful clinical/translational experience. The students are expected to discuss the patient's problems from a literature/research perspective. They will work in a clinic, one-half day a week with an extramurally funded clinician-scientist who is chosen based on his/her demonstrated commitment to research. This is an elective clinic and is not required of MSTP students. The mentors for his elective could help the students with a potential clinical study that may evolve from their basic science project. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity.         2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MDCOR-970E. Medical Education Research. Individualized Research. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-971E. Basic Science Research. Individualized Research. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-972E. Public Health Research. Individualized research. 5 s.h.

MDCOR-980. Indep Board Review Step I. Independent study for Medical students taking board exams. 6 s.h.

MDCOR-985. Indep Board Review Step II. Independent study for Medical students taking board exams. 6 s.h.

MED-801. Internal Medicine Clerkship. On the Internal Medicine core clerkship, third-year medical students care for hospitalized adult patients with a variety of diagnoses and clinical problems. Through experiential learning by working with residents and attending physicians on the General Internal Medicine inpatient ward services at the Medical University Hospital (MUH), Ashley River Tower (ART) and the Veterans Hospital (VA), students will develop the knowledge and skills to actively care for hospitalized adult patients.  In addition, students will complete an ambulatory component during the Internal Medicine Clerkship to develop skills necessary to provide ambulatory primary care services. Students are expected to take responsibility for actively caring for patients, including interviewing, examining, and communicating with patients, as well as presenting and documenting patients' clinical courses. Performing, documenting and verbally presenting histories and physical examinations of patients in emphasized throughout the clerkship. In addition, students are expected to develop differential diagnoses, assessments and treatment plans that demonstrate understanding patients' illness and the impact of illness on the patient and family. Students' clinical experiences are supplemented by didactics, conferences, and small group interactive discussions. Prerequisite: successful completion of second year courses and a passing score on Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Exam. 10 s.h.

MED-811. Endocrinology. This course is designed to expose fourth-year medical students to see patients with endocrine disorders. Students will work with endocrinologist in the office and on rounds/consultations in hospital. 2.5 s.h.

MED-812. Pulmonary/Crit Care Med MC. This course is designed to expose fourth-year medical students to common pulmonary diseases that are seen in the in-patient setting as well as in the pulmonary office. Students will participate in the care of pulmonary patients in the office, on the hospital war and in the ICU. Students will learn to Interpret pulmonary function and be exposed to common pulmonary procedures such as thorocentesis and bronchoscopy and their indications. 5 s.h.

MED-813. Rheumatology. The fourth year medical student will rotate in a busy two physician rheumatology practice. The student will present patients in the office. It is expected that the student will gain knowledge/experience with common rheumatology disorders (crystalline arthropathies; inflammatory arthritis including spondyloarthropathies; rheumatoid arthritis; systemic lupus erythematosus; osteoporosis; fibromyalgia; and vasculitis). 2.5 s.h.

MED-820. Allergy & Immunology. Students will see both ADULT and PEDIATRIC patients 5 days a week in our outpatient offices. Students will learn about asthma, allergic skin diseases, food allergies, insect allergies, and immune deficiencies. They will also learn about the economics of an outpatient office. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-820J. Outpt Allergy, Asthma & Immuno. Students will see both ADULT and PEDIATRIC patients 5 days a week in outpatient offices. Students will learn about asthma, allergic skin diseases, food allergies, and immune deficiencies. They will also learn about the economics of an outpatient office. 2.5 s.h.

MED-824. Infectious Disease. This is an inpatient consultation service rotation designed to expose fourth-year medical students to the field of Infectious Disease. The student will see patients with infectious diseases under supervision by the attending physician and learn the diagnostic approach as well as medical management of these patients. 2.5 s.h.

MED-824J. General Internal Medicine. This selective introduces the student to the care of the hospitalized adult patient. By working alongside patient care teams on the General Internal Medicine inpatient ward services at the Medical University Hospital (MUH), Ashley River Tower (ART), and the Veterans Hospital, students will learn firsthand about caring for the hospitalized adult patient. Students will be expected to learn the role of the patients' primary hospitalist and should take an active role in the documentation of the patient's hospital stay. Emphasis is placed on performing, documenting, and presenting histories and physical examinations of patients; developing differential diagnoses, assessment, and treatment plans; actively participating in the care of patients, and understanding the impact of illness on the patient and family. 4 s.h.

MED-825. Gastroenterology. This rotation will be inpatient and outpatient to give the fourth-year medical student exposure to the field of gastroenterology. The student will be exposed to patients with digestive diseases and learn the diagnostic approach as well as the medical management of these patients. The student will also observe endoscopic procedures and understand their role in the care of these patients as well. 5 s.h.

MED-826. Electrocardiography. This two week elective will work with three internal medicine physicians to learn the intricacies of reading electrocardiograms. There is an on-line curriculum that must be completed during the two weeks. All ECGs done at the residency during the two weeks will be read by the senior medical student along with oversight by the two attending physicians. One-on-one sessions will be done with the attending physicians. Clinical time will be in the AnMed Health Family Medical Center. 2.5 s.h.

MED-827. Cardiology. This is an inpatient/outpatient rotation designed to expose 4th year medical students to the field of cardiology. The student will be exposed to patients with cardiac diseases, learn the diagnostic approach, as well as the medical management of these patients. The student will spend time in the cardiac cath labs, CDU, CCU and inpatient cardiology ward. There will be time spent in the ECG reading lab as well as in the private office of a cardiology group. 5 s.h.

MED-832. A Month in the Research Nexus. At the end of this course, the student will be able to:  Understand the principles and practice of clinical investigation, Write a clinical investigation protocol,  Understand some of the controversies in medicine. 5 s.h.

MED-833. Coronary Care Unit/Cardiology. This rotation provides an opportunity to enhance clinical and procedural skills in a cardiac intensive care environment. The student will illicit history and physical examinations, correlate findings with laboratory and diagnostic data, and assist the resident with daily care and management of critically ill patients. Daily notes and rounds with the attending, fellow, and resident physicians is expected. EKG interpretation will be mastered. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-835. Palliative Care. The Hospice and Palliative Medicine Elective is based on the Voluntary Program Standards for residency Education in Palliative Medicine 2005. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-836. Medical Intensive Care Unit. The course is an introduction to management of adult critically ill patients with a variety of complex diseases.  The student will participate in all aspects of care including diagnosis and management.  They will receive instruction in ventilator management (including bi-vent, oscillator, and non-invasive ventilation), pulmonary artery catheter use, and central line use.  They will receive instruction in pharmacotherapy of the critically ill, and will have the opportunity to learn a variety of procedures such as central line placement, arterial line placement, and the use of ultrasound in the ICU.  Students will participate in all of the academic activities of the Critical Care Team including the Division of Pulmonary Medicine in the Department of Medicine. They are expected to serve at the level of an intern this includes performing an admission history and physical, developing a differential diagnosis and treatment plan.  It is also expected that the student will review relevant information in the medical literature regarding their patients146 disease state.  Once a week call is strongly encouraged, but not required. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-842. Gastroenterology Hepatolog MC. This is an outpatient clinical (2 weeks) and inpatient consultation service (2 weeks) rotation designed to expose the 4th-year medical student to the field of Hepatology. The student will also observe endoscopic procedures and understand their role in the care of the patients. Students will rotate at the VA Clinic so current VA logins and codes are required. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity.              2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-843. Patient-Centered Medical Home. The Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) care delivery model has moved to the forefront of primary care re-design. The goals of a PCMH are to provide well-coordinated, high quality, accessible, comprehensive, and patient-focused primary care. This 4-week elective will teach students the key elements of PCMH by pairing an experiential rotation in an adult medicine PCMH with a structured small group curriculum highlighting key concepts. Students will spend 4.5 days per week in an NCQA-designated PCMH practice and 0.5 days per week in small group didactics. 5 s.h.

MED-846. Complex Wound Care. Students will work with the Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing Team on a daily basis. The rotation will function as a consult service, with the student seeing patients with the team. The student will assist in patient teaching and will also work with the primary team to optimize wound care recommendations. 2.5 s.h.

MED-848. VA ICU. Students will be assigned to the VA therefore students must be current with VA logins and codes before starting this rotation. This is an opportunity for 4th year students to experience a medical intensive care unit and the introduction of the management of critically ill patients with a variety of complex diseases. To understand the critically ill patients in the ICU, the students will also participate in the pulmonary consult service and inpatient and outpatient procedures. Students will learn how to interpret pulmonary function, and be exposed to common pulmonary and critical care procedures such as thorocentesis, bronchoscopy, ventilator and sepsis management, central line placement, and end of life discussions. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-849. Nephrology MC. Students on this rotation will be exposed to patients with acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, electrolyte abnormalities, and end stage renal disease. The student will work in an outpatient setting as well as in the hospital and dialysis center. 5 s.h.

MED-849J. Pulmonary Medicine VA. Students will be assigned to the VA therefore students must be current with VA logins and codes before starting this rotation. This is an opportunity for 3rd year students to experience the pulmonary consult service at the VA in addition to being introduced to the medical intensive care unit at the VA. The students will participate in the care of complex pulmonary patients on the pulmonary consult service, learn how to interpret pulmonary function, and will be exposed to common pulmonary procedures such as thorocentesis and bronchoscopy and their indications. 2.5 s.h.

MED-851. Nephrology MC. The student will participate directly in patient care topics in nephrology and hypertension in a supervised teaching environment of dedicated faculty, fellows and housestaff. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-855. Cardiology MC. This elective is designed to expose students to consultive adult cardiology both inpatient and outpatient. 5 s.h.

MED-858. Gastroenterology Luminal MC. This course in adult gastroenterology provides students with sufficient exposure and knowledge so that they may be better prepared to deal with patients suffering from disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, biliary tract, pancreas and liver. 5 s.h.

MED-859. Hematology/Oncology MC. This elective provides a broad and integrated exposure to the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and state-of-the-art management of patients with a variety of solid-organ tumors, hematologic malignancies, and other hematologic disorders including anemias and hereditary and acquired bleeding and clotting disorders. This is accomplished by assignment to the Consultation Service, participation in rounds on the inpatient Oncology-Hematology Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, attendance at the outpatient clinics, and formal training with the instructor in the interpretation of peripheral blood smears and bone marrow aspirates. 5 s.h.

MED-861. Infectious Diseases MC. This elective consists of consultation rounds with the infectious disease attending, fellow and medical resident at MUH providing extensive exposure to the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases precipitating hospital admission or occurring during hospitalization for non-infectious problems. The student will work up inpatients for presentation to the infectious diseases attending. The progress of inpatients will be monitored closely. Clinical experience is supplemented and extended by case conferences, Journal Club and a didactic lecture series. The didactic series is an 8 lecture series repeated each month by all faculty and fellows and provides an introduction to the practice of infectious diseases.  HIV infection is not a part of this course. Please discuss with course director for possible opportunities to be involved in HIV care. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-862. Endocrinology MC. This course provides student participation in the activities of the division: inpatient consultations, several outpatient clinics (Endocrinology, Diabetes Mellitus, Thyroid 150 private consultations), investigation of patients with endocrine/metabolic problems, weekly case conferences, noon house staff conferences, weekly conferences with the division (a topic oriented conference) and Journal Club. Direct contact with attendings is employed in all clinical settings. 5 s.h.

MED-864. Internal Medicine Externship. The student assumes the role of a PGY-l house officer. The student is expected to discharge the responsibilities appropriate for that position, including performance of the history and physical examination, providing clinical care and documentation of patients. The student works closely with a supervising medicine resident and attending physician. The student participates in the scheduled conferences offered by the Department of Medicine. 5 s.h.

MED-865. Pulmonary Medicine MC. This course allows students to review and apply principles of respiratory pathophysiology to disease states, introduces them to a variety of clinical forms of pulmonary disease and instructs them in the principles of respiratory care. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-868. Rheumatology & Immunology MC. This elective emphasizes the evaluation and management of outpatients with common musculoskeletal diseases.  The majority of the time is spent in private and public ambulatory clinics of the division.  Limited exposure to complicated inpatient consultations is available. Students will have intense one-on-one contact with faculty in the evaluation of ambulatory patients. Variable credit hours. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-871. Heart Failure / Transplant. Exposure to the full spectrum of diagnosis and treatment of congestive heart failure. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-891. Med Hospitalist Consults MC. The 4 week course is 2 weeks on the hospitalist consult service at MUSC and 2 weeks on the community hospitalist service at East Cooper Hospital in Mount Pleasant. The 2 week course is either.  At both sites, the student is expected to independently evaluate patients, follow them daily, and present findings/plan to the hospitalist attending. The consult team at MUSC consists of an attending hospitalist and a medical resident. At East Cooper, the student works solely with an attending hospitalist. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-891J. Hepatology. Demonstrate proficiency in assessing patients with liver disease and understanding the components of the history and physical exam that are essential for managing these patients. 2.5 s.h.

MED-892. Novel Approaches Primary Care. Students will rotate at the Harvest Free Medical Center, a faith-based facility in N. Charleston that delivers primary care to the indigent, and at Detyens Medical Center, a facility owned by Detyens Shipyards, Inc., that cares for its employees and their families at no cost to the employees. Time will be spent primarily in clinical duties in both sites (housed in the same building), but opportunities for clinical research are available. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-894J. Subspecialty Consults/Clinics. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Demonstrate proper techniques for interviewing a patient to obtain a medical history and performing a physical examination in the inpatient setting. 2. Demonstrate analysis, synthesis, and integration of pertinent patient data. 3. Formulate a comprehensive, ordered differential diagnosis. 4. Present patient data gathered from patient interviews, physical examinations, and laboratory sources, including progress notes on patients, in standardized format. 5. Document patient data gathered from patient interviews, physical examinations, and laboratory sources, including progress notes on patients, in standardized format. 6. Apply knowledge of the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and natural history of diseases to the diagnosis and management of common patient conditions in Internal Medicine. 7. Perform diagnostic and lab test interpretation skills commonly used in Internal Medicine. 8. Demonstrate effective and professional interpersonal and communication skills in interactions with patients, including an awareness of psychosocial factors related to patients' problems. 9. Demonstrate professional demeanor and ethical behavior. 2.5 s.h.

MED-896J. Cardiology Outpatient Clinic. This selective gives students the opportunity to learn about Cardiology in a clinical setting. 2.5 s.h.

MED-897J. VA Cardiology & EKG. This selective offers students the opportunity to lead, assist, and appreciate EKGS. 2.5 s.h.

MED-898J. Caring for Diabetic Patient. To understand basic classification of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, Latent autoimmune adult onset, gestational, etc. 2.5 s.h.

MED-899J. Endocrinology Neoplasia. Know and understand pathophysiology of common neoplastic disorders of the endocrine system (i.e. thyroid cancer, including post-surgical hypothyrodism and hypoparathyroidism and benign thyroid nodules; pituitary tumors and pituitary hypersecretory and deficiency syndromes; hyperparathyrodiam; MEN syndromes). 2.5 s.h.

MED-900A. Medicine Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-900E. Medicine Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-900J. Inpatient Cardiology. This is a junior selective in Cardiology. 2.5 s.h.

MED-901J. Inpatient Hematology. This is a junior selective in hematology. 2.5 s.h.

MED-970E. Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

MED-995J. Nephrology Consultation. This is a junior selective in Nephrology. 2.5 s.h.

NEURO-801. Neuro & Rehab Med Clerkship. At the conclusion of this rotation students should be able to obtain a neurological history, competently perform the neurological examination, and formulate the diagnostic and treatment plan for neurological disorders.  Students are assigned to two clinical sites where they participate actively in daily patient care. (Inpatient and Outpatient) Students will present cases seen to the attending physician and will work closely with neurology house staff in patient care matters. Students may express a preference for assignment to do an adult or pediatric rotation, but actual assignment will be based on a balanced allocation of students to the various sites. In addition, they will be assigned to two rehabilitation experiences.  Each student must take one night of overnight call on the neurology clerkship.  The medical students also participate in three weekly lectures and participate in the simulation lab.  During the course, they will also be responsible for completely specific materials in the Moodle Classroom.  On the last day of the rotation, students will take the NBME Shelf Exam to assess their knowledge of neurologic disease. Students must pass the Shelf Exam to successfully complete the rotation.  Grading will be based on the clinical performance evaluation (CPE), the shelf exam, SIM lab attendance, and completion of Moodle Quizzes. 8 s.h.

NEURO-841. Neurovascular Outpatient. The outpatient clinical stroke rotation is designed to give fourth year medical students an opportunity to interact with the Department of Neurology stroke faculty in a clinical setting. They will have the opportunity to learn stroke etiologies, diagnosis, treatment and management, secondary stroke prevention and stroke recovery, and management of post-stroke complications. In addition, students will have the chance to learn about the MUSC REACH tele-stroke network. Students who are taking a neurology course for the first time will be required to take the NBME Neurology Shelf Exam. 5 s.h.

NEURO-845. Neuro-Ophthalmology. The goals of the course are for the student to learn and apply neurology to the ophthalmologic system.  The student will be able to identify, and reasonably recognize and determine objective indications for visual concerns in patients. The student will learn to use common ophthalmologic tools. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

NEURO-851. Pediatric Neurology. This elective focuses on commonly seen pediatric neurology problems seen in an outpatient setting. Students are first to evaluate the patient and their families as they work in a daily partnership with one of more pediatric neurology faculty attendings. Emphasis is on mastering the fundamentals of history-taking and patient assessment and on learning patient care approaches for common neuro-developmental disorders. Examples include seizures, migraine, motor or language delay, cerebral palsy, head injuries, tic disorders and sleep disorders. Hours are approximately 8:00 AM to 5:30 PM. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

NEURO-854. Vascular Neurology (stroke). Students will be exposed to clinical neurovascular (stroke) patients to acquire a basic knowledge of the clinical examination and patient interviewing, vascular risk factors for stroke and neuro-imaging (CT, MRI, TCD, etc.). Academic opportunities will be presented from shadowing the attending on wards, stroke clinic, research meetings/conferences, as well as at least two (but more if possible) open or endovascular surgical procedures arranged by the course director. Student will learn about evidence-based clinical study design and journal article review. Student will be introduced to the REACH-MUSC telemedicine program. 5 s.h.

NEURO-859. General Adult Neuro Externship. Exposes the student to intern level responsibilities for patient care. Allows the student to perform clinically while under close supervision. Experience occurs on a hospital inpatient service. Students will be expected to work-up and evaluate patients, present cases to an attending physician, and participate fully in all aspects of patient care. Teaching will emphasize clinical/anatomical correlations as well as other aspects of professionalism in patient care. The Clinical Core Neurology Shelf exam will be offered to those who have not previously taken it. 5 s.h.

NEURO-900A. Neurology Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

NEURO-970E. Neurology Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 5 s.h.

NSGY-802J. General Neurosurgery. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Recognize clinical neurosurgical diagnoses and discuss their management issues in some of the most common neurosurgical disorders (subdural and epidural hematomas, head/spine trauma, hydrocephalus, AVM, etc.). 2. Perform a focused history and neurological exam for neurosurgical disorders. 3. Discuss basic neurosurgical approaches to common neurosurgical disorders, as well as the post-operative care and long-term management issues. 4. Understand the contributions and limitations of diagnostic imaging (CT, MRI) and neurophysiological testing (EEG, EMG/NCV) in patient assessments. 5. Discuss the non-surgical treatment of neurosurgical diagnoses and the common complications which might occur with/or without neurosurgical intervention. 2.5 s.h.

NSGY-852. Gen Neurosurg Externship ASE. This neurosurgery externship will provide exposure to all facets of neurosurgery, both pediatric and adult. Students will have the opportunity to provide outpatient and inpatient pre-operative and post-operative care in the clinic and hospital setting. Through didactic teaching, care of patients in the clinic and hospital, and direct observation of neurosurgical procedures, students will become familiar with common neurosurgical disorders and methods of treatment at all ages. Students will be expected to have an on-call schedule similar to a PGY-II neurosurgical resident. 5 s.h.

NSGY-860. Neuroscience ICU Externship. This Neurosciences ICU externship will provide students with a thorough understanding of basic general critical care and neuro-critical care concepts. The students are expected to read the syllabus that is provided to them. Students are expected to learn the fundamentals of resuscitating patients with severe acute neurologic injuries. Students will become familiar with airway management issues, respiratory management, circulatory support, management of increased intracranial pressure, and management of comorbid conditions seen in patients with acute neurologic injury. Students will be expected to become familiar with all critical care issues and instructed on imaging interpretation as it pertains to ICU patients. Students will participate in hands-on procedures under close supervision and will be expected to have an on-call schedule similar to a PGY-II neurology resident. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

NSGY-901A. Neurosurgery Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 5 s.h.

NSGY-901E. Neurosurgery Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 5 s.h.

NSGY-971E. Neurosurgery Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 5 s.h.

OBGYN-801. OB/GYN Clerkship. This clerkship teaches students about all elements of women's health care including pregnancy care, preventive care, management of gynecologic complaints,  perioperative care, and gynecologic cancers. They participate in inpatient and outpatient care of women and encounter a variety of surgical experiences under supervision of residents and faculty. In addition to direct patient care, students participate in Student Learning Teams, a longitudinal small group experience designed to teach high yield topics in the field of obstetrics and gynecology while integrating basic science concepts, clinical reasoning, and clinical skills such as note writing, counseling, and use of national guidelines to guide care. Students also participate in a variety of additional learning activities such as Grand Rounds, suture lab, and an Unstable Patient Simulation. Prerequisite: successful completion of second year courses and a passing score on Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Exam. 8 s.h.

OBGYN-840. Centering Pregnancy. This is a longitudinal outpatient clinical rotation during which students will participate in the delivery of care to a group of pregnant women from the 2nd trimester until delivery. Students will be assigned to a group of women participating in Centering Pregnancy, a contemporary model of prenatal care that encourages self-assessment, education, and emotional support during pregnancy. The benefits of this model of prenatal care include higher patient satisfaction, a reduction in preterm birth, low birth weight, and increase in breastfeeding postpartum. Beginning after 14-16 weeks gestation, groups meet monthly for 4 visits and then every 2 weeks for 6 visits. Students will be expected to participate in at least 7 group sessions that last 2 hours and occur at the same time and day of the week. Students will be expected to participate in physical assessments of gravid women and assist with group facilitation. 1 s.h.

OBGYN-853. GYN Oncology Externship ASE. Student will function as a sub intern on the gynecologic oncology service in the setting of the inpatient service, outpatient clinic and operating room.  Formal didactic teaching and a weekly tumor board are included. 5 s.h.

OBGYN-861. Maternal Fetal Med Externship. This elective rotation is designed to offer the student an opportunity for enhanced experience in the management of high-risk obstetrical patients. The student will have a tutorial relationship with the faculty and fellows from the Section of Maternal-Fetal medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Clinically, the student will have an experience in ultrasonography, genetic counseling, prenatal diagnostic testing, and high-risk antepartum care. The student will also participate in the intrapartum care of private high risk obstetrical patients and have the opportunity to participate in operative obstetrics. The student will also participate in weekly didactic teaching conferences sponsored by the section of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OBGYN-872. Reproductive Infectious Diseas. The rotation will introduce students to the discipline of Reproductive Infectious Diseases (RID). The student will work with the RID fellows and faculty in both outpatient and inpatient settings. This will include attending specialty clinics at MUSC Women's Health for sexually transmitted infections, perinatal HIV, and women with vulvar disease and recurrent vaginitis. Under the guidance of the RID attendings and fellows, RID elective students will see women with postpartum and postoperative infections, inpatient RID consultations, and patients admitted with reproductive infections, e.g. PID, complications of HIV in pregnancy. Students must receive approval from the OBGYN Medical Student Education Director to schedule Blocks 1-6. 5 s.h.

OBGYN-873. Labor/Delivery Night Float Ext. This externship will expose students to all aspects of inpatient services of Labor & Delivery. Students will work closely with the ObGyn Specialists & Maternal Fetal Medicine faculty and residents in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. This student will have the opportunity to observe and participate in the inpatient labor & delivery unit, assist with operating room cases, and triage patients. Students will also develop skills in the interpretation of NSTs and will perform basic ultrasounds. They will be involved in vaginal and cesarean deliveries. Students must receive approval from the OBGYN Medical Student Education Director to schedule Blocks 1-6. 5 s.h.

OBGYN-876J. MFM Ultrasound. This selective will expose the participating student to all aspects of obstetric ultrasound. The student will work with the Maternal Fetal Medicine Faculty in the outpatient setting. The student will review ultrasounds, accompany the faculty when patients are counseled regarding their ultrasound findings, and observe ultrasound-guided procedures. The student will also have the opportunity to work with the Genetics Counselors while on the rotation. 2.5 s.h.

OBGYN-878. Family Planning. This elective will provide students an opportunity to explore the subspecialty of family planning including contraception, pregnancy options counseling, pregnancy termination, and management of miscarriage. Students will have the opportunity to observe patient care at an abortion clinic in Charleston, participate in patient care in our Early Pregnancy Failure and Contraception Clinics, and assist with gynecologic procedures in the operating room. Students will also have structured didactics and will complete an evidence-based medicine assignment and a narrative medicine assignment. The elective includes protected time for completion of readings and projects. 2.5 s.h.

OBGYN-879. Benign Gynecology ASE. This elective offers students an opportunity to  enhance their experience in the management of  gynecological patients. This student will be  responsible for rounding on the inpatient benign  gynecology service, attending operating room  cases, and participating in select subspeciality  outpatient experiences (ex: urogynecology).  Students must receive approval from the OBGYN  Medical Student Education Director to schedule  Blocks 1-6. 5 s.h.

OBGYN-885J. General Obstetrics/Gynecology. This selective introduces students to the basic knowledge and clinical problems encountered in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. Students are taught to acquire and develop their clinical skills in the care of patients. Emphasis is placed on obtaining experiences in routine obstetrics delivery, outpatient gynecologic management, and common gynecologic surgery. Under supervision, students take histories and perform physical examinations. 2.5 s.h.

OBGYN-900A. OB/GYN Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OBGYN-900E. OB/GYN Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OBGYN-970E. OB/GYN Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OPHTH-854. General Ophthalmology. This elective is designed to introduce the student to clinical ophthalmology.  The student will participate in didactic sessions including Grand Rounds, Journal Clubs and Friday afternoon lectures.  Students will work one-on-one with ophthalmology residents and attending examining patients and observing surgery.  A text will be provided as a checklist of practical goals which should be achieved over the course of the rotation. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OPHTH-856. Ophthalmology. This two-week elective will introduce medical students to clinical ophthalmology. Students will work with attending physician in outpatient ophthalmology office and observe surgery in office and hospital. 2.5 s.h.

OPHTH-880J. Ophthalmology. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Understand the role and scope of ophthalmology within medicine. 2. Initiate an ophthalmology exam with a standard screening protocol. 3. Identify the presentation of acute and common ophthalmology complaints. 4. Triage acute and common ophthalmology complaints and understand when to consult the ophthalmology service. 5. Identify common ophthalmology surgeries. For example:      - Cataract surgery (Phacoemulsification/Intraocular lens placement)      - Strabismus surgery      - Corneal transplant surgery      - Pars Plana Vitrectomy      - Retinal Detachment Surgery      - Glaucoma filtering or tube/shunt surgery      - Oculoplastic surgery 2.5 s.h.

OPHTH-900A. Ophthalmology Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OPHTH-900E. Ophthalmology Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OPHTH-970E. Ophthalmology Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OSURG-848J. Orthopedics. This selective offers the third year medical student who may be interested in a surgical career the opportunity to observe orthopedic surgeons in their office, on the wards and in the operating rooms of the hospital. 2.5 s.h.

OSURG-850. Ortho Surgery Externship ASE. Daily involvement with outpatient office practice, both outpatient and inpatient surgery including follow up.  Student will function as a sub-intern while on this rotation. 5 s.h.

OSURG-864. Office Based Orthopaedics. This course offers students the opportunity to develop their evaluation and management of disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Students spend four weeks rotating through the orthopaedic subspecialty services. These services may include sports medicine, pediatric orthopaedics, adult reconstruction, hand, oncology foot and ankle, and spine. This rotation is for students interested in the care of the musculoskeletal system but not interested in a career in orthopaedic surgery. The students will also rotate at the South Carolina Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center. 5 s.h.

OSURG-866. Orthopaedics ASE. This course offers the fourth-year medical student the opportunity to develop their evaluation and management of disorders of musculoskeletal system. There will be experiences in the clinic, the hospital and the operating room. 5 s.h.

OSURG-880J. Orthopedic Surgery. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Demonstrate an orthopaedic physical exam of the upper and lower extremities to spine. 2. Demonstrate the radiographic features of osteoarthritis. 3. Know the signs and symptoms of compartment syndrome. 4. Apply a plaster splint to the upper and lower extremities. 2.5 s.h.

OSURG-900A. Orthopedic Surgery Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OSURG-900E. Orthopedic Surgery Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OSURG-970E. OSURG Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OTOL-850. Otolaryngology Primary Ca ASE. This course is an introduction to the evaluation and management of diseases of the head and neck. Students attend a clinically oriented lecture series, participate in the outpatient clinics and have closely supervised inpatient responsibility. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OTOL-851. Otolaryngology Externship ASE. Intensive clinical experience in otolaryngology head and neck surgery. The student is given direct responsibility for inpatient care and is expected to participate in the operating room (under the personalized instruction of the attending staff). 5 s.h.

OTOL-853. Community Otolaryngology ASE. Introductory course of general (adult and pediatric) otolaryngology for students interested in pursuing careers in primary care medicine. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OTOL-854. Otorhinolaryngology ASE. This course is an introduction to the evaluation and management of diseases of the head and neck. Students attend a clinically-oriented lecture series, participate in the outpatient clinics and have closely supervised inpatient responsibility. 5 s.h.

OTOL-855. Otolaryngology ASE. This two week rotation is an introduction to the evaluation and management of diseases of the ear, nose, throat, and head and neck. Student will work with attending physician in the office and surgery suite. Emphasis upon the diagnosis and management of otitis media, chronic sinusitis, adenotonsillar hyperthrophy, hearing loss, and common neck masses in adults and children. 2.5 s.h.

OTOL-860. Head & Neck Surg Onc Ext ASE. This course is an introduction to the evaluation and management of tumors of the head and neck. Students will function as an acting extern and will be responsible for learning the outpatient and inpatient care of patients with tumors of the head and neck. The student will be comfortable with the full head and neck exam, diagnostic evaluation, and perioperative management of head and neck tumor patients. 5 s.h.

OTOL-880J. Otolaryngology Overview. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Know / demonstrate the essential components of a thorough head and neck history- taking and physical examination 2. Understand and discuss the applied anatomy of the face, ear, nose/sinuses, mouth, pharynx, larynx and neck 3. Gain exposure to patients with various common head and neck pathologies including otitis media, vertigo, rhinitis, epistaxis, sinusitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, stridor, dysphagia, dysphonia, facial trauma, and head & neck tumors/defects. 4. Recognize and describe symptoms suggestive of head and neck malignancies; and recognize abnormal exam findings of the oral cavity and pharynx, including malignant lesions and lesions suspicious for malignancy. 5. Provide a differential diagnosis of a patient with a neck mass. 6. Describe the diagnostic workup of a patient with head and neck cancer. 7. Describe some options for reconstructing a variety of head and neck defects resulting from trauma, congenital anomalies or cancer resections. 8. Describe the clinical aspects and develop differential diagnoses for hearing loss & vertigo; understand basic audiologic tests. 9. Describe common causes of hoarseness in adults and in children 10. List the differential diagnosis for stridor and be familiar with emergent and long-term airway management techniques. 11. Understand basic speech and swallowing principles and evaluations. 12. Describe the work-up and treatments of common childhood ear, nose, and throat diseases 13. Describe some basic aesthetic principles of facial plastic & reconstructive surgery 14. List the common causes of rhinorrhea and nasal obstruction 15. Define acute and chronic rhinosinusitis, and describe the work-up and treatment options. 16. Understand indications for Otolaryngologic consultation 17. Observe various Oto-HNS surgical procedures, including endoscopic sinus surgery, tonsillectomy, pressure equalization tube insertions, laryngoscopy and cancer resections and reconstructive surgeries. 2.5 s.h.

OTOL-881J. Head & Neck Surg Onc. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Demonstrate the essential components of a thorough head and neck history-taking and physical examination. 2. Discuss the applied anatomy of the face, ear, nose/sinuses, mouth, pharynx, larynx and neck 3. Describe patients with various head and neck pathologies including head and neck cancers/tumors, stridor, dysphagia, dysphonia and head & neck defects. 4. Understand the risk factors for head and neck cancer 5. Recognize and describe symptoms suggestive of head and neck malignancies; and recognize abnormal exam findings of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx, including malignant lesions and lesions suspicious for malignancy. 6. Provide a differential diagnosis of a patient with a neck mass. 7. Describe the diagnostic workup of a patient with head and neck cancer. 8. Describe some options for reconstructing a variety of head and neck defects resulting from trauma, congenital anomalies or cancer resections. 9. Describe the workup for a thyroid mass or 147goiter148, and understand the indications for surgical intervention. 10. List the differential diagnosis and workup for parotid or submandibular swelling. 11. Discuss the fundamental of emergent and long-term airway management techniques. 12. Understand basic speech and swallowing principles and evaluations. 13. Interpret basic head and neck imaging studies 14. Describe some basic aesthetic principles of facial plastic & reconstructive surgery 15. Understand and describe head and neck cancer staging for specific sites 16. Understand and describe various treatment options for head and neck cancers depending on type, site, stage. 17. Understand indications for OtoHNS consultation 18. Describe various Oto-HNS surgical procedures, including tracheostomy, neck dissections, various head & neck cancer resections and reconstructive surgeries including but not limited to skin grafts, local flaps, pedicled flaps and microvascular free flaps. 4 s.h.

OTOL-883J. Pediatric Otolaryngology. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Know / demonstrate the essential components of a thorough head and neck history- taking and physical examination 2. Understand and discuss the applied anatomy of the face, ear, nose/sinuses, mouth, pharynx, larynx and neck and the unique qualities of the pediatric patient 3. Understand the embryologic considerations in Pediatric OtoHNS 3. Recognize pediatric patients with various common head and neck pathologies including otitis media, vertigo, rhinitis, epistaxis, sinusitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, stridor, dysphonia, trauma, and head & neck tumors. 4. Recognize and describe symptoms suggestive of pediatric head and neck malignancies; and recognize abnormal exam findings of the oral cavity and pharynx, including malignant lesions and lesions suspicious for malignancy. 5. Provide a differential diagnosis of a pediatric patient with a neck mass. 6. Describe the diagnostic workup of a pediatric patient with hearing loss. 7. Describe some options for reconstructing a variety of head and neck defects resulting from trauma, congenital anomalies or tumor resections. 8. Describe the clinical aspects and develop differential diagnoses for congenital hearing loss; understand basic audiologic testing methods in the peds patient. 9. Describe common causes of hoarseness in children 10. List the differential diagnosis for stridor and be familiar with emergent and long-term airway management techniques. 11. Understand basic speech and swallowing principles and evaluations. 12. Describe the work-up and treatments of common childhood ear, nose, and throat diseases 13. Describe some basic aesthetic principles of facial plastic & reconstructive surgery 14. List the common causes of unilateral rhinorrhea and nasal obstruction 15. Define acute and chronic rhinosinusitis, and describe the work-up and treatment options in the pediatric patient. 16. Understand indications for Peds-Otolaryngologic consultation 17. Recognize various Oto-HNS surgical procedures, including tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, pressure equalization tube insertions, laryngoscopy/bronchoscopy, tracheostomy, airway management, and tumor/cyst excisions and reconstructive surgeries. 4 s.h.

OTOL-900A. Otolaryngology Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OTOL-900E. Otolaryngology Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

OTOL-970E. Otolaryngology Research. This course is an introduction to head and neck oncology research. Projects include basic science bench research, translational research, and clinical research. Ongoing research in the head and neck tumor program includes immunotherapy, molecular diagnostics, gene therapy, cancer prevention and control, and speech/swallowing or dental/masticatory outcomes. The student will choose one project to pursue and will develop research methods, analyze results, and present following completion of the rotation. The student will be mentored by a clinician and basic scientist throughout the month. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PEDS-801. Pediatric Clerkship. Introduces pediatric pathologic processes and further develops clinical skills and experience in handling and managing both healthy and ill infants, children and adolescents, and their families, and encouraging application of basic science knowledge to patient care. Approximately one-third of the rotation is devoted to inpatient care with experiences both in acute/undiagnosed illnesses and chronic illnesses. Student will have rotations on the general pediatric wards and in the intensive care units.  A portion is devoted to the newborn nursery and the remainder to ambulatory/outpatient care (pediatric emergency department and general pediatric medical homes). Students engage in direct patient/parent contact with house staff and faculty supervision. Patient care experiences are supplemented with conferences, small group activities, and lectures. Prerequisite: successful completion of second year courses and a passing score on Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Exam. 8 s.h.

PEDS-810J. Intro to Devel-Behavioral Peds. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Identify developmental, behavioral and psychosocial problems using the medical history and exam of the school age child. 2. Describe the typical presentation of common developmental and behavioral problems in the school age child such as Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), sleep problems, enuresis and encoporesis. 3. Recognize academic underachievement and conditions that may be responsible such as learning disorders, ADHD and anxiety. 4. Understand the impact of biological, social and psychological aspects of the family that may lead to behavior problems (i.e., family history of mental illness, alcoholism, poverty, domestic violence). 5. Distinguish between age-appropriate behavior and abnormal behaviors that may suggest a neurodevelopmental/behavioral disorder. 6. Describe the interventions and community services available to children with behavioral problems. 2.5 s.h.

PEDS-812J. Pediatric Cardiology. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Discuss normal and complex cardiac anatomy and physiology in pediatric patients, the transitioning physiology of the neonate, and the complex cardiac physiology of congenital cardiac disease states. 2. Perform a basic pediatric cardiac examination and correlate cardiac exam findings to the cardiac physiology in the neonate and child. 3. Identify basic and complex congenital cardiac defects. 4. Perform basic electrocardiogram reading for pediatric patients. 5. Describe the management and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in pediatric patients. 6. Describe the surgical treatment of congenital heart disease, and the management of congenital and acquired cardiac disease. 2.5 s.h.

PEDS-813J. Pediatric Subspecialties. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Describe the importance of chronic diseases in Pediatrics, including their occurrence, care, outcome, and impact on the child and family. 2. Demonstrate approaches to maximize patient and family functioning. 3. Recognize the necessity of multi-disciplinary teams to optimize care and family support for children with chronic diseases. 4. Describe the challenges chronically-ill children face in school and the resources schools have to assess and help care for such children. 5. Recognize and appreciate variations in care style among various caregiver teams and disciplines. 6. Describe approaches to maximize compliance with care (getting the family to buy into daily care for their child. 2.5 s.h.

PEDS-817J. Pediatrics. This rotation will consist of 1 week of extended exposure to ambulatory pediatrics in a community pediatric center caring for a primarily underserved population as well as 2 weeks of extended exposure to inpatient pediatrics within a pediatric ward, Level I and Level II nurseries to enhance knowledge of both chronic and acute diseases. The student will have opportunities to participate in all aspects of patient care. Emphasis will include refining history-taking and physical exam skills as well as deeper development of differential diagnosis and treatment plans in preparation for the MS4 year. 2.5 s.h.

PEDS-818J. General Pediatrics. This selective introduces students to both common and unique pediatric pathologic processes; further develops their clinical skills and experience in handling and managing both healthy and ill infants, children, adolescents, and their families; and encourages the application of basic science knowledge to patient care. Rotation activities provide students with exposure to a variety of clinical settings, including inpatient wards, newborn nursery, ambulatory clinics, and critical care units. Students will gain experience in managing acute, undiagnosed illnesses and chronic illnesses (subspecialty care). 2.5 s.h.

PEDS-821. Pediatric Emergency Medicine. Student will function in role of intern, taking history and performing physicals on patients and performing minor procedures. Students will develop assessments and will learn to manage acute pediatric problems.  Recognize a sick child and initiate diagnostics and therapy.  Manage minor trauma and have an understanding of major trauma in the pediatric patient. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PEDS-822. Pediatric Allergy. The fourth year student will spend two weeks with our pediatric allergist in an outpatient setting. Student will learn about common pediatric allergies; evaluation tools (allergy testing); and treatment options for these conditions. 2.5 s.h.

PEDS-823. Pediatric Cardiology. During this elective, students will work directly with specialists in pediatric cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery and rotate through all areas of pediatric cardiology including:  one week in the cardiology clinic for outpatient pediatric cardiac consultations for new patients and the outpatient established patient evaluation,  one week in the inpatient ICU,  one week in the step-down floor for evaluation of the pre-operative and post-operative inpatient, and  one week in observation of trans-catheter corrective procedures OR a one week rotation as a member of the pediatric cardio-thoracic surgical team, dependent on student preference.  5 s.h.

PEDS-824. Pediatric Gastroenterology. 2.5 s.h.

PEDS-840. Developmental Pediatrics. The student will attend outpatient developmental clinics and perform supervised developmental assessments/evaluations for the spectrum of developmental and behavioral problems (ADHD, learning disabilities, autism, developmental delay, spina bifida, and neonatal high risk infant follow-up). 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PEDS-841. Human Milk and Lactation. Physiology of lactation will be discussed in the context of mother/infant dyad, maternal and infant health condition. The mechanics of breastfeeding will be understood through didactic and bedside teaching and interaction with Dr. Wagner during rounds and with MUSC's lactation consultants. The structure and bioactive/protective effect of human milk will be discussed in terms of epidemiological studies. Lastly, the students will spend one afternoon in the lab processing a milk sample, staining the cells and looking at the human milk under the microscope. 2.5 s.h.

PEDS-852. Pediatric Nephrology. Pediatric nephrology outpatient clinic and inpatient consultations. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PEDS-855. Genomics in Med Practice. Students will learn the impact of genomics in medical practice now and in the future. 2.5 s.h.

PEDS-857. Pediatric Urgent Care. The student will work with a group of pediatric urgent care specialists in Kids' Care. This is a busy seven day a week urgent care clinic for children. There will be hands on experience diagnosing common pediatric urgent care conditions as well as performing common urgent care procedures under direct supervision of an attending physician. 5 s.h.

PEDS-858. Pediatric Inpt Externship. The student will be exposed to pediatric inpatients and newborns with acute and chronic diseases and will participate in the complete care of the patient as part of the pediatric hospitalist team. Clinical emphasis will include interviewing and physical examination skills, discussions of pathophysiology, and formulation of diagnostic and treatment plans. 5 s.h.

PEDS-863. Pediatric Ward Externship. The extern will be  exposed to pediatric patients with acute and chronic diseases and  will participate in the complete care of the patient as part of the general pediatric team where they will learn to communicate with patients, families, staff and referring physicians. Clinical emphasis will include enhancement of interviewing and physical examination skills, discussions of pathophysiology, formulation of diagnostic and treatment plans and performance of commonly used procedures under the supervision of senior residents and attendings. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PEDS-864. Pediatric Cards Externship. Inpatient care of cardiology patients. 5 s.h.

PEDS-868. Primary Care Pediatrics. This rotation is in an ambulatory pediatric center that will allow the student to provide acute care and preventative health screenings to children ages 0 - 18 years of age. 5 s.h.

PEDS-870. Pediatric Hem/Onc Externship. A hands-on rotation on the clinical hematology/oncology services.  The student will participate in rounds, tumor board, consults and teaching sessions. 5 s.h.

PEDS-871. Clinical Genetics /Counseling. This course allows the student to gain additional fundamental knowledge of common genetic disorders encountered in day-to-day practice and to gain experience in analyzing the complex psychosocial and emotional aspects of genetic disorders and counseling.  Students will attend clinics at the Children's Hospital and outreach sites (Florence, Beaufort and Georgetown), perform supervised patient assessments, prepare case summaries and literature search assignments. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PEDS-876. Pediatric Critical Care Extern. A rotation in pediatric critical care encompasses the multiple facets applying intensive care techniques to pediatric patients with life-threatening problems. Pathophysiology and advanced diagnostic and therapeutic modalities will be stressed. 5 s.h.

PEDS-877. Neonatal Intensive Care Extern. The NICU (Newborn Intensive Care Unit) externship provides the extern, wanting to go into pediatrics or obstetrics, intensive exposure to pathophysiology of newborn disease. 5 s.h.

PEDS-879. Pediatric Infectious Diseases. This elective is designed to provide an in-depth and intensive exposure to both common and unusual infectious diseases of children. Variable credit hours. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PEDS-886J. Renal Disease in Peds. This is a junior selective in Pediatrics concerning renal diseases, their occurrence, care, outcome, and impact on the patient and family. 2.5 s.h.

PEDS-890. Child Abuse & Neglect. This elective is designed to allow the student to further their knowledge base in the area of child abuse/neglect (CAN).  The student will read and review laws relevant to CAN and develop an understanding of the Department of Social Services (DSS) as well as explore community resources and observe function of multidisciplinary review panel. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PEDS-900A. Pediatrics Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PEDS-900E. Pediatrics Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PEDS-970E. Pediatrics Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PHGEN-706. Intro to Public Health. The overall purpose of this elective course is to introduce students to the principles and core functions of public health in keeping with the 2002 recommendation of the Institute of Medicine. Materials presented in the course will enable students to understand the role of public health and its core functions to better understand patterns of diseases, global threats to health, and factors contributing to disparate health outcomes in population groups. 2 s.h. (MPH or PhD), 3 s.h. (MS or PhD)

PHGEN-708. Prin Environmental Health Sci. This course is designed for public health students interested in studying the relationships between people and their environment, and how it affects their well being. The course addresses fundamental topics and current debates in environmental health. 3 s.h.

PHGEN-710. Intro to U.S. Health Policy. This course aims to identify the main components and issues of the organization, financing, and delivery of health services within the various domains of public health in the U.S. It includes evaluation of several case studies of PH policy decisions and their implications. This course is required for all Master of Public Health students at MUSC. 3 s.h.

PHGEN-750. MPH Seminar. MPH Seminar is a 1 credit hour course for Master of Public Health students in the Department of Public Health Sciences (DPHS) offered in the fall and spring semesters.  Students are required to complete both the fall and spring semesters of the course (total of 2 credit hours).  Students attend DPHS-sponsored seminars every other Monday throughout the semester to gain exposure to contemporary topics in public health research.  Seminar speakers are invited guests to the department and represent a diversity of research topics that are complementary to the research interests of DPHS faculty.  On alternating Mondays, the department sponsors a professional Public Health seminar series featuring guest speakers from local public health agencies, MUSC departments, and local non-profits.  This valuable exposure helps first -year students identify potential mentors and projects for internship and volunteer hours, provides an overview of potential career paths for graduates, and introduces the pressing public health concerns that impact our region, nation and global communities. 1 s.h.

PHGEN-770. ILE Planning. This course is designed to help students and faculty jointly prepare for the Integrative Learning Experience in their final semester of their MPH Program.  The ILE or Capstone, as the culminating experience of the MPH program, requires students to synthesize and integrate knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences and apply it to analyzing and addressing a public health practice and/or research challenge.  This is a required 1-hour course available to all MPH students. It is designed to help students understand ILE requirements, gain skills necessary for successful completion of the ILE, and develop a proposal for their ILE experience with faculty and other mentors. At the end of the course, students will have developed a finalized ILE plan and gained skills to assure its completion.  The Applied Practice Experience or Internship course is a 180 hour practicum which requires students to gain professional work experience in the public health workforce.  This course will allow students to garner professional skills prior to starting their internship including resume building, interviewing tips, and workforce performance standards, along with internship and career exploration. 1 s.h.

PHGEN-780. App Practice Experience-Intern. Students enrolled in the MPH program are required to complete a field placement in an appropriate public health setting as part of the degree requirements. Sites include hospitals, not for profit organizations, government agencies, and worksite/for profit companies. A minimum of 180 contact hours will be required for the field placement. 6 s.h.

PHGEN-970. MPH Capstone. All MPH students will participate in a culminating experience which is required for graduation from the program. It is completed in the final semester in the MPH program and is graded P/F.  The capstone project will reflect the student's assimilation of theories and skills from didactic and experiential learning courses. Under the supervision of a faculty Capstone Advisor, the student executes a research plan and produces a final document for the capstone project, and also participates in the MPH Capstone Symposium- presenting their capstone project research in a public poster session. 3 s.h.

PHHBP-700. Social and Behavioral Sciences. The course introduces MPH students to the principles and practices of the social and behavioral science principles that can be used to guide the process of identifying, characterizing, and resolving public health problems to improve the health of individuals and populations. 3 s.h.

PHHBP-704. Appl Health Behavior Theory. Successful completion of this course will enable the student to describe the role of social and community factors in both the onset and solution of public health problems; identify the causes of social and behavioral factors that affect health of individuals and populations; identify basic theories, concepts and models; apply ethical principles to public health program planning, implementation and evaluation; specify multiple targets and levels of intervention; identify individual, organizational and community concerns, assets, resources and deficits; apply evidence-based approaches in the development and evaluation of interventions; describe the merits of social and behavioral science interventions and policies; describe steps and procedures for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs; and identify critical stakeholders for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions. 3 s.h.

PHHBP-712. Health Promo Intervention Plan. In this course, students will critically examine models and processes for the systematic planning of public health interventions in a variety of settings (e.g., medical, community).  Students will gain skills in needs assessment, the identification of behavioral and environmental determinants of public health problems, and using theory to guide the selection of public health intervention strategies.  Students will apply evidence-based approaches in the development of social and behavioral science interventions and become familiar with practical and ethical principles underlying public health program planning, implementation and evaluation. 3 s.h.

PHHBP-714. Health Promotion Res Methods. This course introduces students to research methods in health promotion and allows them to understand and evaluate common research methods used in H.P. research. Students learn techniques related to data collection by observation, interview and questionnaire, and adapt research techniques to vulnerable and medically underserved populations. 3 s.h.

PHHBP-718. Health Psychology. This course introduces MPH students to the principles and practices of Health Psychology, focusing first on learning theories of behavior change, discussing the case formulation process, and an intro to the fundamental aspects of health psychology treatments. The class then focuses on related and complicated cases - looking for connections between symptom classes and complementary treatment models and techniques. 3 s.h.

PMR-851. Physical Medicine & Rehab. Students will have contact with inpatients at Roper Rehabilitation Hospital. 1. Recognize diseases and aging processes that cause functional abnormalities. 2. Understand and utilize stages of recovery in functional disease such as stroke (Brunnstrom), brain injury (Rancho Los Amigos), spinal cord injury (ASIA), and orthopedic diseases and procedures. 3. Communicate functional goals and expectations to patients and caregivers. 4. Complete daily notes using a functionally-based template. 5. Understand the roles and scope of practice and interact with members of a rehabilitation team. 6. Understand patient factors and other requirements for the different rehab settings. 7. Prepare at least one patient care based project for presentation at a meeting or conference at the local, national, or international level. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PMR-880J. Physical Medicine & Rehab. Students will have contact with inpatients at Roper Rehabilitation Hospital. 1. Recognize diseases and aging processes that cause functional abnormalities. 2. Understand and utilize stages of recovery in functional disease such as stroke (Brunnstrom), brain injury (Rancho Los Amigos), spinal cord injury (ASIA), and orthopedic diseases and procedures. 3. Communicate functional goals and expectations to patients and caregivers. 4. Complete daily notes using a functionally-based template. 5. Understand the roles and scope of practice and interact with members of a rehabilitation team. 6. Understand patient factors and other requirements for the different rehab settings. 7. Prepare at least one patient care based project for presentation at a meeting or conference at the local, national, or international level. 2.5 s.h.

PMR-900A. Phys Med & Rehab Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PMR-970E. Physical Med & Rehab Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PSYCH-801. Psychiatry Clerkship. Introduces the student to the care of psychiatric patients. Learning objectives are to increase the students' ability to recognize, diagnose, and treat psychopathology, use empathic patient-centered interview techniques,  understand uses of psychotherapy, brain stimulation, and psychopharmacological agents, establish a supportive therapeutic relationship with patients, document and verbally present a psychiatric history and mental status examination, and work with inter-professional healthcare personnel. Students engage in direct patient responsibility with close supervision from house staff and faculty.  Experiences are supplemented with conferences, a workshop, simulation, and lectures. Prerequisite: successful completion of second year courses and a passing score on Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Exam. 8 s.h.

PSYCH-811J. Child and Adolescent Psych. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1.Diagnose various childhood psychiatric disorders in an acute care setting and describe methods used to stabilize these patients. 2. Interact effectively with families, children, and members of the treatment team. 3. Understand various treatment methods used in childhood psychiatric disorders including psychopharmacology, group therapy, and family therapy. 2.5 s.h.

PSYCH-812J. Geriatric Psychiatry. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Perform psychiatric work-up of an elderly person with dementia, affective illness, or delirium. 2. Perform clinical evaluation of cognitive capacity of an elderly person. 3. Assess activities of daily living in an elderly person. 4. Select appropriate psychopharmacological treatments and tailor treatment to a geriatric patient. 5. Understand and apply the use of the milieu and interpersonal techniques in treatment of a geriatric patient. 2.5 s.h.

PSYCH-813J. Substance Abuse Treatment Clin. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Perform an appropriate psychiatric evaluation for a patient with substance use disorder(s) with or without co-morbid psychiatric illness(es). 2. Describe treatment options for detoxification and rehabilitation for the following substances: Alcohol/benzodiazepines, opioids, cocaine, marijuana, nicotine. 3. Differentiate between a substance induced mood/psychotic disorder and a primary mood/psychotic disorder. 4. Describe the pharmacologic options for treating substance use disorders, including alcohol dependence, opioid withdrawal and dependence, and nicotine dependence. 5. Describe the medical complications that can occur with heavy alcohol, nicotine, opioid, and cocaine use. 2.5 s.h.

PSYCH-817J. VA Psychosomatic Consults. Students will be instructed on the basic principles of providing psychiatric consultation in a medical and surgical setting. 2.5 s.h.

PSYCH-818J. General Psychiatry. This selective introduces the student to the care of psychiatric patients and aims to improve the students' ability to recognize psychopathology, use interview techniques, correctly diagnose psychiatric disorders, appropriately use psychopharmacological agents, establish a supportive therapeutic relationship with patients, document and present a psychiatric history and mental status examination, and work with health care personnel. 2.5 s.h.

PSYCH-819J. Forensic Psychiatry. Forensic Psychiatry is a two week selective for third year medical students interested in Psychiatry. Students will spend time with the Physician on the Inpatient Psychiatry Unit as well as attending court sessions to observe testimony. Supervision is built into all components and learning objectives will focus on forensic psychiatry. 2.5 s.h.

PSYCH-840. Geriatric Psychiatry. 2.5 s.h.

PSYCH-857. Substance Abuse Treatment. Substance use disorders are some of the most frequently encountered clinical conditions seen in many medical and psychiatric practices. Many physicians feel that they have inadequate training in, and experience with, the treatment of substance use disorders as this is something that is often not emphasized in medical schools and residency programs. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity.              2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PSYCH-858. Geriatric Psychiatry. Students will work with psychiatry resident and geriatric psychiatrist on a unit specializing in the inpatient evaluation and treatment of dementia. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity.       2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PSYCH-860. Interventional Psychiatry. Many patients with neuropsychiatric disorders prove to be treatment-resistant, or have difficulty tolerating first line psychopharmacologic treatments.  These patients, particularly those with depression, are often referred for neuromodulatory interventions such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and deep brain stimulation (DBS). Psychiatry is in the early stages of formally recognizing and training interventionalists who perform specialized procedures. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to neuromodulation and the emerging field of Interventional Psychiatry. 5 s.h.

PSYCH-870. Forensic Psychiatry. Forensic Psychiatry is an exciting field that combines psychiatry and the law. Much of the rotation will focus on the treatment of psychiatric disorders in incarcerated individuals. Issues related to substance abuse, personality disorders, mood disorders, and malingering will be seen in many of the patients. In addition, it will provide students with an opportunity to learn about competency issues and other legal matters as they pertain to psychiatric patients. Students may have the opportunity to make rounds on Death Row and when possible attend court proceedings. An attending physician and forensic Fellow will provide the instruction. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PSYCH-871. Psychosomatic Med Consults. Consult Liaison Psychiatry focuses on the treatment of psychiatric disorders arising in medical and surgical patients. The majority of the experience involves consultation work on adult inpatients in the main hospital at MUSC, a transitional care unit, and Kindred, a tertiary care facility for patients with a high degree of morbidity located at McClennan Banks on Calhoun Street. It is an exciting opportunity to see the practical interface between medicine and psychiatry. This rotation teaches students skills they can use as a resident in any specialty. Diagnostic skills, interviewing techniques, and psychopharmacology are emphasized. An attending physician and 2 PGY-2 residents will supervise the student. Students will be given more autonomy in diagnostic evaluations and carrying out of therapeutic planning than during their third year clerkship. Overall, the rotation provides the student a very practical experience in a fun, yet challenging, way. 5 s.h.

PSYCH-874. Chid/Adolescent Psych Extern. The Child and Adolescent Unit (2N) in the Institute of Psychiatry offers students the ability to enhance their evaluation, treatment, management and knowledge of a variety of childhood/adolescent psychiatric disorders on an acute inpatient psychiatric unit. Students on this externship are required to participate at the level of an intern. This unit provides brief crisis stabilization of youth (5-17) with severe mood, behavior, anxiety, substance use, and thought disorders. The treatment team works closely with the patient, the family, and community providers to stabilize the crisis, improve coping skills and communication, and to ensure a smooth transition back to the community. Interdisciplinary Education: This externship not only benefits students interested in Psychiatry, but also those interested in: Pediatrics (including Developmental Pediatrics, Adolescent Medicine, and other pediatric subspecialties), Family Medicine, Neurology, and Pediatric Neurology. 5 s.h.

PSYCH-877. Adult Inpt Psych Externship. This elective in adult inpatient psychiatry offers students the ability to enhance their knowledge of psychiatric disorders and overall level of autonomy. During this month, students will be encouraged to experience and participate in patient care at the level of an intern. Students will be exposed to a variety of psychiatric conditions including substance use disorders, mood disorders, psychotic disorders, anxiety disorders, and personality disorders. The rotation is designed to complement the third year psychiatry core, not duplicate the experience. Supervision will be provided by an attending psychiatrist and resident. Even if a student is not pursuing a career in psychiatry, the rotation will teach the student skills necessary during the intern year regardless of specialty. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PSYCH-881. Combined Med/Psych. Students who rotate in the Internal Medicine and Psychiatry Combined Experience would participate in a variety of clinical activities with dually trained faculty. Students would potentially join inpatient medicine and/or psychiatry teams, consult psychiatry service, and outpatient clinics in Rutledge Tower, lOP, and VA. The attending provider for all of these rotations would have combined training in Internal Medicine and Psychiatry. 5 s.h.

PSYCH-887. Adult Inpt Psych Externship. The MS4 student will have the chance to enhance their knowledge of psychiatric disorders and treatment while rotating at our inpatient psychiatry unit (AnMed Health and Harris Psychiatry Hospital) locations. Students are expected to participate at the level of an intern and will be exposed to a variety of psychiatric conditions. This externship will not only benefit students interested in Psychiatry, but also those interested in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine (and subspecialities), Emergency Medicine, and other fields that do not offer an externship. 5 s.h.

PSYCH-900A. Psychiatry Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PSYCH-900E. Psychiatry Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

PSYCH-970E. Psych Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-851. Diagnostic Radiology. This course attempts to provide the student with various means to understand the importance of radiology in the patient's diagnostic evaluation through lecture, observation of the various modalities and interplay of departments in the reading room atmosphere.  Teaching film series and case presentations are also involved. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-854. Pediatric Radiology. The students will participate in the full spectrum of pediatric imaging through daily neonatal rounds, weekly teaching conferences with oncology and pediatric surgery as well as through the daily clinical work of plain files, ultrasound, CT, MRI and fluoroscopy. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-856. Interventional Radiology. General overview of the radiology subspecialty of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. Students will rotate through the fluoroscopic and computed tomography areas of the interventional radiology and become familiar with the disease states common to the practice and the techniques in which they are treated. This includes vascular, biliary, urologic problems as well as CT guided biopsies and abscess drainage. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-857. Neuroradiology. This rotation will provide the student with a broad overview of neuroradiology. It is designed specifically for students with an interest in Neurology, Neuropsychiatry, Neurosurgery and Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology and Radiology. The student will be expected to be an active participant during the month. Four days a week will be spent in the Neuroradiology reading room going over CT and MR studies with residents, fellows and attendings. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-858. Ultrasound-Radiology. This course is designed to provide students with a better understanding of the central role of diagnostic radiology in the evaluation and management of patients through participation in reading room readouts, lectures, case conferences/ presentations, online assignments, interactive labs, and observation of the ultrasound interpretation and procedures. This course is designed to introduce participants to the role of ultrasound in patient care including the appropriateness criteria for the use of diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound guided procedures. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-861. Breast Radiology. This course is designed to provide 4th year students with an understanding of diagnostic radiology as it pertains to breast imaging radiology and management of clinical breast disease. Students will participate in reading room readouts, lectures, case conferences/presentations, online assignments, and observation of the various imaging modalities and procedures in breast imaging. Students will attend breast radiology pathology concordance conference and breast tumor board. Students will spend the entire 2 or 4 week rotation in the breast imaging reading room and Hollings Cancer Center Mammography/Breast Imaging Suite.  2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-862. Musculoskeletal Imaging. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of diagnostic radiology as it pertains to musculoskeletal (MSK) radiology and the management of sports-related, degenerative, rheumatologic and orthopedic oncologic disease. Students will participate in reading room readouts, lectures, case conferences/presentations, on line assignments, and observation of the various imaging modalities and procedures in musculoskeletal imaging. Students will attend orthopedic tumor board. Students will spend the entire rotation in the MSK imaging reading in Rutledge Tower. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-865. Radiologic & Path Correlation. In this 4 week elective, the student will attend a variety of clinical tumor boards, and identify and direct the collection of current clinical cases which demonstrate outstanding correlation of imaging and pathology. Case documentation will include review of patient history, physical exam findings, imaging, gross and microscopic pathology findings, and diagnosis. Cases will be uploaded by the student into an internet based teaching file to be subsequently used by medical students, residents, and faculty in the departments of radiology and pathology. At least 2 cases should include complete information and thorough discussion of the radiologic and pathologic features of a disorder/disease process suitable for submission for publication as a case report.               2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-866. Radiology. This course is designed to provide medical students with a better understanding of the central role of diagnostic radiology in the evaluation and management of patients through participation in reading room readouts and observation of the various imaging modalities procedures. 2.5 s.h.

RAD-874. Diagnostic Radiology FLX. This course, a combination of online and in person activities, is designed to provide students with a better understanding of the central role of diagnostic radiology in the evaluation and management of patients through participation in reading room readouts, online lectures, case conferences/presentations, online assignments, and observation of the various Imaging modalities and procedures while affording some flexibility for residency interviews. Students will tailor their experience to their clinical interests by spending at least 4 days in 3 of our areas of specialty: Body, Cardiac, Chest, IR, MSK, Nuclear Medicine, Neuroradiology, Pediatrics, or Ultrasound. 5 s.h.

RAD-880J. Diagnostic Radiology. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Describe the spectrum of diagnostic imaging (e.g., ultrasound, CT, MR, NM, angiography, conventional radiology) and diagnostic and therapeutic image-guided interventional techniques. 2. Appreciate the breadth of medical knowledge necessary for imaging performance and interpretation and the spectrum of caregivers involved in the diagnostic and therapeutic imaging arena. 3. Appreciate the fundamental role and value of imaging to provide timely, accurate and actionable diagnostic information regarding a patient's medical condition. 4. Recognize the indications and appropriateness of imaging studies for common clinical problems. 5. Describe the appropriate sequencing of exams and the limitations of diagnostic imaging tests, including cost-effectiveness of imaging studies. 6. Discuss basic test concepts of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive value and how the results of a diagnostic test affect the clinical probability of disease likelihood. 7. Participate in imaging interpretation, including basic study identification, viewing, and interpretation, basic normal anatomy and pathology as depicted on common studies. 8. Apply basic skills to evaluate basic imaging studies. 2.5 s.h.

RAD-882J. Radiology. This selective is to expose the third year medical student to basic diagnostic radiology. The student will observe radiologists and radiological technicians both in the inpatient and outpatient arenas. The student should have a better understanding of what a radiologist's daily activities are. 2.5 s.h.

RAD-900A. Radiology Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-900E. Radiology Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RAD-970E. Radiology Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity.  2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RDONC-800. Radiation Oncology. Introduces students to the care of cancer patients.  Emphasis is placed in the role of radiation and the multi-disciplinary nature of the management of malignant disease. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RDONC-880J. Radiation Oncology. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Assess the need for radiation in the management of malignancies. 2. Demonstrate working with a multi-disciplinary cancer team. 3. Demonstrate a fundamental knowledge about radiation treatment planning. 4. Demonstrate proficiency in examining patients. 5. Formulate a treatment program for care. 2.5 s.h.

RDONC-900A. Rad Onc Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

RDONC-900E. Rad Onc Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 5 s.h.

RDONC-970E. Rad Onc Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity.  2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

SURG-801. Surgery Clerkship. Introduces the students to the care of surgical patients. Emphasis is placed on establishing the diagnosis, learning the pathophysiology of surgical diseases, participating in the treatment of surgical patients, understanding the means to support patients before, during, and after surgery, and understanding the impact of surgical illness on the patient and family. Students engage in direct patient contact with house staff and faculty supervision. Experiences are supplemented with learning materials, conferences and small group discussions. Prerequisite: successful completion of second year courses and a passing score on Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Exam. 8 s.h.

SURG-801J. General Surgery. This selective introduces the student to the care of surgical patients. Emphasis is placed on establishing the diagnosis, learning the pathophysiology of surgical diseases, participating in the treatment of surgical patients, understanding the means to support patients before, during, and after surgery, and understanding the impact of surgical illness on the patient and family. 2.5 s.h.

SURG-830. Adult Cardiac Surg Ext ASE. Students will be assigned to an attending on the cardiac surgery service and may serve as subinterns on the cardiac surgery service.  This is a good opportunity for one on one time with an attending surgeon. Recommended for students interested in Intensive Care, Cardiology, General or Cardiac Surgery, Internal Medicine. Expect long hours but these are more than rewarded with an outstanding educational experience. 5 s.h.

SURG-832. Night Trauma Surgery ASE. Students will participate in the Night Emergency Trauma Service as members of the night float team. Students will remain in house from 6 PM until 6 AM nightly from Monday through Friday nights. This service is recommended to students interested in general surgery, as well as students interested in emergency medicine and primary care. 5 s.h.

SURG-833. General Thoracic Surgery ASE. Students will work with patients cared for by the thoracic surgeons within the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery and see patients in inpatient, ambulatory and OR settings. Recommended for students interested in careers in Surgery, Internal Medicine, Radiation Oncology, and adult primary care. 5 s.h.

SURG-834. Pediatric Surg Externship ASE. Students will serve as members of the patient care team for patients on the pediatric surgical service interacting with the attendings and residents from the pediatric surgical service on a daily basis. Students will participate in outpatient clinics, the operating room, and rounds with residents and attending surgeons. Students will also participate in the management of inpatient consults and assessment of pediatric burn/trauma patients. 5 s.h.

SURG-835. Plastic Surgery Externshi ASE. Students will participate in plastic surgery patient care including the inpatient and outpatient setting with one of the fulltime plastic surgery faculty. The student146s daily activities will be assigned by the academic chief plastic surgery resident.  And will include activities such as plastic surgery didactic case and visiting professor conferences as well as inpatient and ambulatory patient activities. Recommended for students interested in Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Dermatology, ENT, Ophthalmology, and Orthopedic Surgery. 5 s.h.

SURG-836. Surgical Critical Car Ext ASE. Students will be assigned to serve as subinterns in the surgical intensive care unit. Very close supervision will be provided by surgery and anesthesia residents assigned to the unit. This rotation is recommended for students with an interest in anesthesia or in a surgical field. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity.         2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

SURG-837. Surgical Oncology ASE. The student will shadow an attending surgeon in the division of surgical oncology and participate in evaluation and care of patients in both inpatient and ambulatory settings. The student will attend the appropriate tumor board conferences.  This rotation is recommended for patients interested in general surgery, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, geriatrics, radiology, and primary care. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity.  2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

SURG-838. Transplant Surg Externshi ASE. Students will be assigned to an attending surgeon in the Division of Transplant Surgery. Student will be exposed to all aspect of renal and hepatic replacement therapies as well as the care of patients with renal and liver failure. Opportunity for outcome research is available. Recommended for students interested in Surgery, Internal Medicine, Nephrology, and other Primary Care Specialties. 5 s.h.

SURG-839. Trauma & Acute Care Surg ASE. Students will serve as active care givers on the trauma and emergency surgery service. Supervision will be provided by upper level housestaff and attending surgeons. This service is recommended for students interested in emergency medicine, primary care, orthopedic surgery, and general surgery. 5 s.h.

SURG-840. Peripheral Vasc Surg Ext ASE. This externship offers students the opportunity to function as a member of the team and be responsible for many of the duties of an intern under the direct guidance and supervision of house staff and attending staff. Depending on clinical volume and anticipated training opportunities, the student may be assigned to either the vascular service at RH Johnson VA or at Ashley River Tower. In addition, if a student manifests a high level of interest in vascular surgery and communicates with the coordinator well in advance of the rotation, 3-5 days of the rotation may be arranged to interact primarily with MUSC clinical faculty at Roper Hospital. This course is designed primarily for students interested in surgery who are considering post-graduate training in general surgery or vascular surgery residencies. 5 s.h.

SURG-841. Community General Surgery ASE. Students will work one on one with a local community surgeon. A wide variety of practice types are represented by the surgeons with whom our students rotate. All hold clinical appointments in the Department of Surgery. This rotation is recommended for students interested in primary care fields, internal medicine, and other non-surgical disciplines. Overall, the rotation affords the student with a fascinating educational opportunity.              2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

SURG-845. Vascular Surgery ASE. Students will spend time with vascular surgeons as they perform their daily functions. Students will participate in patient care based on their level of competency and at the direction of their surgery attending. Students will see patients with vascular surgeon in the office, cath lab, hospital wards and operating rooms. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

SURG-851. Plastic Surgery ASE. Students will participate in plastic surgery patient care including inpatient and outpatient settings with the assigned attending physician. Students will be involved In operative cases on a daily basis with exposure to all aspects of reconstructive and cosmetic surgery. 2.5 s.h.

SURG-852. Community Surgery ASE. Students will work one on one with a local  Anderson community surgeon participating in his  clinical practice in both the office and the  operating suite. The student will actively  participate in the surgical care of patients.  This course is designed to allow students  interested in a surgical career to get more  exposure to general surgery. 5 s.h.

SURG-873. GI Surgery Externship ASE. This course prepares students for a career in surgery with emphasis on clinical skills and judgment.  Students have the opportunity to complete this rotation on GI surgery, trauma surgery, surgical oncology or vascular surgery. 5 s.h.

SURG-900A. Surgery Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

SURG-900E. Surgery Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

SURG-970E. Surgery Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

UROL-853. Urology Externship ASE. This course is for students considering urology as  a career. Students will rotate in both inpatient  and outpatient clinical areas at MUSC and the VA  hospital, managing complex urologic conditions  and providing a detailed look at what a career in  urologic surgery will entail. Service guidelines  will be emailed two weeks before the actual  rotation begins. Students must receive approval  from the course director to enroll in blocks 1-5,  which are reserved for students choosing Urology  as their specialty. 5 s.h.

UROL-854. Urology. This course will provide fourth year medical students an opportunity to spend time with a urology attending physician in his office, in the hospital and in the operating room. The student will be exposed to common urological problems seen in primary care medicine. 5 s.h.

UROL-880J. Urology. LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this clinical rotation, students will be able to:  1. Understand and assist in the diagnosis and treatment of common genitourinary conditions (e.g. nephrolithiasis, bladder, kidney, prostate malignancy, voiding dysfunction, female incontinence and prolapse, erectile dysfunction) 2. Understand and assist in implementing the pre-operative evaluation and post-operative care of genitourinary surgical patients. 3. Comprehend the outpatient management of common genitourinary conditions. 4. Recognize the indications for placement of, and removal of, urological catheters, drains, and tubes. 2.5 s.h.

UROL-900A. Urology Elective. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved electives for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

UROL-900E. Urology Externship. This rotation includes all non-MUSC pre-approved externships for 4th year students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.

UROL-970E. Urology Research. Research based elective for 4th year medical students. 2.5 or 5.0 Variable credit hours.