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CHP Course Descriptions

Bulletin

AFN-535. Independent Study. Students study a topic related to nurse anesthesia clinical practice, education, or policy under the supervision of an AFN faculty member.  1-11 var. s.h.

 

AFN-642. Anesthesia Practicum III. A continuation of AFN-641 with special emphasis on developing the set-up and management of complex anesthetic cases and problems and developing greater responsibility in anesthetic management and independent learning. 11 s.h.

 

AFN-643. Anesthesia Practicum IV. A continuation of AFN-642. The student develops total anesthetic management with minimal supervision from the anesthesiologist or the certified registered nurse anesthetist consulting with the anesthesiologist. The student is involved in evaluating self and generating discussion of same. 11 s.h.

 

AFN-647. Research Project III. The third in a series of three seminar courses that requires students to incorporate the fundamentals of research into the final evidence-based research project. The series begins following IRB approval and culminates with a scholarly paper and plan for the dissemination of researched results. 1 s.h. Summer.

 

AFN-682. Research Seminar II.

 

AFN-683. Research Seminar III. A continuation of AFN-682. 1 s.h.

 

AFN-800. DNAP Seminar I. This course is first in a series of four seminar courses that introduces the student to the role of the doctoral prepared nurse anesthetist in the healthcare arena.  It includes concepts of professional wellness and ethical decision-making.  Students begin planning for their final capstone project.  2 s.h.

 

AFN-802. DNAP Seminar II. This course serves as a continuation of the DNAP Seminar Series. It includes the integration of organizational change concepts, leadership, ethics, and economics into the capstone project. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-803. DNAP Seminar III. This course is a continuation of the DNAP Seminar Series. It focuses on the application of concepts of continuous quality assurance/quality improvement to the clinical process. Students will be working on the continued development and implementation of the capstone project. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-804. DNAP Seminar IV. This is the final course in the DNAP Seminar Series. It includes the final synthesis of the components of the capstone project including analysis of the data, discussion of the results, policy implications, and a plan for dissemination of the project. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-805. Teaching and Learning. This course focuses on the components of effecting teaching and learning.  The emphasis is on the application of learning theories; designing effective models of teaching; and developing innovative educational experiences that facilitate achievement of desired learning outcomes. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-806. Foundations in Healthcare Policy. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the role of the healthcare provider in understanding and influencing healthcare policy. The content initially focuses on the macroscopic view of policy-making, legislation, and regulation. Then learners are engaged in the analysis of policy and how to become influential when engaging policymakers. 3 S.H.

 

AFN-807. Principles of Pain Management. This course is a foundational pain management course that focuses on all aspects of chronic and acute pain management. Includes concepts in interventional pain management, ultrasound, pharmacotherapuetics, and complimentary techniques. Learners will have hands-on experiences using ultrasound technology. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-809. Mgmt Prin for Nurse Anes Prac. This course includes management principles relevant to leaders in nurse anesthesia. It includes content on financial management principles; billing/payment strategies; efficient deployment of resources; and contract development and negotiation. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-811. Princ of Evidence-Based Prac. This course focuses on the application of analytic methods for searching, selecting, evaluating, and synthesizing the literature. Includes a focus on types/levels of evidence and application of the best evidence to clinical practice. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-813. Clin Sim in Crisis Management. This course is a high-fidelity simulation lab course that applies theories of simulation to clinical management of low occurrence, high-risk anesthetic crisis. Emphasis will be on evidence-based decision-making and critical thinking skills. 1 s.h.

 

AFN-815. Prof Issues Seminar. This course provides the entry-level nurse anesthesia student with a foundational knowledge of the scope of practice of nurse anesthetists, an introduction to professional organizations, and the history of the profession. 1 s.h.

 

AFN-817. Chemistry and Physics of Anesthesia. The emphasis of this course is on developing an understanding of measurement, basic physics principles, gas laws, states of matter, solutions, electricity, fire, and radiation safety, organic compounds, and the anesthesia machine. Drug calculations, clinical application of gas laws and chemical reactions, breathing circuits, and patient monitors will be covered along with the operating principles of the anesthesia machine. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-819. Human Anatomy for Nurse Anes. This course is a comprehensive review of human cadaver anatomy to include major muscles, skin, bones and joints, internal organs, vascular system, the central nervous system, and major nerves. It includes a full dissection laboratory with an emphasis on airway anatomy, neurovascular system, and internal organs. 5 s.h.

 

AFN-820. Information Systems in Hc Delivery. This course focuses on the development of knowledge and skills to use information management systems for clinical decision-making, implementing quality improvement initiatives, and evaluating the impact on patient care. The course will address legal and legislative issues impacting healthcare information systems.  3 s.h.

 

AFN-821. Adv Health and Phys Assessment. This course focuses on the integration of patient history and physical assessment in the development of an evidence-based, patient centered plan of care. Students will acquire needed skills that incorporates information from the physical, psychological, social, functional, and environmental domains.  It includes diagnostic reasoning, risk assessment, and hands-on skill acquisition. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-823. Research Mthds for Nurse Anesthesia. This course focuses on the acquisition of knowledge and application of knowledge of research design and methods. Course topics include: justifying a research proposal, sampling techniques, research ethics, study design, statistics and research ethics. Students will use the knowledge acquired in this course to write a research proposal and submit an IRB application. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-825. Adv Physiology and Pathophysiology. This course addresses the study of integrative regulatory mechanisms responsible for maintenance of homeostasis in the normal human and the alterations that occur in these mechanisms leading to specific disease processes. Understanding the mechanisms of disease is essential to the role of the health care professional in determining the appropriate therapy and/or surgical interventions for the patient. 5 s.h.

 

AFN-827. Basic Prin of Anes Practice. This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of nurse anesthesia practice. The emphasis is on diverse patient populations along with basic monitoring and the implications of selected surgical techniques. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-829. Adv Princ of Anes Practice. This course provides in-depth examination of complex patient populations and anesthesia clinical topics. Includes exploration of advanced monitoring, diagnostic, and other technical modalities. 5 s.h.

 

AFN-831. Clinical Simulation I. The purpose of the course is to provide nurse anesthesia students with foundational cognitive and psychomotor skills necessary to perform airway assessment and management plan for patients undergoing general anesthesia.  The emphasis is on acquisition of nurse anesthesia technical skills and clinical decision-making utilizing evidence based practice principles applied to simulations of both low and high fidelity. 2 s.h. 

 

AFN-832. Clinical Simulation II. The purpose of the course is to provide nurse anesthesia students with advanced cognitive and psychomotor skills necessary to perform clinical anesthesia management to includes case plans for patients undergoing general anesthesia.  In addition to the reinforcement of skills demonstrated in prior AFN-535. Independent Study. Students study a topic related to nurse anesthesia clinical practice, education, or policy under the supervision of an AFN faculty member.  1-11 var. s.h.

 

AFN-642. Anesthesia Practicum III. A continuation of AFN-641 with special emphasis on developing the set-up and management of complex anesthetic cases and problems and developing greater responsibility in anesthetic management and independent learning. 11 s.h.

 

AFN-643. Anesthesia Practicum IV. A continuation of AFN-642. The student develops total anesthetic management with minimal supervision from the anesthesiologist or the certified registered nurse anesthetist consulting with the anesthesiologist. The student is involved in evaluating self and generating discussion of same. 11 s.h.

 

AFN-647. Research Project III. The third in a series of three seminar courses that requires students to incorporate the fundamentals of research into the final evidence-based research project. The series begins following IRB approval and culminates with a scholarly paper and plan for the dissemination of researched results. 1 s.h. Summer.

 

AFN-682. Research Seminar II.

 

AFN-683. Research Seminar III. A continuation of AFN-682. 1 s.h.

 

AFN-800. DNAP Seminar I. This course is first in a series of four seminar courses that introduces the student to the role of the doctoral prepared nurse anesthetist in the healthcare arena.  It includes concepts of professional wellness and ethical decision-making.  Students begin planning for their final capstone project.  2 s.h.

 

AFN-802. DNAP Seminar II. This course serves as a continuation of the DNAP Seminar Series. It includes the integration of organizational change concepts, leadership, ethics, and economics into the capstone project. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-803. DNAP Seminar III. This course is a continuation of the DNAP Seminar Series. It focuses on the application of concepts of continuous quality assurance/quality improvement to the clinical process. Students will be working on the continued development and implementation of the capstone project. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-804. DNAP Seminar IV. This is the final course in the DNAP Seminar Series. It includes the final synthesis of the components of the capstone project including analysis of the data, discussion of the results, policy implications, and a plan for dissemination of the project. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-805. Teaching and Learning. This course focuses on the components of effecting teaching and learning.  The emphasis is on the application of learning theories; designing effective models of teaching; and developing innovative educational experiences that facilitate achievement of desired learning outcomes. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-806. Foundations in Healthcare Policy. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the role of the healthcare provider in understanding and influencing healthcare policy. The content initially focuses on the macroscopic view of policy-making, legislation, and regulation. Then learners are engaged in the analysis of policy and how to become influential when engaging policymakers. 3 S.H.

 

AFN-807. Principles of Pain Management. This course is a foundational pain management course that focuses on all aspects of chronic and acute pain management. Includes concepts in interventional pain management, ultrasound, pharmacotherapuetics, and complimentary techniques. Learners will have hands-on experiences using ultrasound technology. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-809. Mgmt Prin for Nurse Anes Prac. This course includes management principles relevant to leaders in nurse anesthesia. It includes content on financial management principles; billing/payment strategies; efficient deployment of resources; and contract development and negotiation. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-811. Princ of Evidence-Based Prac. This course focuses on the application of analytic methods for searching, selecting, evaluating, and synthesizing the literature. Includes a focus on types/levels of evidence and application of the best evidence to clinical practice. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-813. Clin Sim in Crisis Management. This course is a high-fidelity simulation lab course that applies theories of simulation to clinical management of low occurrence, high-risk anesthetic crisis. Emphasis will be on evidence-based decision-making and critical thinking skills. 1 s.h.

 

AFN-815. Prof Issues Seminar. This course provides the entry-level nurse anesthesia student with a foundational knowledge of the scope of practice of nurse anesthetists, an introduction to professional organizations, and the history of the profession. 1 s.h.

 

AFN-817. Chemistry and Physics of Anesthesia. The emphasis of this course is on developing an understanding of measurement, basic physics principles, gas laws, states of matter, solutions, electricity, fire, and radiation safety, organic compounds, and the anesthesia machine. Drug calculations, clinical application of gas laws and chemical reactions, breathing circuits, and patient monitors will be covered along with the operating principles of the anesthesia machine. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-819. Human Anatomy for Nurse Anes. This course is a comprehensive review of human cadaver anatomy to include major muscles, skin, bones and joints, internal organs, vascular system, the central nervous system, and major nerves. It includes a full dissection laboratory with an emphasis on airway anatomy, neurovascular system, and internal organs. 5 s.h.

 

AFN-820. Information Systems in Hc Delivery. This course focuses on the development of knowledge and skills to use information management systems for clinical decision-making, implementing quality improvement initiatives, and evaluating the impact on patient care. The course will address legal and legislative issues impacting healthcare information systems.  3 s.h.

 

AFN-821. Adv Health and Phys Assessment. This course focuses on the integration of patient history and physical assessment in the development of an evidence-based, patient centered plan of care. Students will acquire needed skills that incorporates information from the physical, psychological, social, functional, and environmental domains.  It includes diagnostic reasoning, risk assessment, and hands-on skill acquisition. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-823. Research Mthds for Nurse Anesthesia. This course focuses on the acquisition of knowledge and application of knowledge of research design and methods. Course topics include: justifying a research proposal, sampling techniques, research ethics, study design, statistics and research ethics. Students will use the knowledge acquired in this course to write a research proposal and submit an IRB application. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-825. Adv Physiology and Pathophysiology. This course addresses the study of integrative regulatory mechanisms responsible for maintenance of homeostasis in the normal human and the alterations that occur in these mechanisms leading to specific disease processes. Understanding the mechanisms of disease is essential to the role of the health care professional in determining the appropriate therapy and/or surgical interventions for the patient. 5 s.h.

 

AFN-827. Basic Prin of Anes Practice. This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of nurse anesthesia practice. The emphasis is on diverse patient populations along with basic monitoring and the implications of selected surgical techniques. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-829. Adv Princ of Anes Practice. This course provides in-depth examination of complex patient populations and anesthesia clinical topics. Includes exploration of advanced monitoring, diagnostic, and other technical modalities. 5 s.h.

 

AFN-831. Clinical Simulation I. The purpose of the course is to provide nurse anesthesia students with foundational cognitive and psychomotor skills necessary to perform airway assessment and management plan for patients undergoing general anesthesia.  The emphasis is on acquisition of nurse anesthesia technical skills and clinical decision-making utilizing evidence based practice principles applied to simulations of both low and high fidelity. 2 s.h. 

 

AFN-832. Clinical Simulation II. The purpose of the course is to provide nurse anesthesia students with advanced cognitive and psychomotor skills necessary to perform clinical anesthesia management to includes case plans for patients undergoing general anesthesia.  In addition to the reinforcement of skills demonstrated in prior courses, emphasis remains on acquisition of nurse anesthesia technical skills and evidence-based clinical decision making utilizing low and high fidelity simulation. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-833. Clinical Simulation III. The emphasis is on acquisition of nurse anesthesia technical skills and clinical decision-making utilizing a combination of both low and high fidelity simulation.  For example, students will negotiate evidence-based simulated surgical procedures via an online simulation program (low-fidelity) as well as demonstrate hands-on patient care within a simulated operating room with a computerized patient mannequin (high fidelity).  In addition to the reinforcement of skills demonstrated in prior courses, this course includes insertion of invasive monitoring catheters. 1 s.h.

 

AFN-835. Advanced Pharmacology I. This course focuses on the basic and advanced clinical concepts of pharmacology and medication administration for the healthcare professional. Topics to be covered will include pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, pharmacology of the autonomic nervous system, pharmacology of the respiratory system, cardiac pharmacology, endocrine pharmacology and other topics relevant to pharmacology and medication administration. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-836. Advanced Pharmacology II. This course provides an exploration of the advanced clinical concepts of pharmacology for the anesthesia provider. The focus will be on the clinical application and utilization of anesthesia drugs and other medications relevant to anesthesia during the perioperative period. Application of principles of pharmacology to formulate proper strategies for providing an anesthetic while minimizing adverse effect will be utilized. 4 s.h.

 

AFN-838. Introduction to Clinical Anesthesia. Introduction to Clinical Anesthesia offers an in depth survey of the anesthetic management of diverse clinical topics. Topics include, but are not limited to, ambulatory surgery, ENT, Non-Operating Room Anesthesia (NORA), orthopedics, and transplant anesthesia. The focus of this course is to prepare the student for cases that are commonly encountered in clinical practice. The content is delivered via lecture, clinical case studies, and class discussion. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-841. Anesthesia Practicum I. First in a series of five clinical courses that develop proficiency in nurse anesthesia practice with an emphasis on integrating prior knowledge to decision-making and case management for various patient populations in the clinical area. 5 s.h.

 

AFN-842. Anesthesia Practicum II. Second in a series of five clinical courses that develop proficiency in nurse anesthesia practice. Emphasis on evidence-based practice and integration of knowledge to decision-making and case management for various patient populations. 10 s.h.

 

AFN-843. Anesthesia Practicum III. Third in a series of five clinical courses that develop proficiency in nurse anesthesia practice. Emphasis on complex case management and increasing autonomy and skill in the perioperative period. 10 s.h.

 

AFN-844. Anesthesia Practicum IV. Fourth in a series of five clinical courses that develop proficiency in nurse anesthesia practice. Emphasis on analyzing impacts of research on clinical practice and on increasing efficiency in decision-making and case management for various patient populations. 10 s.h.

 

AFN-845. Anesthesia Practicum V. Fifth in a series of five clinical courses that develop proficiency in nurse anesthesia practice. Emphasis is placed on autonomy and leadership in clinical practice. 10 s.h.

 

AFN-861. Foundations in Leadership. This course is an introduction healthcare  leadership. Students will develop an  understanding of the value of transformative  leadership in healthcare through critical  exploration of the literature. Students will  engage with leaders in administration, education,  policy, and research. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-871. Managing Change in Healthcare. This course will focus on the issues involved in  leading strategic change in complex health care  organizations. Five major areas will be explored:  the key elements of interventions and modes of  behavior used by change agents (including the  skills and qualities of successful change agents)  and specific examples of successful change and  implementation efforts. The narrative of  strategic change, management of uncertainty, the  importance of interpersonal skills and emotional  intelligence in the change process, the role of  individuals, teams, and consultants in leading  change will be topics of discussion. 3 s.h.

 

CVP-610. Pharmacology for Perfusion. This course presents the fundamental principles of pharmacology necessary for an understanding of the mechanisms of action of drugs and knowledge for their rational and effective use or monitoring. Principles which support the clinical applications of drugs to dynamic patients, who exist in a variety of health states, will be shared. Principles include pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenetics, and introductory therapeutics.  A discussion of the impact of aging and disease on drug safety and the drug development process will be made. Interprofessional experiences will be used to help student gain exposure to many of the challenges related to drug therapy, and team-based problem solving skills will be applied. 4 s.h.

 

CVP-700. Clinical Monitoring. This course is designed to give the perfusion student an understanding of how patients are monitored in the health care setting. Specific focus will be in the arena of cardiac services in and outside the operating room and areas where extracorporeal services are utilized. This course presents the history and theory related to the various physiologic monitoring parameters encountered in the clinical setting, along with the physics and principles of operation of the instrumentation commonly employed in the care of cardiac surgery patients or any patient requiring care via extracorporeal technology. 4 s.h.

 

CVP-702. Perfusion Technology I. This course is designed to give the beginning student a practical and theoretical orientation to the environment of extracorporeal circulation. This course presents the history, basic components, equipment, and physiology related to extracorporeal circulation. The students will be exposed to ethical issues facing health care providers in today's environment. 4 s.h.

 

CVP-703. Perfusion Technology Ii/Simulation Lab. This course will focus on clinical devices used for cardiopulmonary bypass and the development of key clinical skills used on a daily basis in clinical perfusion.  Students are taught equipment selection, set-up, and steps required for the safe operation of a life support system in a simulated operating room environment. 5 SH

 

CVP-704. Research Methodology. This course provides a background on general principles and issues in clinical research design. These are explored through the formulation of the research objective and the research hypothesis and the specification of the study population, the experimental unit, and the outcome variables. This course integrates core clinical perfusion principles to provide experience in the development and critique of the methodological aspects of clinical research protocols and the clinical research literature. Assigned readings are drawn from contemporary perfusion scientific literature. 3 s.h.

 

CVP-706. Perioperative Blood Mgmt. This course is designed to introduce the cardiovascular perfusion student to blood management strategies employed during cardiac surgery. Each lecture will focus, in depth, on the principles and practices of blood conservation and autotransfusion during extracorporeal support.  A review of hematology and coagulation monitoring will be included as part of the introduction to this topic. 2 s.h.

 

CVP-708. Pathophysiology for Perfusion Technology. This course is designed to introduce the cardiovascular perfusion student to the essential physiological elements of perfusion practice. Each lecture will focus, in depth, on the pathological conditions associated with cardiothoracic surgery and extracorporeal support.  Specific organ systems and biochemical responses to cardiopulmonary bypass in the aging population will be investigated. 4 SH

 

CVP-710. Fundamentals of Clinical Acid Based Chem. This course is designed to give the beginning student the principles of acid-base physiology and the interpretation and treatment of clinical acid-base disorders. 2 SH

 

CVP-712. Principles and Practices of Perfusion Te. This course prepares the student for clinical experience. The goal of this course is to expose perfusion students to extracorporeal techniques using combinations of lecture, independent research and in-vivo lab.  Students will be provided with the objectives of the lab. Experience with the techniques, collecting data in an organized and consistent matter, writing lab reports and participating in discussion gives students the opportunity to comprehend various extracorporeal techniques. 5 SH

 

CVP-714. Cardiac Assist Devices. This course introduces student to the advanced practice associated with cardiac assist devices. Selection, operation and monitoring of various cardiac assist devices including both FDA approved and investigational devices.  Other areas of focus will include patient education, community education, surgical coordination, clinical visits and managing VAD databases and clinical trials, including data analysis for presentations. 2 SH

 

CVP-716. Seminar I. This course will include case presentation and discussion of current practices and techniques in extracorporeal circulation from clinical rotations to introduce the students to the multiplicity of perfusion techniques from around the country. 1 SH

 

CVP-718. Pathophysiology. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the basic principles of human physiologic function.  Organ, tissue and cellular function is integrated through exploration of the major elements of overall homeostasis (i.e., health).  Emphasis is placed on the regulatory mechanisms, which integrate the functional systemsof the body and maintain the adult organism in a dynamic steady state.  Basic concepts of normal function are reinforced by consideration of many clinical and pathophysiological applications. 5 s.h.

 

CVP-719. Post Professional Pediatric Perfusion. This course reviews the anatomical and  physiological characteristics of congenital heart  defects and their implications for the conduct of  perfusion.  Special considerations in the conduct  of perfusion for congenital heart surgery are  discussed and modeled. 1 s.h.

 

CVP-720. Advanced Pediatric Perfusion. This course is designed to provide the student with students the anatomical and physiological characteristics of congenital heart defects, surgical repair techniques and the implications for cardiopulmonary bypass .Each week a series of related congenital heart defects are reviewed. Specific perfusion techniques related to the conduct of perfusion for congenital heart surgery will be discussed. 2 SH

 

CVP-722. Perfusion Simulation. This course introduces student to the advanced practice associated with cardiac assist devices. Selection, operation and monitoring of various cardiac assist devices including both FDA approved and investigational devices.  Other areas of focus will include patient education, community education, surgical coordination, clinical visits and managing VAD databases and clinical trials, including data analysis for presentations. 2 SH

 

CVP-724. Quality Improvement and Informatics. This course provides students with an understanding of quality management and performance improvement. This will include quality assessment, risk management, outcomes assessment, and benchmarking. The course focuses primarily on providing students with the necessary knowledge and skills for understanding systems improvement and then participating and leading quality improvement (QI) efforts. Students also gain knowledge of the importance of measuring and managing service excellence and patient satisfaction. This course also provides students with an introduction to health care information systems, with an emphasis on clinical information systems. Students are introduced to different types of clinical and administrative information systems used in health care today. 2 SH

 

CVP-726. Evidence-Based Medicine. This course will review research based on the  classifications of evidenced based medicine and  will include examples from the cardiovascular  surgery and perfusion literature. 2 SH

 

CVP-728. Leadership and Health Services Delivery. This course introduces students to the management  of health care facilities.  Students gain an  understanding of the major functions of  management, governance, organizational  structures, accreditation/licensure processes,  and reimbursement issues in health care  organizations.  Students will become familiar  with and understand the importance of the  principles of management including planning,  organizing, controlling, directing, and staffing  in order to offer health care services. The  course will also demonstrate the basic concepts  and issues associated with the management and  regulations of health care services delivery, and  explore the impact of contemporary public policy  issues confronting the health care system. 2 SH

 

CVP-730. Pathophysiology of Aging. This course presents a survey of the concepts of  human disease as part of the aging process. It  includes a study of immunological defense  mechanisms, acute and chronic inflammation,  repair mechanisms, modes of injury, diseases of  development and growth, and blood disorders and  neoplasia. 1 SH

 

CVP-760. Clinical Experience I. This course is designed to provide the perfusion student an introduction to the operating room and various clinical arenas within the hospital.  The student will learn to conduct diagnostic work-up procedures for cardiovascular diseases and other organ systems.  The student will integrate their knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology into the assessment and management of the patient undergoing cardiac surgery.  The student will also develop their clinical skills in choosing appropriate CPB circuitry, assembling and priming the components, and conducting cardiopulmonary bypass. 6 SH

 

CVP-762. Clinical Experience II A. Clinical Experience II (CE II) is the major  clinical course for senior Perfusion students.   Students have successfully completed Clinical  Experience I, Devices and Principles and  Practices where they have acquired the skills of  patient work-up, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)  techniques, set-up and prime, as well as all  didactic work and physiology, which includes  intensive in vivo laboratories. CE II will begin  developing the student's skills in management of the patient before, during, and after CPB.  6 s.h.

 

CVP-763. Clinical Experience II B. Clinical Experience II (CE II) is the major  clinical course for senior Perfusion Students.   Student have successfully completed Clinical  Experience I, Devices and Principles and  Practices where they have acquired the skills of  patient work-up, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)  techniques, set-up and prime, as well as all  didactic work and physiology, which includes  intensive in vivo laboratories.  CE II will begin  developing the student's skills in management of  the patient before during, and after CPB. 6 s.h.

 

CVP-764. Clinical Experience IIIA. This advanced course is designed to complete the  student's clinical experience. The student will  be expected to perform as though unsupervised in  all routine cardiovascular procedures and will  operate more complex devices. The student will be  on call for weekend and emergency procedures. 6  SH

 

CVP-765. Clinical Exerience IIIB. This advanced course is designed to complete the  student's clinical experience. The student will  be expected to perform as though unsupervised in  all routine cardiovascular procedures and will  operate more complex devices. Students will  choose either a leadership, pediatrics perfusion  or cardiac assist track. 6 SH

 

CVP-770. Masters Research Project II. In this course the student develops a research project relating to cardiovascular perfusion resulting in a substantive paper that involves original collection or treatment of data and/or results in a research paper. Students select a clinical hypothesis to test and complete a research proposal in a topic pertinent to perfusion. The capstone project must evidence scholarly and/or professional analysis informed by the sustained and appropriate application of analytical methodologies. The final product of the research project must be a paper of publishable quality. This research project involves original research and exemplifies an original contribution to scholarship.  3 SH

 

CVP-771. Masters Research III. In this final research course, the student submits their research project for presentation and publication. The course requirements will include editorial changes suggested during peer review process. The capstone project will be completed by submitting the final paper for publication in a peer-reviewed perfusion related journal. 3 SH

 

CVP-772. Masters Research Project I. This course provides a background on general  principles and issues in clinical research  design. These are explored through the  formulation of the research objective and the  research hypothesis and the specification of the  study population, the experimental unit, and the  outcome variables. This course integrates on core  clinical perfusion principles to provide  experience in the development and critique of the  methodological aspects of clinical research  protocols and the clinical research literature.  Assigned readings are drawn from contemporary  perfusion scientific literature. 3 SH

 

CVP-773. Masters Research Project II. In this course the student develops a research  project relating to cardiovascular perfusion  resulting in a substantive paper that involves  original collection or treatment of data and/or  results ins a research. The final product of a  research project is a paper of publishable  quality. This research project involves original  research and exemplifies an original contribution  to scholarship.4 SH

 

CVP-774. Masters Research III. In this final research course, the student submits  their research project for presentation and  publication.  The course requirements will  include editorial changes suggested during peer  review process.  The capstone project will be  completed by submitting the final paper for  publication in a peer-reviewed perfusion related  journal.

 

DHA-800. Organizational Behavior. This course will assist students in developing a framework for thinking about the organizational world of healthcare and its complexity. The specific emphasis will be health services organizations and management research, with an emphasis on organizational theory and organizational behavior. Organization theory is a set of approaches to the understanding of how organizations form, survive and grow, interact with each other, recruit and process members, gain and manage resources, and deal with problems both internal and external (Kilduff). Emphasis is placed on the study of organization structures, principles, techniques and processes as they relate to the management of health services organizations. Opportunities to gain a better understanding of organizational behavior issues such as motivation, leadership, group and team dynamics, emotion and affect, and diversity and inclusion are provided in case analyses and readings. The primary goals of this course are to apply relevant theories to a range of organizational problems and attain skills needed to be an effective leader and researcher in health services organization and management. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-801. Financial Managment. The focus of this course will be to improve the executive's ability to use financial information for strategic decision making. This will be accomplished through a review of the concepts and methods for financial analysis for healthcare organizations. This includes capital investment analysis with an emphasis on valuation, benchmarking, and marginal analysis. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-802. Healthcare Leadership. This class serves as an introduction to leadership course challenging students to explore their understanding of the importance of leadership in health administration. Students will utilize the knowledge and skill they acquire through experience, academic literature, research, and discussion as they participate in class discussions and exercises. In this process students are challenged to expand their current leadership knowledge in an interdisciplinary healthcare environment and develop their critical thinking abilities. Students will also improve their understanding of leadership in its historical context by analyzing the behavior and accomplishments of well-known leaders in history and literature. The capstone of the course will be a leadership self-assessment paper submitted at the end of the course.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-804. Global and Community Health. This course is designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of community and global health concepts and issues.  This course covers demographic measurement, epidemiological methods, outcome assessment, health promotion and disease prevention from a managerial perspective.  Major issues concerning community health status and health risks will be explored.  In addition, the significance of global health issues, and their varying relationships to U. S. national security and public health policies, will be analyzed.  Community health: This course will introduce the student to the concept of using epidemiology as a managerial tool in designing, planning, implementing, and evaluation health care for populations.  Emphasis will be placed on basic epidemiologic principles and methods, and their role in managing health care services for a community or population.  Goals of this course component include: (1) enabling students to understand what is meant by epidemiology, as the basic science for community health and health care management; (2) enabling students to understand that epidemiology provides needed information for disease prevention, treatment of disease, and management of health care services; (3) providing an opportunity for students to apply epidemiologic methods and reasoning to health problems, as well as health care managerial decisions; and (4) increasing the ability of students to comprehend and evaluate health care literature.  Global health: This course will introduce the student to the range of public health, health policy and national security issues in the U. S. that have been created by ongoing developments in global health.  Issues to be covered include the spread of new and emerging infectious diseases, and their impact on global and domestic travel, migration, tourism, trade and economic development; and the growing threat of bioterrorism.  Goals of this course component include: (1) enabling students to understand the inevitable relationships between health administration leadership and the changing global health environment; (2) showing students how global health developments lead to new issues for U. S. health managers and policymakers; (3) providing an opportunity for students to examine current global health issues, including HIV/AIDS and bioterrorism; and (4) increasing the ability of students to apply global health knowledge to their own professions and work environments.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-805. Qualitative Methods. This course provides students in the Doctorate of Health Administration program with an introduction to both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies that are used in health services research. The course enables students to nderstand the key elements of a research proposal and study. The student will begin developing skills in framing a researchable problem, formulating a research question or query, and designing a methodological approach. In addition, the course aims to enhance students' critical thinking skills in evaluating published research studies.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-807. Managing Healthcare Information. This course provides a senior-level view of the issues surrounding the adoption and use of information technology in health care. Students gain insight into national initiatives underway to further the development, expansion, and deployment of health care information systems (including clinical applications such as electronic health records, e-prescribing, provider order entry, disease management) and discuss their ramifications at the state and local levels. Issues surrounding the management of health information resources at the institutional level are also explored including topics such as strategic information systems planning; system selection and implementation; IT governance and management; IT budgeting; management's role in major IT initiatives; assessing and achieving value of health care information systems. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-808. Health Politics & Advocacy. This course is designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of the structure and functioning of the health policy process, particularly at the national level.  Macro and micro-level models of the health policymaking process, and the operation of policy marketplaces, are described in the lectures and readings, along with applications of the models to health policymaking cases.  There is a special focus on examining the current and possible future tradeoffs at the national government level between health services delivery preferences, and growing resource limitations.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-809. Change Management&negotiation. This course focuses on the leadership and management of change in an organizational setting. Specifically, the course seeks to help students understand the dynamic relationship between external demands for change and internal objectives to meet stakeholder demand. The course will focus on organizational development strategies as well as individual negotiation skills to facilitate organizational change in the healthcare setting.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-811. Current Topics in Healthcare. The course will focus on current topics of interest and importance to the delivery and administration of healthcare. Activities will vary, but include critical reading of selected applied health services research publications, discussion of controversial and current issues facing healthcare administration professionals.

 

DHA-812. Evidence Based Decision Making. This course is the rigorous evaluation of the impact of different options that are available for treating a given medical condition for a particular set of patients. Topics include, 1) a review of research designs and statistics methods for comparative effectiveness research, 2) measurement of efficacy, effectiveness, cost and quality of life, 3) benchmarks for economic value, cost effectiveness, cost utility, and budget impact, 4) mathematical approaches for estimating expected outcomes; decision trees and Markov models. Use of current literature will be required as a means to examine examples of good and bad study design.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-814. Study Execution. This is an advanced seminar on principles and techniques for designing and implementing health care and managerial research studies. Students will learn to critically assess the literature and develop a dissertation proposal concept summary based on a topic of interest to them. The course will build on topics and research methods introduced in DHA XXX (Qualitative Methods). 3 S.H.

 

DHA-850. Population Health Management. This course focuses on the development of skills  and knowledge necessary for the DHA to enter into  new and innovative leadership roles in addressing  the health of populations. Population Health  Management (PHM) is a set of strategies and  mechanisms, tailored to the unique  characteristics and needs of populations,  designed to optimize health status, patient  experiences, cost and utilization:  The Triple  Aim. PHM integrates facets of the healthcare  delivery system, including providers, payers and  hospital systems; communities; environment;  patient characteristics, behaviors, and  engagement; and public health systems to meet  outcome objectives.  PHM is a data driven  approach and is organized around the four pillars  of population health: chronic care management,  quality and safety, health policy, and public  health.  The course focuses on using data and  analytics to execute the population health  management process.  Analytics allow students to  understand populations, including health  outcomes, patterns of health drivers and the  policies and interventions that link these two.   Additional course content as it applies to  population health management will include health  systems theory, evidence-based practice  principles, epidemiological concepts, and  enabling informatics concepts.  Students will  have the opportunity to apply the course content  to case studies and will assess and analyze a  population health problem in groups. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-865. Seminar in National Health Policy. This course builds on the knowledge of the general health policymaking process provided in Foundations in Health Policy (DHA-868).  It is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of the structure and functioning of the health policy process, particularly at the national level.  The central didactic component of this class consists of a series of visits to Federal health agencies and health professional organization offices in Washington, DC.  These sessions will include presentations by and discussions with agency and other policy-relevant health professionals. Prerequisites: DHA-868  3 s.h.

 

DHA-867. Quantitative Methods for Research. This course is designed to give students the skills to use data sets and conduct quantitative analysis to address research questions. The course will use actual public-use secondary data sets to provide students experience with data management. The course will also provide presentation of statistical principles and methods most commonly used in health services research. Finally, the course will prepare students in the use of SPSS statistical analysis software. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-872. Leadership III. This class serves as the cumulative leadership course in the DHA program. You will apply the knowledge and skills you have acquired through academic literature, research and lectures as you participate in online and class discussions and exercises. This course will synthesize all the portions of the program and your experiences in your careers leading to potential changes and personal growth.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-874. Interprofessional Studies. This course provides the foundation for health professionals to serve as interprofessional leaders in health professions education and health care delivery.  Through course activities, students will learn concepts and issues in interprofessional education and interprofessional collaborative practice.  These include interprofessional competency frameworks, effective team work principles and models for team performance in health care, research in inteprofessional education and practice, and approaches to interprofessional learning.

 

DHA-876. Evidence-Based Healthcare. This course will provide an introduction to the utilization of best evidence in the practice of healthcare among multiple disciplines.  What is considered evidence by different professions is covered. The course begins with the literature review of EBM, research methods, development of relevant clinical questions and moves to successful search strategies, ending with the application of the evidence to improving quality of care. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-878. Advanced Information Systems. Comprehensive study of the role and impact of IT (Information Technology) in health services organizations.  Specific emphasis on the role IT plays from clinical and managerial perspectives.  Topics include electronic health record, clinical decision support, privacy, patient safety, and security and confidentiality. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-880. DHA Independent Study. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of healthcare administration.  1-3 S.H variable

 

DHA-990. Doctoral Project. Upon completion of the Doctoral Project, credit will be applied to complete the degree requirements. Specific guidelines for the Project and Committee composition are outlined in the DHA Policy Manual.  .5-18 var. s.h.

 

HAP-620. Healthcare Reimbursement Systems. This course integrates information about the various U.S. healthcare payment systems.  It examines the complex financial systems within today's healthcare environment and how payment systems function.  The course gives the student an appreciation for the complexity of reimbursement systems and an understanding of the profund impact they have had on providers, payers, consumers, public policy makers, and the development of classification and information technology over time.  3 s.h.

 

HAP-622. Healthcare Marketing. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the key principles underlying strategic marketing and how these principles are applied in the health care industry.  The course will expose students to marketing fundamentals and demonstrate how an application of these fundamental principles should be applied to the overall strategic plan of a health care organization. 1.5 S.H. Summer and Fall

 

HAP-632. Quality Management of Health Care Servic. This course is intended to provide the student with an understanding of components of a quality management program-quality assessment, risk management, utilization management, and patient safety. JCAHO standards for measuring quality will be introduced. Students will learn and apply principles, processes, and tools used in Quality Improvement. Students will also learn about outcomes assessment and the need for doing risk adjustment. An understanding of the types of data elements and information systems requirements needed for assessing outcomes, quality, and appropriate utilization will also be presented. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-635. The Language of Medicine. The Language of Medicine is a course designed to expose students to the clinical aspects of healthcare.  The course introduces students in Health Administration and Policy to a word-building technique that enables them to substantially understand medical terms used in clinical settings.  The course provided an introduction to disease processes.  Common abbreviations and acronyms used in patient care are also introduced.  It is believed that the knowledge gained from this course will enable students to communicate and interact more effectively with practitioners in healthcare facilities and better understand the meaning of clinical data.  The course is particularly recommended for students with no clinical experience in healthcare. 1 S.H.

 

HAP-702. Health Care Financing. This course will provide students with an understanding of the variety of mechanisms for financing health care in the United States. Of particular interest are the consequences that each mechanism has for the cost and efficiency with which health care is provided. Specific topics include the range and implications of service payment mechanisms, mechanisms for capital acquisition and their effects, organizational structures, markets for firm governance, and for-profit vs. not-for-profit enterprises. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-704. Health Policy. This course is designed to provide students with a conceptual and analytical understanding of health policymaking and politics. Political and policymaking institutions and processes that affect the structure and functioning of the U. S. health care system will be examined. Fundamental concepts and issues associated with political decision making and the delivery of health services will be explored, including the impact of constitutional and other legal provisions, the activities of political parties and interest groups, the involvement of health professional associations and client organizations, and the relationships between economic factors and evolving health policymaking patterns. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-705. Health Economics. This course is designed to provide students with a conceptual and analytical understanding of health economics. Health care systems in the United States will be examined from the perspective of supply, cost and demand determination. Fundamental concepts and issues associated with economic decision-making and selected economic issues will be explored through the application of various socioeconomic concepts and behavioral models. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-719. Health Care Manage & Operation. This course provides the student with an understanding of the major functions of management including planning, organizing, directing and controlling. Students gain an understanding of governance, organizational structures, accreditation/licensure processes, and reimbursement issues in health organizations. 1.5 s.h.

 

HAP-721. Health Care Delivery Systems. This course is a systematic approach to understanding the origin and evolution of the U.S. health care delivery system. Topics include the history of medical care in the U.S., description of the variety of health personnel and facilities that comprise the system, including an investigation of selected contemporary health policy issues, public health, mental health, and alternative systems. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-722. Health Behavior & Epidemiology. An introduction to health behavior and the principles, strategies, and perspectives of epidemiology. Examples are drawn from selected diseases, health relevant behaviors, and health service problems. The course provides a general understanding of health states of populations, prevention efforts and the basic conceptual tools for translating epidemiological findings. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-725. Statistical Analysis in Health Systems. Systematic instruction in research design and selected methods for health services research. Introduction to the use of ANOVA, simple regression, multiple regression, discriminant analysis and path analysis as statistical techniques that might be applied in health administration and health care research. Prerequisite: Completion of at least one undergraduate level statistics course with a grade of 147C148 or better. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-726. Health Care Accounting. This course introduces the student to selected financial accounting topics such as principles of health care accounting, financial statement preparation, governance and internal control, financial statement analysis, capital structure and leverage, working capital management, stock and bond valuations. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-729. Financial Mgmt for Hc Organizations. This course introduces the student to selected strategic finance topics such as cost concepts, costing systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, cost and revenue prediction, pricing strategies, budgeting, variance analysis, inventory management, performance evaluation, and incentive compensation.  Prerequisite: HAP-726. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-730. Healthcare Project Management. This course is designed to provide students with an overview of Operations Management within a healthcare organization. More specifically, it will focus on the many tools available to assess the organization's strategic and tactical position as well as the tools and techniques required to shift an organization from its current state to one closer to the leadership's stated vision. Emphasis will be placed on using project management as the discipline used to deliver on strategic objectives, including a review of the required governance that must be in place to be effective. Students will be expected to demonstrate project management tools and techniques through the implementation of a semester-long project within the community.

 

HAP-735. Health Law & Risk Management. This course introduces the student to legal concepts and issues related to health care management. Special topics include liability, risk management, patient-provider relationships, fraud and abuse, antitrust, and health legislation. This course will also examine selected business law topics including agency and partnership, business corporations, and joint ventures. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-737. Organization Theory and Behavior. This course introduces the major historical and contemporary theories of organization and human behavior in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on the study of organization structures, principles, techniques and processes as they relate to the management of health services organizations. Opportunities to gain a better understanding of organizational behavior issues such as motivation, leadership, decision-making, interpersonal conflict, and group dynamics are provided in case analyses and skill building exercises.  3 s.h.

 

HAP-738. Management and Health Information Systems. This course provides an overview of the variety of information systems used in health care. Concepts related to strategic information systems planning will be introduced. The intent of the course is to give students a broad understanding of the use of technology in health care to manage both clinical and administrative information. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-739. Strategic Mgmt in Healthcare Services. This course includes health care administrative decision making with emphasis on analyzing business problems, formulating policies, and implementing plans for action. Comprehensive cases provide the opportunity to study the proper interrelationships among production/operations, marketing, human resources, and the other functions involved in managing a health care enterprise. Special emphasis is place on the planning function and the principles of health care marketing. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-740. Human Resource Management. This course addresses the traditional personnel functions in health service organizations such as recruitment, selection, job analysis, performance appraisal, compensation/benefits, employee health and safety, grievance, collective bargaining, employee discipline, and discharge. Additionally, current social, behavioral, and legal issues are discussed from a human resource planning and management perspective. The student will not only gain a better understanding of human resource processes, procedures, and issues, but will also acquire skills important to the effective management of people in organization.  3 s.h.

 

HAP-743. Managing Across the Continuum of Care. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the role and functions of the health care manager in a variety of health care settings (examples include physician group practice, long term care, home care). Students have an opportunity to work with individual in these areas and obtain practical experience. Special attention is given to the unique regulations and standards governing the management of these organizations as well as the key issues facing key stakeholders in these settings. Additionally, students are introduced to career opportunities in consulting, the pharmaceutical industry, and entrepreneurial initiatives.  3 s.h.

 

HAP-753. Seminar in Ethical Leadership. This course is intended to help students gain insight into ethical considerations in several settings: individual; organizational; bioethical and in the concept or organizational social responsibility. Students will gain an appreciation for the historical roots of western ethical precepts as the foundation for our current legal and ethical principles. Students apply a model of ethical resolution through cases as well as more recent developments in the public press. The ACHE code of Ethics will specifically be reviewed while other professional codes of ethics will be referenced, highlighting the concept of distinguishing individual, organizational, and professional ethics. In addition, students will be exposed to and discuss several advanced tools of leadership including building alliances, persuasion, negotiation, motivating others, gender bias in the workplace and self-development. These tools will be highlighted and discussed for their leadership value and ethical implications. 1-3 var. s.h.

 

HAP-754. Summer Internship. The Internship is an essential component of the Residential MHA Program.  It is intended to provide MHA students with opportunities to apply theories and techniques learned in the classroom to actual situations, issues or problems within the healthcare community.  It provides a student an opportunity to work with an experienced healthcare manager in a health care facility for a concentrated ten-week period of time.  The scope of the Internship is broad and students should expect to be involved in a wide-range of management-level activities.  Students may expect to be engaged in at least two projects as a component of the Internship experience.  10 S.H. Summer

 

HAP-756. Executive Skills I. This course is the first course of two Executive Skills courses. It is taught seminar style and provides multiple opportunities for students to improve writing and presentation skills as well as engage with professionals from the healthcare community. Guest speakers and special events augment classroom discussion and experiences. The purpose of this class is to help students develop executive skills that will maximize their opportunities for success, and prepare students for presenting themselves in the best possible light. 1 s.h.

 

HAP-757. Executive Skills II. This course is the second course of two Executive Skills courses. It is taught seminar style and provides multiple opportunities for students to improve writing and presentation skills as well as engage with professionals from the healthcare community. In addition, students will be exposed to and digest advanced literature in organizational leadership. The purpose of this class is to help students develop executive skills that will maximize their opportunities for success, and prepare students for presenting themselves in the best possible light. 1 s.h.

 

HCS-300. Intro to Health Behavior/Educ. This course will explore theoretical models and concepts of health behavior and education using a social-ecological framework as well as change management models. The use of models in the development of health education interventions will be covered. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-302. Foundations of Public Health. This course will introduce students to the field of public health, including its history and development. Students will review the major disciplines of public health as well as its key components. Current public health challenges will be examined worldwide, in the US, and in South Carolina. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-304. Social Determinants of Health. This course will examine the fundamental determinants of health, including socioeconomic status, stress, social support, and early life experiences. Students will focus on selected determinants of health and health issues that are relevant to the United States and South Carolina. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-307. Academic and Scientific Writing. This course will strengthen student competencies  in academic and scientific scientific writing as  a process, students will learn to navigate a  diversity of genres, communicate complex  information in plain language, edit for clarity  and tone, and think critically about a document's  audience, message, and purpose. 2 s.h.

 

HCS-308. Ethical Issues in Health Practice and Re. This course will introduce ethical thinking and concepts regarding health practice, health policy, and research. The course will prepare students to understand, evaluate, and participate in ethical decision making. 1 s.h.

 

HCS-310. Program Planning and Implementation. This course will provide the techniques for assessing needs, planning, writing objectives, developing logic models and Gantt charts, and implementing health promotion programs in the clinic, workplace, and community. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-312. Overview of the U.S. Health Care System. This course will provide an overview of the structure and components of the U.S. healthcare system, as well as the different professions. Students will review public and private healthcare insurance plans. 3. s.h.

 

HCS-314. Applied Research and Statistics in the. This course will provide students with an extracting statistical information. Students will assess evidence presented in the health sciences and be able to understand and evaluate evidence for treatment effectiveness and health disparities. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-316. Etiology and Pathophysiology of Chronic. This course provides a broad overview of the most common chronic diseases. Throughout the semester, aspects of disease epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment will be explored. The course will begin with an overview of foundational vocabulary and concepts, as well as a broad analysis of the most common chronic diseases. A framework for the basic disease processes will be established before moving on to discussions of specific organ systems. The course will conclude with a consideration of diseases that impact multiple organ systems. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-318. Evaluation of Health Promotion. This course introduces the topic of program planning and evaluation in public health settings. Each class is intended to provide the foundation for the knowledge needed to understand the basic program planning and evaluation process in a variety of public health settings including state and local health departments, national public health agencies, nonprofit organizations, and international public health settings. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-320. Introduction to Health Policy. The course will provide students with a broad, contextual overview of healthcare policy, policy implications, and factors driving policy outcomes. Through the use of case studies, peer-reviewed articles and current events, this course will provide a framework for understanding how politics influences policy and how social as well as political forces shape healthcare delivery in the United States. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-322. Health and Disease Across the Lifespan. This course will introduce the basic principles that promote health of individuals throughout the lifespan. It will examine the physiological, socioeconomic, cultural, and behavioral factors that impact health, disease, and quality of life across the lifespan. This course will emphasize the role of health promotion and disease prevention across different life stages, and the impact of aging on health and disease; it will discuss major causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-324. Principles of Epidemiology. In this introductory course, students will learn and apply basic concepts of epidemiology to multiple domains of public health. The course covers applications of epidemiologic methods and procedures to the study of the distribution and determinants of health and diseases, morbidity, and mortality in populations. Topics include quantitative aspects of epidemiology, data sources, measures of morbidity and mortality, evaluation of association and causality, and study design. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-330. Practicum Development. This course is a series of self-guided developmental activities resulting in the formulation of a learning contract to be used to complete the senior practicum. Students will build on the previous learning experiences, completion of self-assessments, and identification of personal and career goals to develop senior practicum goals, learning objectives, learning strategies, evidence of learning, and evaluation. 1 s.h.

 

HCS-402. Principles of Health Navigation. This course will provide an overview of the role  and competencies related to patient navigation in  health care delivery. The course will provide you  with an understanding of the role and impact of  accessing and analyzing patient health  information and social determinants that impact  health services delivery, health insurance, and  overall care of the individual. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-404. Delivering Culturally Sensitive Care. This course will introduce students to the  importance of delivering culturally sensitive  education and care to diverse populations. This  course will examine both analytical and practical  approaches to cultural competency in health  promotion and healthcare delivery. Concepts,  models, frameworks, and communication that occur  in cross-cultural health situations will be  discussed, as well as the application of these  concepts in real interventions and programs. 3  s.h.

 

HCS-406. Global Health. This course is designed to provide students with  an overview of factors related to illness,  health, and healing from a comparative  perspective that transcends national borders and  regional interests, and takes cultural difference  and cross-cultural diversity into account. It  will introduce global health using its  contemporary definition, determinants,  development and direction as a field into a broad  global context. Using the language of global  health, it will also discuss health systems  financing and delivery infrastructure for various  countries globally. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-408. Social Marketing. This course is designed to familiarize students  with current theory and knowledge in the field of  social marketing and to analyze the components  and applications of marketing used for promoting  health behavior change strategies. Social  marketing uses audience research to determine  target audience segmentation into groups with  common risk behaviors, motivations, and  information channel preferences. Key audience  segments are then reached with the mix of  intervention strategies formed by the 4 P's of  social marketing, namely product, price, place,  and promotion. The final product is designed  based on the needs and desires of the consumer  and persuasive messages promoting behavior change  are promoted to the target audience. Continuous  evaluation and message revision allows for  continual refinement on the basis of consumer  feedback. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-410. Rural Public Health. Rural residents face distinct health challenges  due to economic conditions, cultural/behavioral  factors, and health provider shortages that  combine to impose striking disparities in health  outcomes among rural populations. This course  will address specific diseases and disorders  faced by rural populations, service delivery  challenges, practitioner shortfalls in rural  areas, and promising community health approaches  and preventive measures. The course also  addresses rural healthcare ethics and  international perspectives. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-412. Leadership in the Health Professions. The purpose of the course is to introduce  principles and theory of leadership and  management in the health professions.  Leadership  and management concepts, principles and practices  will be presented.  Students will be introduced  to strategic planning, grant development and team  building and training. Studies will investigate  their own leadership skill set and determine  strategies they can use to improve these skills.  Students will learn how to incorporate cultural  competence in leadership and management.  Lastly,  students will learn how to address conflict  resolutions and negotiations. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-414. Foundations of Health Informatics. This course will provide the foundation in Health  Informatics. It will provide you with an overview  of basic database architecture, design and file  structure, and data warehousing and data mining  in health care. This course will also encompass  learning about the health information exchanges,  data standards, health informatics ethics, online  resources and E-research. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-480. Guided Practicum. This course provides students an opportunity to  apply learning outside a classroom setting to  gain practical knowledge of a chosen healthcare  profession. Students will identify an area for  exploration, innovation or improvement in a  chosen healthcare profession. This practicum  experience allows students to complete activities  to validate mastery of learning objectives which  the student has designed to fulfill previously  discovered interests and needs. The foundation  for the practicum course is the learning contract  developed in HCS-330. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-700. Database Management. This course focuses on the fundamentals of database design, data organization and utilization. Topics include database types, data warehouses, data marts, integration and interoperability of heterogeneous data sources, data manipulation and processing, application programming interfaces and health care data architectures. Other topics include data types, data standards, information classification, open EHRs, Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR), and analytics applications architectures. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-701. Health Informatics Foundations and Mgmt. This course provides the student with a fundamental understanding of the foundations of health informatics including in terms of its context within the modern health care system and also an understanding of the competencies in relation to health informatics project management. Topics covered include the role of health informatics and analytics in relation to the Affordable Care Act, accountable care organizations, value-based care and population health; meaningful use and other aspects of the health care system. The course will also introduce the student to management concepts and project management specifically within the context of health informatics and health information technology projects. 3 s. h.

 

HIN-702. Intro to Health Care Information Systems. This course provides students with an overview of various clinical and administrative information systems and critical functions used in health care. Key topics include electronic health records, computerized provider order entry, decision support, eprescribing, telemedicine/telehealth, and revenue cycle. Students explore the history, adoption and use of various types of health care information systems and gain insight into the process of selecting and implementation of health IT systems. Reporting requirements and senior level management issues related to the adoption, use and management of health care information systems are also discussed. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-704. Health Care Data-Content, Standards and. This course provides an overview of various types of health care data, different strategies for representing data, information and knowledge including terminologies and ontologies, database concepts (data modeling, relational databases, and structured query language), clinical data warehouses and data mining. Students explore the differences between transactional systems and analytical systems. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-706. Systems Analysis and Design. This course provides the student with a fundamental understanding of the systems life cycle, and key processes involved in the analysis, design, implementation, evaluation and ongoing maintenance and support of health care information systems. Students participate in a hypothetical system selection and implementation process and gain experience in defining system requirements, evaluating vendor products, negotiating contracts and project management. Students also gain experience in mapping clinical workflow and process improvement, and in optimizing the use of health IT to facilitate patient care and improve efficiency. Additionally, students will study different methods for assessing the value of health IT investments. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-708. Applied Statistical and Research Methods. This course provides a working knowledge of approaches to the analysis of archival data for research and quality improvement purposes. Students gain practice in reading, understanding, and presenting statistical materials. Topics include data set and variable descriptions; issues of ascertainment bias associated with retrospective data; criteria for the selection of descriptive statistics; visual presentation of parameters; formulation of hypotheses appropriate for the data; multivariable analysis for continuous dependent variables; log transformation and gamma distribution models; logistic regression; Kaplan Meier curves; controls for selection bias; use of factor and cluster analysis for data reduction. Statistical software package required. Students are also introduced to research methods and how to critically evaluate the literature. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-710. Data Mining and Analytics. With the continued influx of computers into every aspect of the healthcare environment, huge amounts of data are being generated and stored. To translate the vast amount of data into information and knowledge, health care provider organizations need to be able to extract information knowledge and patterns from data to remain competitive in the market and promote advances in health care (e.g. comparative effectives). Students will gain an understanding of the principles of data mining and machine learning and will gain hands-on experience in implementing data mining projects. This course will cover techniques and topics that are widely used in real-world data mining projects including classification, clustering, dimension reduction, feature selection, machine learning algorithms and open-ended knowledge discovery. Class assignments and projects will use real-world data sets and tools to apply the data analytical skills being learned. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-712. Applied Health Informatics. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to engage in solving real world clinical and business informatics issues using a case-based approach. Working in teams, students will apply knowledge of change management principles along with various performance improvement methods (e.g., LEAN, Six Sigma, and Appreciative Inquiry) to address the issues/problems at hand. Students will gain insight into team dynamics and the emerging role of health informatics professionals in solving informatics challenges and in managing change. They will also gain experience in critically evaluating the work of others. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-714. Advanced Health Information Technology. This course provides the students with an in-depth look at concepts in information technology as applied to health care. Topics include electronic medical records, knowledge-based systems, systems integration, nutrition informatics, consumer-facing health technologies, smartphone-based public health information systems, health social media, health sensors, human-computer interfaces, decision theory and decision support, digital libraries, and educational applications. Students will also be exposed to advanced topics in the information technology and health informatics literature. Faculty engaged in health informatics research will also share current research in which they are engaged. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-716. Ethical, Legal, and Regulatory Issues in. This course introduces students to the ethical, legal and regulatory issues relevant to the use of information technology in health care. Key topics include protecting patient confidentiality and securing health information; HIPAA privacy and security regulations; legal medical record; licensure and accreditation standards; health information exchange; preventing and managing breaches; cyber-security; business continuity and disaster planning; managing contracts with business associates. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-718. Capstone Project. Students will complete a practicum in a health care facility or an approved capstone project. The practicum will provide the student with hands on experience in participating in some aspect of a health IT project. Students are expected to enhance their knowledge and skills in areas such as project management, workflow analysis, system evaluation and system optimization, and data analytics. Students are expected to apply and synthesize concepts presented throughout the curriculum. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-780. Thesis Option. Students who are interested in conducting research in health informatics should choose the thesis option. The student will work with a faculty research advisor (and least two other committee members) in developing a research proposal with well-defined problem statement, hypothesis/research question, review of the literature, and methods. Student will present the proposal and conduct independent research study. Thesis requires final defense of research to a Thesis Committee. Thesis will span more than one semester. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-720. Independent Study in Health Services. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of health services as it relates to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-725. Independent Study in Functional Limitati. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of functional limitations as it relates to health and rehabilitation sciences.  1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-730. Independent Study in Pathology & Impairm. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of pathology and impairment as they related to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-735. Special Topics in Health Services. This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore a specialized area of interest in health services related to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-740. Special Topics in Functional Limitation. This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore a specialized area of interest in functional limitations related to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-745. Special Topics in Pathology & Impairment. Students will take part in a research laboratory.  This will allow students to become familiar with research activity in several laboratories at MUSC. These rotations will help students identify the laboratory in which they will perform their Dissertation research.  1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-800. Intro. to Translational Research. Students will critically evaluate the relevant literature to broaden their perspective on translational research and funding opportunities. Invited guest speakers, MUSC faculty, postdoctoral fellows and students will present recently published papers and develop research proposals related to translational research. 3 s.h

 

HRS-801. Applied Research. This course provides students in the Doctorate of Health Administration program and the PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Science with an introduction to qualitative and survey research methodologies that are used in health service/health care research and program evaluation.  The course uses recently published health services research papers teach students the key elements of study designs and data analysis, group discussion to enhance students' critical thinking skills in evaluating published research studies, and the content of the papers to teach current issues in health services research. The course assignments enable each student to begin developing skills in identifying research topics in their area of interest. Assignments include identifying a qualitative or survey research problem, choosing design features, describing study strengths and weaknesses and writing a plan for data collection and analysis. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-802. Comparative Effectiveness Research. The Congressional Budget Office (2007) defined CER as: rigorous evaluation of the impact of different options that are available for treating a given medical condition for a particular set of patients (CBO, 2007 p.3). A recent Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2009) list of CER topics for priority funding identify 4 types of designs: 1) Systematic Review; 2) Decision analysis models; 3) Observational Study; and 4) Large Pragmatic Clinical Trials. This course will introduce students to the concepts and methods of CER and provide an understanding of how CER may contribute to improvements in health care. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-805. Evidence-Based Practice for Research. In HRS 805, students preparing for a research career will gain an understanding of the facilitators and barriers to applying research evidence to clinical and health practice.  Students will be exposed to the article critique and peer review process to allow them to examine the current literature that provides the foundation for evidence-based clinical practices.  Students will learn about research synthesis publications and how to contribute to them in their fields.

 

HRS-810. Health and Rehabilitation Models. In HRS 810, students will explore and critically review models of health and rehabilitation science.  Students will learn how to develop conceptual models and use these models as a foundation for research questions. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-811. Fundamentals of Grant Writing. The main objective of this seminar course is to train students to develop a research idea in their area of interest and transform it into a complete NIH R21 grant application.  The R21 application is unique in that it affords the opportunity to conduct a high risk study as long as it has a corresponding high reward potential.  The course will be administered by the primary instructor but will take advantage of the unique knowledge base and skill sets of a few invited guest speakers (MUSC faculty and/or postdoctoral fellows). 3 s.h.

 

HRS-812. Seminar on Health Services Research. A health services research (HSR) covering the evolution of HSR over the last 40 years.  Students will review the original studies that effected the major paradigm shifts that HSR has undergone since the 1970s.  Students will discuss classical health services models and design approaches and critically analyze contemporary HSR studies, in view of the models, designs and methods used in the classical studies. 1 s.h.

 

HRS-814. Basic Academic Teaching Skills. This course provides an overview of the principles of adult learning; instructional design, instructional methods, skills, media, and evaluation; and instructional technology for use in health and rehabilitation sciences.  Emphasis will be on the design, delivery, and evaluation of selected units of instruction.  Under guided conditions, graduate students will hone teaching skills for use in a wide variety of contexts. 2 s.h.

 

HRS-815. Hlth & Rehab Sci Lab Rotation. Through rotations through applied laboratories, students will be expoosed to diverse research arenas, scientific approaches, technologies and experiences. 1-6 var. s.h

 

HRS-819. Teaching Practicum in Hlth & Rehab Sci. Under faculty supervision, students will engage in teaching-learning contexts that allow for the application of instructional design, delivery, and evaluation principles, and further hone their teaching skills to meet the needs of a variety of learners: students, peers, patients, and community members. Prerequisite: HRS-814  1-4 s.h. (variable)

 

HRS-820. Statistical Methods for Rehabilitation. This course provides a working knowledge of approaches to the analysis of archival data in rehabilitation research. The course is intended for PhD students in the College of Health Professions, but would also be of interest to graduate students in other professional programs. Topics include 1) data set and variable description; 2) issues of ascertainment bias associated with retrospective data; 3) criteria for the selection of descriptive statistics; 4) visual presentation of parameters; 4) formulation of hypotheses appropriate for the data; 5) multivariable analysis for continuous dependent variables; 6) log transformation; 7) logistic regression; 8) Kaplan Meier curves; 9) controls for selection bias; 10) use of factor and cluster analysis for data reduction; 11) interpretation of outputs from SAS and SPSS statistical software; 12) presentation and discussion of results. Students will use SAS or SPSS software to perform analyses of observational data to answer rehabilitation questions and interpret results in terms of both clinical and statistical conclusions. Minimum pre-requisites include basic statistics preparation and a minimum of 6 hours completed in the doctoral curriculum, or permission of the instructor. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-825. Human Anatomy for Doctoral Students. Human Anatomy provides students with a detailed examination of all structural aspects of all regions of the human body.  Doctoral students will have opportunity for special emphasis on regions and systems that relate to their researach interests through papers or projects as agreed upon between student, content advisor and Dr. Thomas. 6 s.h.

 

HRS-830. Introduction to Biostatistics. This course is designed to give students the skills to use data sets and conduct quantitative analysis to address research questions.  The course will use actual public-use secondary data sets, as well as small experimental rehabilitation data to provide students experience with data management and applied statistical analysis of real data.  The course will also provide presentation of introductory level statistical principles and methods most commonly used in research. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-830L. Introduction to Biostatistics Lab. The course will prepare students in the use of SAS and/or SPSS statistical analysis software.  This course is designed to give students the skills to use data sets and conduct quantitative analysis to address research questions.  The course will use actual public-sue secondary data sets, as well as small experimental rehabilitation data to provide students experience with data management and applied statistical analysis of real data. 2 s.h.

 

HRS-990. Dissertation Course. Dissertation work includes original investigation that gives evidence of mature scholarship and critical judgment, indicates knowledge of research methods and techniques, and demonstrates the ability to carry out independent investigation. Preparation of the dissertation may comply with the regulations contained in A Guide to the Preparation of Theses and Dissertations, which is available in the Graduate Office or through the College of Graduate Studies website. 1-12 s.h.

 

OT-510. Professional Issues in OT. This course increases awareness of professional issues within the field of occupational therapy. Topics such as professional accountability, professional liability, and continuing competence are examined. Students develop skills to enhance lifelong learning, and advocate for their own professional development, the development of the profession, and for those who are unable to meet their own occupational needs in society. 2 S.H. lecture.  Mitcham  Required Pre-requisites: All previous course work from Semesters 1-4

 

OT-520. Clin Correlate (Psychosocial Pract). This course provides guided observation and participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process. The format includes discussion and participation in clinical fieldwork experience. Students observe and participate in occupational therapy evaluation and intervention of individuals with psychiatric disorders, developmental delay, and mental retardation, and apply concepts from various psychosocial frames of reference. 1 S.H. Carson Required Pre-requisites: OT 604, OT 604L 

 

OT-522. OT Clinical Correlate ( Pediatrics). This course provides guided observation and selected participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process during a full-time, one-week Level I fieldwork experience with emphasis in pediatrics. Students observe and participate in evaluation and treatment of pediatric clients with a variety of diagnoses and conditions that are served in medical or educational settings and apply concepts from previous and concurrent courses emphasizing pediatric diagnoses, intervention and occupational performance. 1 S.H. Burik  Required Pre-requisites: OT 601, OT 601L, OT 659

 

OT-530L. OT for Neuro Cond I Lab. This course provides active involvement with clients with acute and chronic disabling conditions of neurological origin. Students will practice neurorehabilitation evaluations and apply these skills to the evaluation of clients with neurological movement impairment. Students learn other neurorehabilitation skills such as wheelchair mobility, transfers, and facilitation of movement skills for occupational performance. Students perform a synthesis of motor rehabilitation literature and apply research-based evidence to the clinical reasoning process, specifically with regards to choosing and formulating intervention for these clients. Through hands-on involvement with clients and dynamic interactive discussions/debates, students experience first-hand the application of conceptual motor rehabilitation frameworks to the occupational therapy process. 1 S.H. lab.  Faculty Required Pre-requisites: RS 701, OT 646, OT 646L

 

OT-530. OT for Neuro Cond I. This course promotes entry-level occupational therapy skills in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with movement dysfunction resulting from acquired neurological disorders. Specific emphasis is placed upon the relationship between occupational performance dysfunction and motor performance skill deficits. Students integrate motor control and motor learning conceptual practice models with occupational performance frameworks as a basis for evaluation and treatment planning. Through in-depth and extensive exploration of motor control mechanisms and theories of activity-dependent plasticity, students develop an understanding of the role of an occupational therapist in motor rehabilitation. 2 S.H. lecture.  Faculty  Required Pre-requisites: RS 701, OT 646, OT 646L

 

OT-545L. Surface Anatomy Lab. This lab course provides students with the knowledge of clinical surface anatomy necessary to practice in the field of occupational therapy.  Students will review and palpate bony landmarks, soft tissue structures, and muscles in the upper and lower extremity, head, neck, back, thorax, and abdomen. 1 s.h.

 

OT-561. Res/Scholarship Exp in Occ Ther I. This course is a continuation of Research/Scholarship Experience in occupational Therapy I.   It provides an opportunity for students to work in small groups under the direction of the faculty member and engage in research or scholarship activities related to occupational therapy. 1 s.h.

 

OT-562. Res/Scholarship Exp in Occup Therapy II. This course is a continuation of the Research/Scholarship Experience in Occupational Therapy I.  It provides an opportunity for students to work in small groups under the direction of a faculty member and engage in research or scholarship activities related to occupational therapy. 2 s.h.

 

OT-601. Occupational Performance in Pediatrics I. This course examines the major sensorimotor, cognitive, neuromotor, and psychosocial theories of normal development from childhood to early adulthood from an occupational therapy perspective.  The etiology and clinical features of common infant and childhood diseases / disorders are discussed with emphasis on neurological and biomechanical conditions. Students are introduced to common occupational therapy assessments and treatment approaches used to evaluate the development of infants and children in the following areas: visual perceptual, fine motor, self-help, oral motor / feeding, and neuromotor.  Clinical decision making and treatment in a variety of therapeutic settings will be discussed. 3 S.H. lecture. Coker Required Pre-requisites: RS 716, OT 545

 

OT-601L. Occupational Performance in PEDS I Lab. Small group sessions are used to apply principles and ideas presented in Occupational Performance in Pediatrics I lecture.  Emphasis is placed on participating in completing occupational therapy pediatric assessments, developing treatment activities, goal setting, and documentation for the infants and children with neuromuscular conditions. 1 S.H. lab. Coker Required Pre-requisites: RS 716, OT 545

 

OT-602. Occupational Performance in Peds II. This course is a continuation of material from Occupational Performance in Pediatrics I. Emphasis is placed on the etiology and clinical features of common infant and childhood diseases / disorders with emphasis on cognitive and sensory processing disorders. Students are introduced to common occupational therapy assessments and treatment approaches used to evaluate infants and children with cognitive delays and sensory processing deficits in the following areas: visual perceptual, fine motor, self-help, oral motor, and sensory processing.  Clinical decision making, treatment, and documentation in a variety of therapeutic settings are discussed. 3 S.H. lecture. Coker Required Pre-requisites: OT 601, OT 601L 

 

OT-602L. Occupational Performance in Peds II Lab. Small group sessions are used to apply principles and ideas presented in Occupational Performance in Pediatrics II lecture. Emphasis is placed on completing occupational therapy pediatric assessments, developing treatment activities, goal setting, and documentation for the infants and children with cognitive or sensory processing disorders. 2 S.H. lab. Coker Required Pre-requisites: OT 601, OT 601L

 

OT-603. Occupational Performance in Geriatrics. This course examines foundational, clinical, and behavioral sciences pertinent to the application of the occupational therapy processes of evaluation, intervention and outcomes for older adults. Students gain knowledge of the multiple issues surrounding occupational therapy practice with older adults including age-related changes, common diagnoses and conditions, ethical and legal issues impacting service delivery, and the influence of contextual factors on occupational performance. 2 S.H. lecture. Burik Required Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

 

OT-604. OT Performance/Psychosocial Practice I. This course provides an introduction to psychosocial occupational therapy.  Concepts of therapeutic use of self, interviewing techniques, communication skills, and group process dynamics, theory, and skills are examined and applied to psychosocial occupational therapy treatment. Psychosocial frames of reference and evaluation methods are introduced. 1 S.H. lecture. Carson Required Pre-requisites: OT 613

 

OT-604L. Ot Perform/Psychosocial Practice Lab I. . This course provides participation in lab activities designed to facilitate an understanding of therapeutic use of self, interviewing techniques, communication skills, and group process dynamics / skills with emphasis on the clinical relevance to psychosocial occupational therapy treatment. 1 S.H. lab. Carson Required Pre-requisites: OT 613

 

OT-606. Occup Perf: Neuro II. This course is the second of two courses designed to promote entry-level occupational therapy skills in the evaluation and treatment of clients with neurological conditions. Theories and principles or evaluation, treatment, and adaptation will be presented with specific emphasis on the relationship between occupational performance and cognitive frameworks as they relate to occupational therapy practice. 1 S.H. Required prerequisites: OT 530, OT 530L

 

OT-606L. Occup Perf: Neuro II Lab. This course promotes knowledge and acquisition of skills and attitudes necessary for the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework process of evaluation, intervention, and outcome as it relates to neurological conditions, specifically for clients who have survived a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and present with cognitive and/or perceptual dysfunction. 1 S.H. lab. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 530, OT 530L

 

OT-608. Occ Perf. Neuro Cond. III. This course is the third of three courses designed to promote entry-level occupational therapy skills in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with cognitive and perceptual dysfunction resulting from acquired neurological conditions.  Theories and principles of evaluation, treatment, and adaptation will be presented with specific emphasis on the relationship between occupational performance and cognitive frameworks as they relate to occupational therapy practice.  3 s.h.  Pre-requisites: OT 606, OT 606L

 

OT-608L. Occ. Perf. Neuro. Cond. III LAB. This course is the correlate lab to the lab to the Occupational Performance in Neurological Conditions III Lecture course.  The lab is designed to promote knowledge and acquisition of skills and attitudes necessary for the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework process of evaluation, intervention, and outcome as it relates to cognitive-perceptual dysfunction, specifically for clients who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI).  1 s.h. LAB Required Pre-requisites: OT 606, OT 606L

 

OT-612. Intro to Occup Science & Occup Therapy. This course provides an introduction to occupational science, the study of humans as occupational beings.  Further, the role of occupation as the philosophical underpinning of the profession of occupational therapy is explored, along with its history, development, and key organizations.  The course will also provide an overview of the theoretical foundations upon which the practice of contemporary occupational therapy is built.  Current status of and challenges for the profession are discussed across a variety of contexts - medical, educational and community.  Students begin to engage in the process of envisioning and developing their career trajectory.  2 S.H. lecture.  Required Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

 

OT-619. Pathophysiology. The purpose of this course is to acquaint rehabilitation science students with pathological changes in human function that lead to and are associated with various diseases. Understanding diseases and pathologically altered function forms an important component to evaluation, treatment, and the rehabilitation process. 3 S.H. lecture. Thomas  Required

 

OT-622. Synthesis and App. of Clin. Skills. This course fosters greater development of clinical reasoning through engagement in complex case studies, simulated experiences, and guided reflection. Students are encouraged to take a holistic approach in organizing, reviewing, and conceptualizing prior clinical coursework and to ultimately apply knowledge in multifaceted clinical scenarios. Requirements include successful completion of the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) Occupational Therapy Knowledge Exam (OTKE) and the comprehensive Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the transition from thinking like a student to thinking like a therapist in preparation for Level II fieldwork. 1 s.h.

 

OT-625. OT Clinical Correlate Physical Dysfunct. This course provides guided observation and participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process.  The format includes discussion and participation in a full-time, one-week Level I clinical fieldwork experience with emphasis in physical dysfunction. Students observe and participate in the evaluation and intervention of clients with a variety of diagnoses and conditions that are served in medical and/or community-based settings while applying concepts from the biomechanical, neurodevelopmental, and rehabilitative frames of reference. 1 S.H. Burik Required Pre-requisites: OT 606, OT 606L 

 

OT-627. Clinical Anatomy of the Upper Limb. The course will allow you to study and learn the anatomy of the upper limb, using videotaped presentations, computer applications, group meetings, and clinical applications.  Each student enrolled is assumed to be an independent learner who is motivated strictly by his/her own interest in anatomy.  Consequently, in order for the offering to be successful, all students will have to complete all assignments in an attentive fashion, as well as be present for group meetings. It is expected that everyone will participate to the fullest and give a significant contribution to his/her group activities. 1 S.H. lecture.  Bowman & Thomas Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

 

OT-636. Advanced Treatment Techniques. . Presents an opportunity for students to study new and/or specialized treatment techniques in a particular area of practice.  Practical experiences in using the selected treatment techniques are included. 1-3 S.H. Faculty 

 

OT-637. Special Topics in OT     . This course allows students to expand knowledge and skills in an area of special interest. 1-3 S.H. Faculty

 

OT-638. Occ Performance Psychosocial Pract II. This course explores methods of evaluation, program planning, and treatment implementation for psychosocial occupational therapy. A discussion of psychosocial issues of clients and caregivers as a vital aspect of health care is included. 2 S.H. lecture. Carson Required Pre-requisites: OT 604, OT 604L

 

OT-639. Delivery & Management of OT. The evolution of an increasingly complex health care environment makes it essential for occupational therapy students to understand contemporary service delivery and management practices.  This course provides an overview of healthcare systems, educational systems, and community systems in which occupational therapists practice. This course introduces students to current concepts and principles of management including reimbursement issues, laws pertinent to employment, and human resource issues.  Principles of program development and components of effective grant writing are explored and applied. 3 S.H. lecture. Carson Required Pre-requisites: All previous course work from Semesters 1-4

 

OT-640. Clinical Practicum I. This course is the first in a series of three Level II, full-time fieldwork experiences intended to emphasize the application of an academically acquired body of knowledge by providing the student with an in-depth experience in performance of the occupational therapy process.  Under supervision, the student will evaluate and treat clients across the life span reflecting diversity of diagnosis and culture. 12 S.H. Burik  Required Pre-requisites: Completion of all didactic coursework and Level 1 fieldwork

 

OT-641. Clinical Practicum II. This course is the second in a series of three Level II, full-time fieldwork experiences intended to emphasize the application of an academically acquired body of knowledge by providing the student with an in-depth experience in performance of the occupational therapy process.  Under supervision, the student will evaluate and treat clients across the life span reflecting diversity of diagnosis and culture. 12 S.H. Burik  Required Pre-requisites: OT 640

 

OT-644. Occ Perform Musculoskeletal Cond I. This course provides students with a solid foundation in the evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders using the biomechanical and rehabilitative frames of reference.  Included in this first segment are: 1) principles of evaluation, including interviewing skills, muscle testing, goniometry, dexterity and endurance 2) concepts and techniques related to physical intervention 3) application of activity analysis to functional daily living tasks 4) basic skills for transfers and adaptive equipment.  The science of biomechanics and kinesiology is presented in relation to acute and chronic orthopedic disorders along with case presentations to integrate clinical decision-making and problem solving. 4 S.H. lecture. Bowman Required Pre-requisites: RS 716, OT 545

 

OT-644L. Occ Perform Musculoskel Cond I Lab. This course provides the student with a solid foundation in the evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders to ensure the development of practical occupational therapy evaluation skills. Students study and practice assessment tests and measurement skills including occupational profile, initial interviewing skills, manual muscle testing, measurement of joint range of motion, vital sign assessments, dexterity, sensation testing, and neurological screening. Concepts and techniques related to therapeutic intervention and posture analysis are practiced and related to various common situations involving musculoskeletal dysfunction to provide problem-solving skills during laboratory sessions. 2 S.H. lab. Bowman Required Pre-requisites: RS 716, OT 545

 

OT-646. Occupational Perform/Musculoskel Con II. This course provides students with a solid foundation in evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. Included in this course are the continued exploration of evaluation and treatment of orthopedic disorders and the progression into more complicated conditions and advanced treatment techniques. Principles of occupational task adaptation, upper extremity evaluation and treatment, industrial rehabilitation, treatment modalities, and orthotic fabrication are presented. Student case presentations are used to build upon the skills acquired in the previous musculoskeletal course. Clinical problems are used to ensure the student is able to develop a treatment plan and home program for any given case. 4 S.H. lecture. Bowman Required Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

 

OT-646L. Occupational Perform for Musc Con II Lab. This course provides students with evaluation and treatment skills for musculoskeletal disorders. Included in this second segment are the continued exploration of evaluation and treatment methodology for orthopedic disorders, principles and application of modality use, occupational tasks, upper extremity evaluation and treatment, industrial rehabilitation, and adaptation, orthotic fabrication of static and dynamic splints and case study presentations to integrate advance occupational therapy evaluation and treatment skills. All activities are demonstrated and practiced to build on the practical skills during the first segment of the course. 2 S.H. lab. Bowman Required Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

 

OT-659. OT Clinical Correlate (Occupation). This course introduces students to the role of fieldwork in occupational therapy education and practice and provides students with opportunities to participate in non-traditional, community-based Level I fieldwork experiences. The course provides students with a foundation for acquiring and developing a repertoire of beginning professional behaviors while engaging in service learning with individuals and organizations in the community. 1 S.H.  Burik Required Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

 

OT-661. OT Clinical Correlate (geriatrics). This course provides guided observation and participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process during non-traditional, community-based Level I fieldwork experiences that emphasize wellness, enhancing quality of life, and engagement in occupation to support participation in context for older adults. Students interview and assess clients, participate in activity programming, plan and implement therapeutic groups based on clients146 needs and interests, and document the occupational therapy process while applying concepts from previous and concurrent coursework. 1 S.H. Burik Required Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L, OT 659 

 

OT-664. Instructional Processes. Opportunity for individuals and/or small group of students to actively participate with faculty members in innovative community-based experiences that will improve the health needs of diverse communities. Students will gain experience examining how their professional skills may be harnessed to respond to the health objectives embedded in Healthy People 2010. 3 s.h. Faculty.

 

OT-667. Evidenced Based Practice I.  This course introduces students to the concepts of evidence-based practice. Students will specifically learn the concepts of quantitative research by giving attention to basic principles underlying the process of clinical science, including concepts of the scientific methods related to experimental research. Three major aspects of the scientific method addressed will be: 1) reliability and validity, 2) research design and 3) data analysis. Students will be oriented to published rehabilitation literature and will learn how to search, read, and analyze literature that validates current occupational therapy practice. 2 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

 

OT-668. Evidence Based Practice II. This course introduces and provides preliminary experience with qualitative research approaches used to generate new knowledge in the rehabilitation sciences. Attention will be given to exploring the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative research methods, the principles of methodologic rigor, strategies for qualitative analysis, the importance of ethical research conduct, and to examining and critiquing existing professional evidence that may be used to inform practice. 1 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 667

 

OT-681. Independent Study in Occupational Therapy. Students study a topic related to OT under faculty supervision. 1-3 var. s.h. Faculty

 

OT-695. Community Based Practice. Opportunity for individuals and/or small group of students to actively participate with faculty members in innovative community-based experiences that will improve the health needs of diverse communities. Students will gain experience examining how their professional skills may be harnessed to respond to the health objectives embedded in Healthy People 2010. 1-3 s.h. Faculty.

 

OT-698. Professional Capstone Seminar. This course provides an intensive two-day seminar immediately following the completion of all three clinical practicums.  The seminar focuses on review of requisite skills for taking the national certification examination and readiness for entry into the practice environment. Attention is given to establishing a career trajectory, developing plans for continuing competence and ongoing professional contribution, and creating an effective balance between one146s personal and professional lives. 1 S.H. lecture. Faculty Required Pre-requisites: OT 642

 

OT-701. Neuroscience. This course will thoroughly examine the structure and function of the human nervous system with emphasis on functional considerations related to clinical practice.  It will include a study of microscopic and macroscopic anatomical components of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous system with emphasis on the organization of functional systems.  The neurophysiological principles which are related to neural transmission and function of the various pathological conditions affecting nervous system will be emphasized and students will be expected to correlate the clinical manifestations with the anatomic location of the pathology.  4 s.h.

 

OT-716. Human Anatomy. This course in gross anatomy provides students with the knowledge of clinical anatomy necessary to practice their expertise upon graduation. The contents of the course include gross anatomy and an introduction to anatomical radiology, and will be conducted to represent a survey of the entire human body.  Teaching/learning methodologies will include lectures and discussions, prosected human cadavers, and computer applications. The course will be taught regionally (i.e. upper limb, lower limb, spine, etc.), and will survey all morphologic systems.  4 S.H. lecture, 1 S.H. lab. Thomas  Required Pre-requisites: Admission to the program 

 

OT-800. Intro to Occupational Therapy. This course introduces students to the theoretical underpinnings of occupational therapy via an exploration of occupational science, the study of humans as occupational beings, and the occupational therapy conceptual practice models. The role of occupation as the philosophical foundation and central core of the profession is explored, along with its history, ethics, domain, process and key organizations. The current status of, and challenges for, the profession are discussed across a variety of contexts (medical, educational, and community), and for a variety of recipients (individuals, organizations, and populations). The overall goals of the course are to (1) encourage students to develop an occupational perspective and lens through which to view the world; (2) foster students' ability to situate themselves and their learning within the field as a whole; (3) engage students in the process of envisioning and developing their career trajectory; and (4) offer resources to support students' wellness along the academic journey.  3 s.h.

 

OT-802. Therapeutic Interactions. Concepts of therapeutic use of self are defined and discussed  including self-awareness of attributes and skills for effective  interpersonal interaction with clients and caregivers. Effective collaboration between the occupational therapist and occupational  therapist assistant and members of the health care team is  discussed. Principles of interviewing techniques and group  process  dynamics, theory, and skills are presented and discussed in the  context of occupational therapy practice.  1 s.h.

 

OTD-803. Therapeutic Interactions Lab. Concepts of therapeutic use of self are applied for effective interpersonal interaction with clients and caregivers. An opportunity to practice effective interviewing skills, interpersonal communication, OT/OTA collaboration, and effective group leadership and facilitation is provided both in the classroom and community setting.  1 s.h.

OTD-806. Human Anatomy. This course in gross anatomy provides students with the knowledge of clinical anatomy necessary to practice their expertise upon graduation. The contents of the course include gross anatomy and an introduction to anatomical radiology, and will be conducted to represent a survey of the entire human body.  Teaching/learning methodologies will include lectures and discussions, prosected human cadavers, and computer applications. The course will be taught regionally (i.e. upper limb, lower limb, spine, etc.), and will survey all morphologic systems. 5 s.h.

OTD-807. Surface Anatomy Lab. This course provides students with the knowledge of clinical surface anatomy necessary to practice in the field of occupational therapy. Students will review and palpate bony landmarks, soft tissue structures, and muscles in the upper and lower extremity, head, neck, back, thorax, and abdomen. Students are challenged to apply new knowledge by simulating the role of therapist during lab and practical exams. Students are also expected to demonstrate professional attitudes and use lay terminology during simulations in order to prepare for real patient interaction.  1 s.h.

 

PA-606. Human Anatomy. Human Anatomy is a broad, survey course that provides students with a detailed examination of all structural aspects of the human body. The course is presented by regions and allows students to learn and assimilate the morphology of different areas of the human body in an organized and logical fashion. Students are expected to become skilled at identification of anatomical structures, and are also expected to become proficient at recognition of structural arrangements and structural relationships. Anatomical structures are correlated with radiographic images in each of the regions studied. The course content is designed to correlate with important clinical problems that students may encounter as practitioners, and students are encouraged to start acquainting themselves with ways that anatomical alterations can affect normal function. The course is taught via lectures, class discussions, and laboratory dissection/prosection of human cadavers. Students have the opportunity to further their knowledge of anatomy by using computer-assisted technology, which is available online. Prerequisite: Enrollment into the Physician Assistant Program. 6 s.h.Summer.

 

PA-607. Intro to the PA Profession. This seminar course is designed specifically for the PA student covering the following topic areas: the healthcare delivery system and the PA role and legal standing in US health care, federal programs and initiatives in health care delivery, payment mechanisms and reimbursement policies, federal health care policy as well as risk management and quality assurance. Collaboration with other health care providers in the team approach to patient care will be emphasized. A critical review of selected readings will be required for classroom discussions. Prerequisite:  Enrollment into the Physician Assistant Program. 1 s.h. Summer

 

PA-614. Fundamentals of Clin Med I. The Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine (FCM) course series introduces the study of the disease process. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the essential anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medical terminology relevant to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. The differential diagnosis of symptoms and physical findings along with interpretation of laboratory and radiographic tests appropriate to each system are discussed. Topics include dermatology, EENT, endocrinology, hematology and cardiology. 6 s.h.

 

PA-615. Fundamentals of Clin Med II. This course continues the introduction to the study of the disease process. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the essential anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medical terminology relevant to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. The differential diagnosis of symptoms and physical findings along with interpretation of laboratory and radiographic tests appropriate to each system is discussed. Topics include respiratory, musculoskeletal, genitourinary, renal, women's health and gastrointestinal diseases. 6 s.h.

 

PA-616. Fundamentals of Clin Med III. This course continues the introduction to the study of the disease process. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the essential anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medical terminology relevant to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. The differential diagnosis of symptoms and physical findings along with interpretation of laboratory and radiographic tests appropriate to each system is discussed. Topics include neurology, psychiatry and infectious disease. 3 s.h.

 

PA-617. Clinical Problem Solving I. Clinical Problem Solving will consolidate the topics of medicine by developing a logical methodology of assessment of disease processes or syndromes, and subsequent intervention. Students will master the ability to generate differential diagnoses specific to the patients' presenting complaints, signs and symptoms and laboratory data.  A problem-based learning format is used. Prerequisites:  Human Anatomy, Clinical Laboratory Medicine.  1 s.h. Fall.

 

PA-618. Clinical Problem Solving II. Clinical Problem Solving II is a continuation of Clinical Problem Solving I. Prerequisites: Clinical Problem Solving I, Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine I, Physical Diagnosis. 1 s.h. Spring.

 

PA-619. Clinical Problem Solving III. Clinical Problem Solving III is a continuation of Clinical Problem Solving II. Prerequisites: Clinical Problem Solving II, Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine II. 1 s.h. Summer.

 

PA-624. Pharmacotherapeutics I. This course teaches the fundamental principles of pharmacotherapy by presenting the rational for treatments as well as the recommended treatment plans for a specific category of disease processes, symptoms and conditions in sequence with body system topics of PA614 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine I.  Students learn to individualize medication regimens based on drug attributes, clinical evidence, comorbidities, drug mechanism of action, drug safety, monitoring parameters and treatment cost.  Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. Prerequisite: Principles of Pharmacology 3 s.h. Fall

 

PA-625. Pharmacotherapeutics II. This course is a continuation of PA 624 and teaches pharmacotherapy by presenting the rational for treatments as well as the recommended treatment plans for a specific range of disease processes, symptoms and conditions in sequence with body system topics within PA 615 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine II.  Students will continue to learn how to individualize medication regimens based on drug attributes, clinical evidence, comorbidities, drug mechanism of action, drug safety, monitoring parameters and treatment cost. Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. Prerequisite: Pharmacotherapeutics I 3 s.h. Spring.

 

PA-626. Pharmacotherapeutics III. This course is a continuation of PA 625 and teaches pharmacotherapy by presenting the rational for treatments as well as the recommended treatment plans for a specific range of disease processes, symptoms and conditions in sequence with body system topics within PA 616 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine III.  Students will continue to learn how to individualize medication regimens based on drug attributes, clinical evidence, comorbidities, drug mechanism of action, drug safety, monitoring parameters and treatment cost. Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. Prerequisite: Pharmacotherapeutics II  2 s.h. Summer.

 

PA-630. Bioethics. This course introduces key concepts related to  medical law, ethics and bioethics and uses a case  based approach to explore the central moral,  philosophical, and social problems in health  care. Students reflect on the relationships among  moral, professional and legal obligations of  physician assistants, including those involving  honesty, and respect for patient well-being,  autonomy, dignity and confidentiality. 1 s.h.

 

PA-632. Principles of Pharmacology. This course introduces the pharmacologic principles and concepts which are paramount to making sound pharmacotherapeutic decisions. The course explores how medications are delivered to the body, how they are eliminated from the body and how they work in the body. Key concepts include mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug targets, pharmaceutical math, drug toxicity and drug interactions. Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. There will also be a review of microbiology to refamiliarize students with common, clinically relevant organisms that cause disease as well as an introduction to antibiotics. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Physician Assistant Program 2 s.h. Summer.

 

PA-633. International Physician Assistant. This course is designed to expose the student to  PA practice in other nations, with a focus on  investigating the similarities and differences  between practice in the United States and other  nations. Students will interact with PA students  from the host program(s), participate in PA  education in the host system, and explore aspects of the health care system in the country  selected for study. 1 s.h.

 

PA-634. History & Physical Examination Skills. This course focuses on the clinical knowledge and skills necessary for the physician assistant in primary care practice to perform a thorough assessment of a patient using a body-system approach. Students will rely on knowledge of anatomy and physiology in clinical and simulated patient experiences with emphasis on therapeutic communication, medical history, and physical examination. 2 s.h.

 

PA-636. Clinical Skills and Procedures. This course builds clinical skills needed to negotiate the clinical year successfully. Skills to be learned this semester will be multiple and include: surgical knot-tying, suturing, orthopedic splinting, passage of NG tubes, cerumen and foreign body removal from ear and nose, operating room procedures, lumbar puncture, arthrocentesis, diagnostic ultrasound, I & D of abscesses, treatment of ingrown toenails, subungual hematoma evacuation, cryosurgery, IV line placement, local and topical anesthesia techniques, peripheral nerve blocks, removal of corneal and conjunctival foreign body, tonometry, nasal packing, ABG collection, bladder catheterization, pulmonary function testing, treatment of Bartholin's cyst/abscess, pap smear screening, inguinal hernia reduction, STD screening, treatment of nursemaid's elbow, IM, SQ and intradermal injections and pre-school children oral health assessment and fluoride varnish application. You will do physical exams on hospitalized patients with internal medicine resident supervision and critique/instruction. You will all participate in an OR experience. Prerequisite: History and Physical Examination Skills.  2 s.h.

 

PA-641. Student Personal Wellness. This elective course is open to physician assistant students with an interest in personal wellness and developing a better work-life balance.  Students enrolled in this course will learn the PATIENCE (Physician Assistant (student) Training (for) Introspection, rElaxation, aNd Career Endurance) Curriculum, which was developed for this course. The Elective will be mainly web-based, with occasional in-person meetings.  It will incorporate principles of work-life balance such as introspection and relaxation to help promote career longevity and avoidance of early burnout.   Assignments will include a choice of reading assignments, personal/self-reflections, journaling, and activities such as meditation to promote an improved sense of personal wellness and work-life balance.  A majority of the assignments will be submitted via online modalities.  Furthermore, attention on reducing work stress, encouraging personal health, improving sleep hygiene, and decreasing dependence on electronics will be incorporated.  This elective will provide a unique experience that students would not ordinarily be exposed to in other classes within the physician assistant student curriculum.  Prerequisite: Admission into the PA program.  1 s.h.

 

PA-643. Human Physio & Basic Pathophysio Concept. This course provides an in depth discussion of normal human physiology which builds upon prerequisite coursework. Course topics, where applicable, will be integrated with PA 606 - Human Anatomy. In addition,the following basic pathophysiologic concepts will be discussed in preparation for the subsequent integrated medicine and pathophysiology curricula. 3 s.h. Summer.

 

PA-646. Pediatrics. This course provides students with a fundamental knowledge base regarding General Pediatrics.  The student will be able to later apply this knowledge clinically in the evaluation and treatment of newborns, infants, children, and adolescents. Prerequisites:  Progression to the second summer didactic semester 1 S.H.

 

PA-651. Geriatrics. This course provides the student with a broad overview of challenges unique to caring for our aging population. The purpose of the course is to facilitate students' ability to perform quality geriatric patient care and to foster collaboration of the students with other professionals working in geriatrics by fieldwork at interdisciplinary geriatric settings.  Co-requisites:  Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine III. 1 s.h. Summer.

 

PA-652. Principles of Emergency Medicine. The course introduces the fundamental principles  of emergency medicine practice. Initial,  life-saving and stabilizing interventions for the  critically ill and seriously injured as well as  common presenting conditions to the emergency  department are presented. Students will also be  certified in Basic and Advanced Life Support. 2 s.h.

 

PA-653. Principles of Surgical Care. This course introduces surgical care and techniques. Topics covered include wound healing, pre- and post-operative management and specifics of surgical management of body systems. 2 s.h.

 

PA-654. Diagnostic Medicine I. This course provides instruction in basic and applied laboratory and radiologic studies.  The topics will align with the module topics of PA 614 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine I.  Prerequisites:  co-enrollment in PA 614 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine I  2 S.H.

 

PA-655. Diagnostic Medicine II. This course is a continuation of Diagnostic Medicine I and provides instruction in basic and applied laboratory and radiologic studies.  The topics will align with the module topics of PA 615 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine II and PA 616 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine III.  Prerequisites:  PA XXX Diagnostic Medicine I.  2 S.H.

 

PA-662. Pathophysiology I. This course reviews the basic physiologic regulatory mechanisms responsible for maintenance of homeostasis in the normal human and introduces the pathophysiologic alterations which occur in these mechanisms leading to specific disease processes. It also presents a molecular and genetic basic of disease, and it provides clinical correlations which support concurrent coursework involving the treatment of disease. Understanding the mechanisms of disease is essential in the role of the physician assistant. Prerequisites: None. 3 s.h. Fall.

 

PA-663. Pathophysiology II. This course will build on the knowledge gained in PA-660, reviewing the basic physiologic regulatory mechanisms responsible for maintenance of homeostasis in the normal human and introduces the pathophysiologic alterations which occur in these mechanisms leading to specific disease processes. It focuses on organ systems including respiratory, circulatory, renal, GI and endocrine, providing clinical correlations which support concurrent coursework involving the treatment of disease. Prerequisites: PA-660. 3  s.h. Spring.

 

PA-670. Clinical Rotation I. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-672. Clinical Rotation II. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-674. Clinical Rotation III. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-676. Clinical Rotation IV. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-678. Clinical Rotation V. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-679. Clinical Rotation VI. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-680. Clinical Rotation VII. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-682. Clinical Rotation VIII. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-685. Clinical Rotation Elective. This elective clerkship experience is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to have additional hands-on clinical experience in any of the eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery and long term care, or to gain experience in any specialty or subspecialty of medicine of their choice.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings.  The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-690. Graduate Project I. This three-credit course sequence will be scheduled during the clinical year of the program. The outcome for the graduate project is for the student to develop a physician assistant practice oriented project wherein he/she employs the principles of evidence-based practice by integrating current published medical research. In consultation with a faculty member the student will develop a clinically relevant question and/or community project. The student will be required to present his/her graduate project to the faculty and the PA program and the College of Health Professions community at the conclusion of the course.  1 s.h.

 

PA-691. Graduate Project II. This three-credit course sequence will be scheduled during the clinical year of the program. The outcome for the graduate project is for the student to develop a physician assistant practice oriented project wherein he/she employs the principles of evidence-based practice by integrating current published medical research. In consultation with a faculty member the student will develop a clinically relevant question and/or community project. The student will be required to present his/her graduate project to the faculty and the PA program and the College of Health Professions community at the conclusion of the course.  1 s.h.

 

PA-695. Research Methods for Hlth Professions. This course will introduce the Physician Assistant student to the research process as informed consumers and potential future participants in research. Topics covered include the characteristics of a research study, methods of control in experimental research, internal and external validity, experimental research designs, evaluation of research, statistics and test construction. Also addressed are scientific writing, strategies for conducting literature searches, research ethics and elements of a research proposal. 3.s.h, Fall. 

 

PT-695. Community Based Practice. This course provides an opportunity for individuals and/or small group of students to actively participate with faculty members or community preceptors in innovative community-based experiences that will improve the health needs of diverse communities.  Students will gain experience examining how their professional skills may be harnessed to respond to the health objectives embedded in Healthy People 2020.   1-3 var. s. h.

 

PT-700. Foundations of Physical Therapy. This course introduces the student to the history, development, and current issues of the physical therapy profession and the American Physical Therapy Association. The Code of Ethics and Core Values of Professionalism will be presented and discussed.  Legal and regulatory issues related to the physical therapy profession will be examined. Professional communication, intercultural communication, and cultural competence will be discussed in the context of patient/client and professional relations. The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) framework for patient/client management will be introduced.  2 s.h.

 

PT-701. Neuroscience. This course will thoroughly examine the structure and function of the human nervous system with emphasis on functional considerations related to clinical practice.  It will include a study of microscopic and macroscopic anatomical components of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous system with emphasis on the organization of functional systems.  The neurophysiological principles which are related to neural transmission and function of the various pathological conditions affecting nervous system will be emphasized and students will be expected to correlate the clinical manifestations with the anatomic location of the pathology. 4 S.H.

 

PT-705. Movement Science. Movement Science involves the study of human biomechanics and kinesiology based on an in-depth knowledge of applied human anatomy. Students begin with the study of general biomechanics (including Newton's laws, free body diagrams, and computation of vector quantities) and tissue mechanics (including the response of musculoskeletal tissues of interest under different loading conditions). The course then moves on an in-depth study of applied human anatomy and kinesiology by body region with emphasis on normal, gross form and function as it relates to the practice of Physical Therapy. 3 s.h.

 

PT-705L. Surface Anatomy Lab. The purpose of this laboratory course is to provide students the opportunity to develop palpation skills and to appreciate the differences of a variety of tissue types while learning clinical surface anatomy. The course uses a regional approach and is designed to correlate with the Human Anatomy course.  1 S.H.

 

PT-710. Adult Development & Aging. This course will examine foundational, clinical, and behavioral sciences pertinent to the examination, evaluation, and planning of treatment interventions for adults across the lifespan. We will focus on how to modify physical therapy examinations and interventions based on changes that occur in the body over time. The impact of ethical, legal and psychosocial issues affecting adults will also be presented.  3 s.h.

 

PT-711. Clinical Pathophysiology. Clinical Pathophysiology presents an in depth view of the pathogenesis of common disease processes and conditions. Included in the presentations and discussions are demonstrations of the progression of each pathologic condition at the cellular level and signs and symptoms at the macro level. The course content reflects the effects of pathologic processes on an individual's functional abilities and limitations, along with the relationship between disease related impairment and functional limitations as the key focus. Disease etiology along with prognosis are also presented in detail and the ICF model is used as an expert consensus document for the basic framework of the course content. Pathologic processes and conditions discussed include cellular injury and inflammation; tissue healing; immunology and diseases of the immune system; and neoplasia. Also discussed are infectious, cardiopulmonary, collagen vascular, hepatic, gastrointestinal, renal and endocrine diseases. 3 s.h.

 

PT-712. Applied Physiology and Nutrition. This course is designed to provide the student with a firm understanding of both the acute and chronic adaptations that occur in the human body in response to physical activity/exercise. An emphasis is placed on metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and musculoskeletal adaptations to exercise. Students will learn to administer and interpret a variety of tests and measurements used to assess fitness/athletic performance, and to develop sound exercise prescriptions based on the results of these tests.  The role of nutrition in optimizing health and performance will also be addressed.  This course will also help prepare interested students for the National Strength and Conditioning Association's Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) examination. 3 s.h.

 

PT-712L. Applied Physiology and Nutrition Lab. This laboratory course includes demonstration and practice of various testing and training methods available to physical therapists for assessing and improving the fitness of their clients in the five major fitness component areas:  cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. In addition, there will be lab time devoted to nutritional assessment concepts/techniques. 1 s.h.

 

PT-716. Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement. This course utilizes a format of lecture, laboratory experience, and case-based learning to prepare the student to use observational gait analysis techniques to identify specific gait abnormalities, the causes for these deviations, and propose treatment options for optimizing functional gait. 1.5 s.h.

 

PT-717. Differential Diagnosis. This course takes a systems approach in differential screening, interpretation of results, and differentiating dysfunction within the scope of physical therapist practice from those that indicate a referral to other health care practitioners. 2 S.H.

 

PT-718. Human Anatomy. This course in gross anatomy is designed to provide students with the knowledge of clinical anatomy necessary to practice their expertise upon graduation. The contents of the course include gross anatomy and an introduction to anatomical radiology, and is conducted to represent a survey of the entire human body. Teaching/learning methodologies include lectures and discussions, prosected human cadavers, and computer applications. The course is taught regionally (i.e. upper limb, lower limb, spine, etc.), and surveys all morphologic systems. 4 S.H. lecture, 1 S.H. lab. Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

 

PT-724. Therapeutic Exercise. This course provides an introduction to the theory, scientific principles, and evidence for the use of various types of exercise employed by physical therapists for the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of optimal health and physical function as well as the prevention of disease and movement dysfunction. Emphasis will also be placed on basic exercise techniques related to muscle performance (including strength, power, and endurance) and stretching/flexibility activities. The impact of environmental factors such as setting (acute care, home, gym setting, sports, aquatic, and industrial) and types of equipment (horse, balls, tubes, and bands) on exercise considerations is an important focus of this course. Case based instruction, evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning are emphasized throughout.  2 s.h.

 

PT-724L. Therapeutic Exercise & Massage. Laboratory sessions will provide instruction and experience in various modes of therapeutic exercise and massage. Emphasis will be placed on basic exercise techniques related to muscle performance (including strength, power, and endurance) and stretching/flexibility activities. The implementation of the Annual Check-Up By A Physical Therapist is an integral component of this course. Case based instruction, evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning are emphasized.   1.5 s.h.

 

PT-725L. Biophysical Agents. This course provides an introduction to the theory, scientific principles, and evidence for the use of various types of biophysical agents employed by physical therapists for the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of optimal health and physical function through both cognitive and psychomotor teaching methods. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the underlying indications for and practical application of a variety of modalities currently used in clinical practice. Laboratory sessions will provide instruction and experience in the application of biophysical agents for the management of pain, dysfunction, impaired muscle performance, range of motion limitations, and the delivery of medications. Emphasis will also be placed on safe and appropriate utilization of all physical agents for a variety of diagnoses and impairments. Case based instruction; evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning are emphasized.  1.5 s.h.

 

PT-727A. Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Pt A. This course will introduce students to common diseases/conditions involving the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and lymphatic systems, as well as the various types of interventions used to treat them.  There will be an emphasis on the role of the physical therapist in providing appropriate preventative and rehabilitative exercise programs and risk factor modification education for persons with, or at risk for cardiovascular, pulmonary, and/or lymphatic diseases/conditions 2 s.h.

 

PT-727B. Cardiovascular and Pulmonary PT B. This course will introduce students to common diseases/conditions involving the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and lymphatic systems, as well as the various types of interventions used to treat them.  There will be an emphasis on the role of the physical therapist in providing appropriate preventative and rehabilitative exercise programs and risk factor modification education for persons with, or at risk for cardiovascular, pulmonary, and/or lymphatic diseases/conditions. 1 s.h.

 

PT-727LA. Cardiovascular/Pulmon PT LabA. This laboratory course will assist student physical therapists in developing requisite entry-level cardiovascular, pulmonary, and lymphatic examination and treatment skills. Activities to be covered include: pulse palpation, blood pressure assessment, auscultation of heart and breath sounds, basic EKG interpretation, diagnostic and functional exercise testing, risk factor assessment, interpretation of lab values, bronchial hygiene, airway clearance techniques, and physical therapy treatment in the ICU setting. 1 s.h.

 

PT-727LB. Cardiovascular/Pulmon PT LabB. This laboratory course will assist student physical therapists in developing requisite entry-level cardiovascular, pulmonary, and lymphatic examination and treatment skills. Activities to be covered include: pulse palpation, blood pressure assessment, auscultation of heart and breath sounds, basic EKG interpretation, diagnostic and functional exercise testing, risk factor assessment, interpretation of lab values, bronchial hygiene, airway clearance techniques, and physical therapy treatment in the ICU setting. 1 s.h.

 

PT-728. Imaging/Electrophysiology for Physical T. This course reviews the foundations and principles of imaging and the use of imaging studies in physical therapy.  Case studies are used.  The course proceeds to cover the principles of the use of electrophysiologic studies with neuromuscular disease and injury. The role of the physical therapist specialist in electrophysiology, the process to become a clinical specialist, and the role of the non-specialist to make the appropriate referral are discussed.  Students enrolled in the course are required to attend a minimum of two imaging seminars that are conducted by the house staff of the MUSC Radiology Department.   2 S.H.

 

PT-730. Musculoskeletal I. Musculoskeletal I prepares students to be safe, proficient, and reflective physical therapy practitioners following the principles for evidence based practice regarding the examination, evaluation, diagnosis, establishing a prognosis and the treatment/management for the peripheral neurological and musculoskeletal systems related to post-surgical rehabilitation, injury, dysfunction, and/or medical problems.  The course focuses on the lower quarter. 3 s.h.

 

PT-730L. Musculoskeletal I Laboratory. This laboratory course provides students with the skill and practice to perform screening, examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, and intervention for lower quarter and associated areas of the musculoskeletal system. Emphasis is placed injuries, diseases, and factors that affect movement and function. Rehabilitation and therapeutic intervention techniques are practiced and integrated with previous learning experiences and case studies. 3 s.h.

 

PT-731. Musculoskeletal II. Musculoskeletal II is a 3 S.H. lecture 2 S.H. laboratory. Lecture: Musculoskeletal II is the second in a series of courses that prepares students to be safe, proficient, and reflective practitioners in examining and treating dysfunction and disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based practice, as well as current research and theory. Musculoskeletal II primarily addresses lower quarter problems and addresses the preferred practice patterns 4B-1 through 4J-1 from the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice.  Lab: The laboratory component of Musculoskeletal II provides detailed instruction and learning experiences focusing on the examination, evaluation and clinical management of individuals with lower quarter musculoskeletal problems and dysfunction. 3 s.h.

 

PT-731L. Musculoskeletal II Lab. This laboratory course provides students with the skill and practice to perform screening, examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, and intervention for upper quarter and associated areas of the musculoskeletal system. Emphasis is placed on injuries, diseases, and factors that affect movement and function. Rehabilitation and therapeutic intervention techniques are practiced and integrated with previous learning experiences and case studies. 2 s.h.

 

PT-732. Muscuskeletal III. Musculoskeletal III prepares students to be safe, proficient, and reflective physical therapy practitioners following the principles for evidence based practice regarding the examination, evaluation, diagnosis, establis.h.ing a prognosis and the treatment/management for the peripheral neurological and musculoskeletal systems related to post-surgical, injury, dysfunction, and/or medical problems.  The course focuses on the spine, pelvic girdle, and craniomandibular regions. 3 s.h.

 

PT-732L. Musculoskeletal III Lab. This laboratory course provides students with the skill and practice to perform screening, examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, and intervention for the spine and associated areas of the musculoskeletal system. Emphasis is placed on injuries, diseases, and factors that affect movement and function. Rehabilitation and therapeutic intervention techniques are practiced and integrated with previous learning experiences and case studies. 2 s.h.

 

PT-733. Prosthetics and Orthotics. This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to develop, integrate, and apply knowledge and skills necessary to examine and treat individuals with selected musculoskeletal impairments. Topics include management of clients needing spinal or foot orthoses and/or upper or lower limb prostheses. The laboratory sessions are designed to provide students with opportunities to apply examination and treatment techniques used in the management of such individuals. 1.5 s.h.

 

PT-740. Clinical Practicum I. (8 weeks) This is the student's first full-time onsite clinical learning experience supervised by a licensed physical therapist with a progression of learning opportunities, application techniques, and professional behavioral abilities. 8 s.h.

 

PT-741. Clinical Practicum II. (10 weeks)  Onsite clinical learning experience. 10 s.h.

 

PT-742. Clinical Practicum III. (10 weeks)  Onsite clinical learning experience. 10 s.h.

 

PT-743. Clinical Practicum IV. (12 weeks)  Onsite clinical learning experience.12 s.h.

 

PT-746. Health Promotion and Professionalism in. This course will focus on professional roles, responsibilities, and current issues affecting the physical therapy profession. It will emphasize the importance of community engagement to promote health and optimum wellness and prevent disease/secondary conditions associated with movement dysfunction. Students will be required to complete a health education community presentation on a topic chosen by the target audience. 2 S.H.

 

PT-748. Pharmacology. This course provides the student with knowledge concerning pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacotherapeutic principles, adverse effects, and interactions with medications commonly used with individuals in inpatient and outpatient settings. Student recognition of adverse effects and the influence of medications and natural remedies on function is emphasized with problem solving regarding communication with the individual and their health care providers and modifying the physical therapy program.  Pharmacological content is also covered in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological, and musculoskeletal portions of the curriculum.1 s.h.

 

PT-749. Healthcare Delivery. This course introduces students to various health care systems, legal and ethical issues affecting the delivery of health services, regulation of health care systems, and payment policy.  2 s.h.

 

PT-751. Integumentary Physical Therapy. This course is designed to provide student physical therapists to effectively examine and treat individuals with integumentary impairments.  2 s.h.

 

PT-752. Motor Development. Motor Development  explores normal development of gross motor, fine motor, language, self care, cognition, psychosocial, and play skills across the lifespan from in utero to young adulthood.  The course concentrates on embryology, introductory genetics, development of head control, trunk control, transitional movements, upright standing postures, and typical gross motor skills of children birth through young adulthood. Opportunities will be provided to experience and analyze gross motor development and movements in young children. Cultural considerations affecting motor development of children will also be reviewed. Discussion of motor development and recovery topics related to infants and children born prematurity, cardiac defect, arthrogryposis, myelomeningocele, and plagiocephaly will be introduced. 2 s.h.

 

PT-755. Neuromuscular I. This course is the first of two major courses that will provide students with a solid foundation in the examination of and interventions for individuals with neuromuscular disorders. The emphasis in this course will be on examination using the ICF framework emphasizing objective outcomes and evidence based interventions. Both traditional and contemporary models of neurological rehabilitation will be presented and the application of an integrated model will be emphasized. Lectures and discussions will utilize case studies to integrate information and enhance the development of clinical problem solving skills and translating evidence based practice into clinical practice. Psychosocial issues and their impact on patient outcomes will be discussed and volunteer patients and families will present the psychosocial aspects of their personal experiences. 3 s.h.

 

PT-755L. Neuromuscular I Lab. The emphasis in this course will be on examination using the ICF framework emphasizing objective outcomes and evidence based interventions. Application of an integrated model along with translating evidence into clinical practice will be emphasized and practiced on live patients. Volunteer patients and patient simulations will be utilized in lab sessions to promote the application of skills to real life situations. Psychosocial issues and their impact on patient outcomes will be discussed and volunteer patients and families will present the psychosocial aspects of their personal experiences. 3 s.h.

 

PT-756L. Neuromuscular II Lab. This course will focus on the physical therapy evaluation using the ICF framework related to chronic progressive neurological disorders and spinal cord injuries. Specific objective outcomes and translation of evidence based practice will be emphasized throughout the course. Labs will include patient interactions for patients with both spinal cord injury and a variety of progressive neuromuscular disorders to allow students to apply the information emphasized in lecture and lab. Psychosocial issues and their impact on patient outcomes will be discussed and volunteer patients and families will present the psychosocial aspects of their personal experiences. 2 s.h.

 

PT-756. Neuromuscular II. This course is the second of two major courses that will provide students with a solid foundation in the examination of and interventions for individuals with neuromuscular disorders. This course will focus on the physical therapy evaluation using the ICF framework related to chronic progressive neurological disorders and spinal cord injuries. Specific objective outcomes and translation of evidence based practice will be emphasized throughout the course. Lectures and discussions will utilize case studies to integrate information and enhance the development of clinical problem solving skills. Psychosocial issues and their impact on patient outcomes will be discussed and volunteer patients and families will present the psychosocial aspects of their personal experiences.3 s.h.

 

PT-760. Pediatrics. The pediatrics lecture course examines the etiology, impairments, evaluations, and evidence-based treatment interventions of children with disability across the life span. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health will serve as the framework for lectures to enhance the development of clinical reasoning skills. 3 s.h.

 

PT-760L. Pediatrics Laboratory. Pediatrics Lab offers a variety of demonstrations and hands-on clinical experiences related to pediatric physical therapy evaluations and evidenced-based treatment interventions for children with disabilities. It will serve to complement the pediatric didactic content. 1 s.h.

 

PT-761. Practice Management. This course introduces students to the following topics: current concepts and principles of management, development of a business plan for a new program/service, human resource management, and reimbursement updates. The goals of this course are to enhance understanding and facilitate development of professional and managerial skills necessary to function effectively as a member of a health care team.

 

PT-762L. Clin Reason/Practice Lab. This course emphasizes clinical reasoning and problem solving, through the presentation and discussion of progressive patient/client case studies with complex, multifactorial problems. Lecture and laboratory sessions assist in student preparation for the comprehensive examinations. Successful completion of both an online, multiple choice comprehensive curricular examination and a comprehensive Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) are required. 1 s.h.

 

PT-764. Evidence Based Practice I. The purpose of the evidence based practice (EBP) sequence in the Division of Physical Therapy is to provide students with the requisite skills to become consumers of the rehabilitation literature and upon completion of the program to apply the best available evidence to clinical practice.  EBP I will introduce topics related to research philosophy, research design, basic statistics, and psychometric properties of research.  The course will heavily revolve around practical examples from the physical rehabilitation literature as well as ongoing research within the College of Health Professions.  Student competency will be assessed via completion of class projects and written examinations.  1s,h

 

PT-765. Evidence Based Practice II. The purpose of the evidence based practice (EBP) sequence in the Division of Physical Therapy is to provide students with the requisite skills to become consumers of the rehabilitation literature and upon completion of the program to apply the best available evidence to clinical practice. EBP II will continue this sequence by reviewing selected statistical topics related to error, power, statistical design, parametric and non-parametric measures, and tests of group differences. EBP II will also review analyses of correlation and regression, as well as introduce students to the systematic review. The course will heavily revolve around practical examples from the physical rehabilitation literature as well as ongoing research within the College of Health Professions. Student competency will be assessed via completion of class projects and written examinations. 1 S.H.

 

PT-766. Evidence Based Practice III. This course requires students to review, discuss, rank, and critique peer reviewed journal articles related to research topics that have the potential to influence clinical decision-making in physical therapy. Students will use the literature as a tool to develop skills in the application of evidence-based practice with emphasis placed on determining the quality of the science and its presentation in the literature. The ultimate goal of this course is to ensure that students will be efficient and effective at analyzing the research literature in order to maximize the use of scientific evidence for clinical decision-making. 1 S.H.

 

PT-767. Evidence Based Practice IV. This course culminates the evidence-based practice curriculum and involves a final project illustrating proficiency with the collection, interpretation, and presentation of data. The course will involve classroom work to develop collection and presentation skills, and the final project will be an independently prepared case report to be completed during a clinical practicum.  The final project must include the selection of appropriate outcome measures and their publis.h.ed psychometric properties, evaluation of the patient at least at initial evaluation and discharge, presentation of the interventions, and a discussion of the results.  The posters will be developed with faculty mentoring during the clinical practicum and will be formally presented to the faculty upon return to campus. 1 s.h.

 

PT-768. Special Topics in Physical Therapy. This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore a specialized area of interest in physical therapy education, research, and/or clinical practice.  1-3 var. s.h.

 

 

 courses, emphasis remains on acquisition of nurse anesthesia technical skills and evidence-based clinical decision making utilizing low and high fidelity simulation. 2 s.h.

 

AFN-833. Clinical Simulation III. The emphasis is on acquisition of nurse anesthesia technical skills and clinical decision-making utilizing a combination of both low and high fidelity simulation.  For example, students will negotiate evidence-based simulated surgical procedures via an online simulation program (low-fidelity) as well as demonstrate hands-on patient care within a simulated operating room with a computerized patient mannequin (high fidelity).  In addition to the reinforcement of skills demonstrated in prior courses, this course includes insertion of invasive monitoring catheters. 1 s.h.

 

AFN-835. Advanced Pharmacology I. This course focuses on the basic and advanced clinical concepts of pharmacology and medication administration for the healthcare professional. Topics to be covered will include pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, pharmacology of the autonomic nervous system, pharmacology of the respiratory system, cardiac pharmacology, endocrine pharmacology and other topics relevant to pharmacology and medication administration. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-836. Advanced Pharmacology II. This course provides an exploration of the advanced clinical concepts of pharmacology for the anesthesia provider. The focus will be on the clinical application and utilization of anesthesia drugs and other medications relevant to anesthesia during the perioperative period. Application of principles of pharmacology to formulate proper strategies for providing an anesthetic while minimizing adverse effect will be utilized. 4 s.h.

 

AFN-838. Introduction to Clinical Anesthesia. Introduction to Clinical Anesthesia offers an in depth survey of the anesthetic management of diverse clinical topics. Topics include, but are not limited to, ambulatory surgery, ENT, Non-Operating Room Anesthesia (NORA), orthopedics, and transplant anesthesia. The focus of this course is to prepare the student for cases that are commonly encountered in clinical practice. The content is delivered via lecture, clinical case studies, and class discussion. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-841. Anesthesia Practicum I. First in a series of five clinical courses that develop proficiency in nurse anesthesia practice with an emphasis on integrating prior knowledge to decision-making and case management for various patient populations in the clinical area. 5 s.h.

 

AFN-842. Anesthesia Practicum II. Second in a series of five clinical courses that develop proficiency in nurse anesthesia practice. Emphasis on evidence-based practice and integration of knowledge to decision-making and case management for various patient populations. 10 s.h.

 

AFN-843. Anesthesia Practicum III. Third in a series of five clinical courses that develop proficiency in nurse anesthesia practice. Emphasis on complex case management and increasing autonomy and skill in the perioperative period. 10 s.h.

 

AFN-844. Anesthesia Practicum IV. Fourth in a series of five clinical courses that develop proficiency in nurse anesthesia practice. Emphasis on analyzing impacts of research on clinical practice and on increasing efficiency in decision-making and case management for various patient populations. 10 s.h.

 

AFN-845. Anesthesia Practicum V. Fifth in a series of five clinical courses that develop proficiency in nurse anesthesia practice. Emphasis is placed on autonomy and leadership in clinical practice. 10 s.h.

 

AFN-861. Foundations in Leadership. This course is an introduction healthcare  leadership. Students will develop an  understanding of the value of transformative  leadership in healthcare through critical  exploration of the literature. Students will  engage with leaders in administration, education,  policy, and research. 3 s.h.

 

AFN-871. Managing Change in Healthcare. This course will focus on the issues involved in  leading strategic change in complex health care  organizations. Five major areas will be explored:  the key elements of interventions and modes of  behavior used by change agents (including the  skills and qualities of successful change agents)  and specific examples of successful change and  implementation efforts. The narrative of  strategic change, management of uncertainty, the  importance of interpersonal skills and emotional  intelligence in the change process, the role of  individuals, teams, and consultants in leading  change will be topics of discussion. 3 s.h.

 

CVP-610. Pharmacology for Perfusion. This course presents the fundamental principles of pharmacology necessary for an understanding of the mechanisms of action of drugs and knowledge for their rational and effective use or monitoring. Principles which support the clinical applications of drugs to dynamic patients, who exist in a variety of health states, will be shared. Principles include pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenetics, and introductory therapeutics.  A discussion of the impact of aging and disease on drug safety and the drug development process will be made. Interprofessional experiences will be used to help student gain exposure to many of the challenges related to drug therapy, and team-based problem solving skills will be applied. 4 s.h.

 

CVP-700. Clinical Monitoring. This course is designed to give the perfusion student an understanding of how patients are monitored in the health care setting. Specific focus will be in the arena of cardiac services in and outside the operating room and areas where extracorporeal services are utilized. This course presents the history and theory related to the various physiologic monitoring parameters encountered in the clinical setting, along with the physics and principles of operation of the instrumentation commonly employed in the care of cardiac surgery patients or any patient requiring care via extracorporeal technology. 4 s.h.

 

CVP-702. Perfusion Technology I. This course is designed to give the beginning student a practical and theoretical orientation to the environment of extracorporeal circulation. This course presents the history, basic components, equipment, and physiology related to extracorporeal circulation. The students will be exposed to ethical issues facing health care providers in today's environment. 4 s.h.

 

CVP-703. Perfusion Technology Ii/Simulation Lab. This course will focus on clinical devices used for cardiopulmonary bypass and the development of key clinical skills used on a daily basis in clinical perfusion.  Students are taught equipment selection, set-up, and steps required for the safe operation of a life support system in a simulated operating room environment. 5 SH

 

CVP-704. Research Methodology. This course provides a background on general principles and issues in clinical research design. These are explored through the formulation of the research objective and the research hypothesis and the specification of the study population, the experimental unit, and the outcome variables. This course integrates core clinical perfusion principles to provide experience in the development and critique of the methodological aspects of clinical research protocols and the clinical research literature. Assigned readings are drawn from contemporary perfusion scientific literature. 3 s.h.

 

CVP-706. Perioperative Blood Mgmt. This course is designed to introduce the cardiovascular perfusion student to blood management strategies employed during cardiac surgery. Each lecture will focus, in depth, on the principles and practices of blood conservation and autotransfusion during extracorporeal support.  A review of hematology and coagulation monitoring will be included as part of the introduction to this topic. 2 s.h.

 

CVP-708. Pathophysiology for Perfusion Technology. This course is designed to introduce the cardiovascular perfusion student to the essential physiological elements of perfusion practice. Each lecture will focus, in depth, on the pathological conditions associated with cardiothoracic surgery and extracorporeal support.  Specific organ systems and biochemical responses to cardiopulmonary bypass in the aging population will be investigated. 4 SH

 

CVP-710. Fundamentals of Clinical Acid Based Chem. This course is designed to give the beginning student the principles of acid-base physiology and the interpretation and treatment of clinical acid-base disorders. 2 SH

 

CVP-712. Principles and Practices of Perfusion Te. This course prepares the student for clinical experience. The goal of this course is to expose perfusion students to extracorporeal techniques using combinations of lecture, independent research and in-vivo lab.  Students will be provided with the objectives of the lab. Experience with the techniques, collecting data in an organized and consistent matter, writing lab reports and participating in discussion gives students the opportunity to comprehend various extracorporeal techniques. 5 SH

 

CVP-714. Cardiac Assist Devices. This course introduces student to the advanced practice associated with cardiac assist devices. Selection, operation and monitoring of various cardiac assist devices including both FDA approved and investigational devices.  Other areas of focus will include patient education, community education, surgical coordination, clinical visits and managing VAD databases and clinical trials, including data analysis for presentations. 2 SH

 

CVP-716. Seminar I. This course will include case presentation and discussion of current practices and techniques in extracorporeal circulation from clinical rotations to introduce the students to the multiplicity of perfusion techniques from around the country. 1 SH

 

CVP-718. Pathophysiology. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the basic principles of human physiologic function.  Organ, tissue and cellular function is integrated through exploration of the major elements of overall homeostasis (i.e., health).  Emphasis is placed on the regulatory mechanisms, which integrate the functional systemsof the body and maintain the adult organism in a dynamic steady state.  Basic concepts of normal function are reinforced by consideration of many clinical and pathophysiological applications. 5 s.h.

 

CVP-719. Post Professional Pediatric Perfusion. This course reviews the anatomical and  physiological characteristics of congenital heart  defects and their implications for the conduct of  perfusion.  Special considerations in the conduct  of perfusion for congenital heart surgery are  discussed and modeled. 1 s.h.

 

CVP-720. Advanced Pediatric Perfusion. This course is designed to provide the student with students the anatomical and physiological characteristics of congenital heart defects, surgical repair techniques and the implications for cardiopulmonary bypass .Each week a series of related congenital heart defects are reviewed. Specific perfusion techniques related to the conduct of perfusion for congenital heart surgery will be discussed. 2 SH

 

CVP-722. Perfusion Simulation. This course introduces student to the advanced practice associated with cardiac assist devices. Selection, operation and monitoring of various cardiac assist devices including both FDA approved and investigational devices.  Other areas of focus will include patient education, community education, surgical coordination, clinical visits and managing VAD databases and clinical trials, including data analysis for presentations. 2 SH

 

CVP-724. Quality Improvement and Informatics. This course provides students with an understanding of quality management and performance improvement. This will include quality assessment, risk management, outcomes assessment, and benchmarking. The course focuses primarily on providing students with the necessary knowledge and skills for understanding systems improvement and then participating and leading quality improvement (QI) efforts. Students also gain knowledge of the importance of measuring and managing service excellence and patient satisfaction. This course also provides students with an introduction to health care information systems, with an emphasis on clinical information systems. Students are introduced to different types of clinical and administrative information systems used in health care today. 2 SH

 

CVP-726. Evidence-Based Medicine. This course will review research based on the  classifications of evidenced based medicine and  will include examples from the cardiovascular  surgery and perfusion literature. 2 SH

 

CVP-728. Leadership and Health Services Delivery. This course introduces students to the management  of health care facilities.  Students gain an  understanding of the major functions of  management, governance, organizational  structures, accreditation/licensure processes,  and reimbursement issues in health care  organizations.  Students will become familiar  with and understand the importance of the  principles of management including planning,  organizing, controlling, directing, and staffing  in order to offer health care services. The  course will also demonstrate the basic concepts  and issues associated with the management and  regulations of health care services delivery, and  explore the impact of contemporary public policy  issues confronting the health care system. 2 SH

 

CVP-730. Pathophysiology of Aging. This course presents a survey of the concepts of  human disease as part of the aging process. It  includes a study of immunological defense  mechanisms, acute and chronic inflammation,  repair mechanisms, modes of injury, diseases of  development and growth, and blood disorders and  neoplasia. 1 SH

 

CVP-760. Clinical Experience I. This course is designed to provide the perfusion student an introduction to the operating room and various clinical arenas within the hospital.  The student will learn to conduct diagnostic work-up procedures for cardiovascular diseases and other organ systems.  The student will integrate their knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology into the assessment and management of the patient undergoing cardiac surgery.  The student will also develop their clinical skills in choosing appropriate CPB circuitry, assembling and priming the components, and conducting cardiopulmonary bypass. 6 SH

 

CVP-762. Clinical Experience II A. Clinical Experience II (CE II) is the major  clinical course for senior Perfusion students.   Students have successfully completed Clinical  Experience I, Devices and Principles and  Practices where they have acquired the skills of  patient work-up, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)  techniques, set-up and prime, as well as all  didactic work and physiology, which includes  intensive in vivo laboratories. CE II will begin  developing the student's skills in management of the patient before, during, and after CPB.  6 s.h.

 

CVP-763. Clinical Experience II B. Clinical Experience II (CE II) is the major  clinical course for senior Perfusion Students.   Student have successfully completed Clinical  Experience I, Devices and Principles and  Practices where they have acquired the skills of  patient work-up, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)  techniques, set-up and prime, as well as all  didactic work and physiology, which includes  intensive in vivo laboratories.  CE II will begin  developing the student's skills in management of  the patient before during, and after CPB. 6 s.h.

 

CVP-764. Clinical Experience IIIA. This advanced course is designed to complete the  student's clinical experience. The student will  be expected to perform as though unsupervised in  all routine cardiovascular procedures and will  operate more complex devices. The student will be  on call for weekend and emergency procedures. 6  SH

 

CVP-765. Clinical Exerience IIIB. This advanced course is designed to complete the  student's clinical experience. The student will  be expected to perform as though unsupervised in  all routine cardiovascular procedures and will  operate more complex devices. Students will  choose either a leadership, pediatrics perfusion  or cardiac assist track. 6 SH

 

CVP-770. Masters Research Project II. In this course the student develops a research project relating to cardiovascular perfusion resulting in a substantive paper that involves original collection or treatment of data and/or results in a research paper. Students select a clinical hypothesis to test and complete a research proposal in a topic pertinent to perfusion. The capstone project must evidence scholarly and/or professional analysis informed by the sustained and appropriate application of analytical methodologies. The final product of the research project must be a paper of publishable quality. This research project involves original research and exemplifies an original contribution to scholarship.  3 SH

 

CVP-771. Masters Research III. In this final research course, the student submits their research project for presentation and publication. The course requirements will include editorial changes suggested during peer review process. The capstone project will be completed by submitting the final paper for publication in a peer-reviewed perfusion related journal. 3 SH

 

CVP-772. Masters Research Project I. This course provides a background on general  principles and issues in clinical research  design. These are explored through the  formulation of the research objective and the  research hypothesis and the specification of the  study population, the experimental unit, and the  outcome variables. This course integrates on core  clinical perfusion principles to provide  experience in the development and critique of the  methodological aspects of clinical research  protocols and the clinical research literature.  Assigned readings are drawn from contemporary  perfusion scientific literature. 3 SH

 

CVP-773. Masters Research Project II. In this course the student develops a research  project relating to cardiovascular perfusion  resulting in a substantive paper that involves  original collection or treatment of data and/or  results ins a research. The final product of a  research project is a paper of publishable  quality. This research project involves original  research and exemplifies an original contribution  to scholarship.4 SH

 

CVP-774. Masters Research III. In this final research course, the student submits  their research project for presentation and  publication.  The course requirements will  include editorial changes suggested during peer  review process.  The capstone project will be  completed by submitting the final paper for  publication in a peer-reviewed perfusion related  journal.

 

DHA-800. Organizational Behavior. This course will assist students in developing a framework for thinking about the organizational world of healthcare and its complexity. The specific emphasis will be health services organizations and management research, with an emphasis on organizational theory and organizational behavior. Organization theory is a set of approaches to the understanding of how organizations form, survive and grow, interact with each other, recruit and process members, gain and manage resources, and deal with problems both internal and external (Kilduff). Emphasis is placed on the study of organization structures, principles, techniques and processes as they relate to the management of health services organizations. Opportunities to gain a better understanding of organizational behavior issues such as motivation, leadership, group and team dynamics, emotion and affect, and diversity and inclusion are provided in case analyses and readings. The primary goals of this course are to apply relevant theories to a range of organizational problems and attain skills needed to be an effective leader and researcher in health services organization and management. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-801. Financial Managment. The focus of this course will be to improve the executive's ability to use financial information for strategic decision making. This will be accomplished through a review of the concepts and methods for financial analysis for healthcare organizations. This includes capital investment analysis with an emphasis on valuation, benchmarking, and marginal analysis. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-802. Healthcare Leadership. This class serves as an introduction to leadership course challenging students to explore their understanding of the importance of leadership in health administration. Students will utilize the knowledge and skill they acquire through experience, academic literature, research, and discussion as they participate in class discussions and exercises. In this process students are challenged to expand their current leadership knowledge in an interdisciplinary healthcare environment and develop their critical thinking abilities. Students will also improve their understanding of leadership in its historical context by analyzing the behavior and accomplishments of well-known leaders in history and literature. The capstone of the course will be a leadership self-assessment paper submitted at the end of the course.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-804. Global and Community Health. This course is designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of community and global health concepts and issues.  This course covers demographic measurement, epidemiological methods, outcome assessment, health promotion and disease prevention from a managerial perspective.  Major issues concerning community health status and health risks will be explored.  In addition, the significance of global health issues, and their varying relationships to U. S. national security and public health policies, will be analyzed.  Community health: This course will introduce the student to the concept of using epidemiology as a managerial tool in designing, planning, implementing, and evaluation health care for populations.  Emphasis will be placed on basic epidemiologic principles and methods, and their role in managing health care services for a community or population.  Goals of this course component include: (1) enabling students to understand what is meant by epidemiology, as the basic science for community health and health care management; (2) enabling students to understand that epidemiology provides needed information for disease prevention, treatment of disease, and management of health care services; (3) providing an opportunity for students to apply epidemiologic methods and reasoning to health problems, as well as health care managerial decisions; and (4) increasing the ability of students to comprehend and evaluate health care literature.  Global health: This course will introduce the student to the range of public health, health policy and national security issues in the U. S. that have been created by ongoing developments in global health.  Issues to be covered include the spread of new and emerging infectious diseases, and their impact on global and domestic travel, migration, tourism, trade and economic development; and the growing threat of bioterrorism.  Goals of this course component include: (1) enabling students to understand the inevitable relationships between health administration leadership and the changing global health environment; (2) showing students how global health developments lead to new issues for U. S. health managers and policymakers; (3) providing an opportunity for students to examine current global health issues, including HIV/AIDS and bioterrorism; and (4) increasing the ability of students to apply global health knowledge to their own professions and work environments.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-805. Qualitative Methods. This course provides students in the Doctorate of Health Administration program with an introduction to both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies that are used in health services research. The course enables students to nderstand the key elements of a research proposal and study. The student will begin developing skills in framing a researchable problem, formulating a research question or query, and designing a methodological approach. In addition, the course aims to enhance students' critical thinking skills in evaluating published research studies.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-807. Managing Healthcare Information. This course provides a senior-level view of the issues surrounding the adoption and use of information technology in health care. Students gain insight into national initiatives underway to further the development, expansion, and deployment of health care information systems (including clinical applications such as electronic health records, e-prescribing, provider order entry, disease management) and discuss their ramifications at the state and local levels. Issues surrounding the management of health information resources at the institutional level are also explored including topics such as strategic information systems planning; system selection and implementation; IT governance and management; IT budgeting; management's role in major IT initiatives; assessing and achieving value of health care information systems. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-808. Health Politics & Advocacy. This course is designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of the structure and functioning of the health policy process, particularly at the national level.  Macro and micro-level models of the health policymaking process, and the operation of policy marketplaces, are described in the lectures and readings, along with applications of the models to health policymaking cases.  There is a special focus on examining the current and possible future tradeoffs at the national government level between health services delivery preferences, and growing resource limitations.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-809. Change Management&negotiation. This course focuses on the leadership and management of change in an organizational setting. Specifically, the course seeks to help students understand the dynamic relationship between external demands for change and internal objectives to meet stakeholder demand. The course will focus on organizational development strategies as well as individual negotiation skills to facilitate organizational change in the healthcare setting.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-811. Current Topics in Healthcare. The course will focus on current topics of interest and importance to the delivery and administration of healthcare. Activities will vary, but include critical reading of selected applied health services research publications, discussion of controversial and current issues facing healthcare administration professionals.

 

DHA-812. Evidence Based Decision Making. This course is the rigorous evaluation of the impact of different options that are available for treating a given medical condition for a particular set of patients. Topics include, 1) a review of research designs and statistics methods for comparative effectiveness research, 2) measurement of efficacy, effectiveness, cost and quality of life, 3) benchmarks for economic value, cost effectiveness, cost utility, and budget impact, 4) mathematical approaches for estimating expected outcomes; decision trees and Markov models. Use of current literature will be required as a means to examine examples of good and bad study design.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-814. Study Execution. This is an advanced seminar on principles and techniques for designing and implementing health care and managerial research studies. Students will learn to critically assess the literature and develop a dissertation proposal concept summary based on a topic of interest to them. The course will build on topics and research methods introduced in DHA XXX (Qualitative Methods). 3 S.H.

 

DHA-850. Population Health Management. This course focuses on the development of skills  and knowledge necessary for the DHA to enter into  new and innovative leadership roles in addressing  the health of populations. Population Health  Management (PHM) is a set of strategies and  mechanisms, tailored to the unique  characteristics and needs of populations,  designed to optimize health status, patient  experiences, cost and utilization:  The Triple  Aim. PHM integrates facets of the healthcare  delivery system, including providers, payers and  hospital systems; communities; environment;  patient characteristics, behaviors, and  engagement; and public health systems to meet  outcome objectives.  PHM is a data driven  approach and is organized around the four pillars  of population health: chronic care management,  quality and safety, health policy, and public  health.  The course focuses on using data and  analytics to execute the population health  management process.  Analytics allow students to  understand populations, including health  outcomes, patterns of health drivers and the  policies and interventions that link these two.   Additional course content as it applies to  population health management will include health  systems theory, evidence-based practice  principles, epidemiological concepts, and  enabling informatics concepts.  Students will  have the opportunity to apply the course content  to case studies and will assess and analyze a  population health problem in groups. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-865. Seminar in National Health Policy. This course builds on the knowledge of the general health policymaking process provided in Foundations in Health Policy (DHA-868).  It is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of the structure and functioning of the health policy process, particularly at the national level.  The central didactic component of this class consists of a series of visits to Federal health agencies and health professional organization offices in Washington, DC.  These sessions will include presentations by and discussions with agency and other policy-relevant health professionals. Prerequisites: DHA-868  3 s.h.

 

DHA-867. Quantitative Methods for Research. This course is designed to give students the skills to use data sets and conduct quantitative analysis to address research questions. The course will use actual public-use secondary data sets to provide students experience with data management. The course will also provide presentation of statistical principles and methods most commonly used in health services research. Finally, the course will prepare students in the use of SPSS statistical analysis software. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-872. Leadership III. This class serves as the cumulative leadership course in the DHA program. You will apply the knowledge and skills you have acquired through academic literature, research and lectures as you participate in online and class discussions and exercises. This course will synthesize all the portions of the program and your experiences in your careers leading to potential changes and personal growth.  3 s.h.

 

DHA-874. Interprofessional Studies. This course provides the foundation for health professionals to serve as interprofessional leaders in health professions education and health care delivery.  Through course activities, students will learn concepts and issues in interprofessional education and interprofessional collaborative practice.  These include interprofessional competency frameworks, effective team work principles and models for team performance in health care, research in inteprofessional education and practice, and approaches to interprofessional learning.

 

DHA-876. Evidence-Based Healthcare. This course will provide an introduction to the utilization of best evidence in the practice of healthcare among multiple disciplines.  What is considered evidence by different professions is covered. The course begins with the literature review of EBM, research methods, development of relevant clinical questions and moves to successful search strategies, ending with the application of the evidence to improving quality of care. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-878. Advanced Information Systems. Comprehensive study of the role and impact of IT (Information Technology) in health services organizations.  Specific emphasis on the role IT plays from clinical and managerial perspectives.  Topics include electronic health record, clinical decision support, privacy, patient safety, and security and confidentiality. 3 s.h.

 

DHA-880. DHA Independent Study. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of healthcare administration.  1-3 S.H variable

 

DHA-990. Doctoral Project. Upon completion of the Doctoral Project, credit will be applied to complete the degree requirements. Specific guidelines for the Project and Committee composition are outlined in the DHA Policy Manual.  .5-18 var. s.h.

 

HAP-620. Healthcare Reimbursement Systems. This course integrates information about the various U.S. healthcare payment systems.  It examines the complex financial systems within today's healthcare environment and how payment systems function.  The course gives the student an appreciation for the complexity of reimbursement systems and an understanding of the profund impact they have had on providers, payers, consumers, public policy makers, and the development of classification and information technology over time.  3 s.h.

 

HAP-622. Healthcare Marketing. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the key principles underlying strategic marketing and how these principles are applied in the health care industry.  The course will expose students to marketing fundamentals and demonstrate how an application of these fundamental principles should be applied to the overall strategic plan of a health care organization. 1.5 S.H. Summer and Fall

 

HAP-632. Quality Management of Health Care Servic. This course is intended to provide the student with an understanding of components of a quality management program-quality assessment, risk management, utilization management, and patient safety. JCAHO standards for measuring quality will be introduced. Students will learn and apply principles, processes, and tools used in Quality Improvement. Students will also learn about outcomes assessment and the need for doing risk adjustment. An understanding of the types of data elements and information systems requirements needed for assessing outcomes, quality, and appropriate utilization will also be presented. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-635. The Language of Medicine. The Language of Medicine is a course designed to expose students to the clinical aspects of healthcare.  The course introduces students in Health Administration and Policy to a word-building technique that enables them to substantially understand medical terms used in clinical settings.  The course provided an introduction to disease processes.  Common abbreviations and acronyms used in patient care are also introduced.  It is believed that the knowledge gained from this course will enable students to communicate and interact more effectively with practitioners in healthcare facilities and better understand the meaning of clinical data.  The course is particularly recommended for students with no clinical experience in healthcare. 1 S.H.

 

HAP-702. Health Care Financing. This course will provide students with an understanding of the variety of mechanisms for financing health care in the United States. Of particular interest are the consequences that each mechanism has for the cost and efficiency with which health care is provided. Specific topics include the range and implications of service payment mechanisms, mechanisms for capital acquisition and their effects, organizational structures, markets for firm governance, and for-profit vs. not-for-profit enterprises. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-704. Health Policy. This course is designed to provide students with a conceptual and analytical understanding of health policymaking and politics. Political and policymaking institutions and processes that affect the structure and functioning of the U. S. health care system will be examined. Fundamental concepts and issues associated with political decision making and the delivery of health services will be explored, including the impact of constitutional and other legal provisions, the activities of political parties and interest groups, the involvement of health professional associations and client organizations, and the relationships between economic factors and evolving health policymaking patterns. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-705. Health Economics. This course is designed to provide students with a conceptual and analytical understanding of health economics. Health care systems in the United States will be examined from the perspective of supply, cost and demand determination. Fundamental concepts and issues associated with economic decision-making and selected economic issues will be explored through the application of various socioeconomic concepts and behavioral models. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-719. Health Care Manage & Operation. This course provides the student with an understanding of the major functions of management including planning, organizing, directing and controlling. Students gain an understanding of governance, organizational structures, accreditation/licensure processes, and reimbursement issues in health organizations. 1.5 s.h.

 

HAP-721. Health Care Delivery Systems. This course is a systematic approach to understanding the origin and evolution of the U.S. health care delivery system. Topics include the history of medical care in the U.S., description of the variety of health personnel and facilities that comprise the system, including an investigation of selected contemporary health policy issues, public health, mental health, and alternative systems. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-722. Health Behavior & Epidemiology. An introduction to health behavior and the principles, strategies, and perspectives of epidemiology. Examples are drawn from selected diseases, health relevant behaviors, and health service problems. The course provides a general understanding of health states of populations, prevention efforts and the basic conceptual tools for translating epidemiological findings. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-725. Statistical Analysis in Health Systems. Systematic instruction in research design and selected methods for health services research. Introduction to the use of ANOVA, simple regression, multiple regression, discriminant analysis and path analysis as statistical techniques that might be applied in health administration and health care research. Prerequisite: Completion of at least one undergraduate level statistics course with a grade of 147C148 or better. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-726. Health Care Accounting. This course introduces the student to selected financial accounting topics such as principles of health care accounting, financial statement preparation, governance and internal control, financial statement analysis, capital structure and leverage, working capital management, stock and bond valuations. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-729. Financial Mgmt for Hc Organizations. This course introduces the student to selected strategic finance topics such as cost concepts, costing systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, cost and revenue prediction, pricing strategies, budgeting, variance analysis, inventory management, performance evaluation, and incentive compensation.  Prerequisite: HAP-726. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-730. Healthcare Project Management. This course is designed to provide students with an overview of Operations Management within a healthcare organization. More specifically, it will focus on the many tools available to assess the organization's strategic and tactical position as well as the tools and techniques required to shift an organization from its current state to one closer to the leadership's stated vision. Emphasis will be placed on using project management as the discipline used to deliver on strategic objectives, including a review of the required governance that must be in place to be effective. Students will be expected to demonstrate project management tools and techniques through the implementation of a semester-long project within the community.

 

HAP-735. Health Law & Risk Management. This course introduces the student to legal concepts and issues related to health care management. Special topics include liability, risk management, patient-provider relationships, fraud and abuse, antitrust, and health legislation. This course will also examine selected business law topics including agency and partnership, business corporations, and joint ventures. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-737. Organization Theory and Behavior. This course introduces the major historical and contemporary theories of organization and human behavior in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on the study of organization structures, principles, techniques and processes as they relate to the management of health services organizations. Opportunities to gain a better understanding of organizational behavior issues such as motivation, leadership, decision-making, interpersonal conflict, and group dynamics are provided in case analyses and skill building exercises.  3 s.h.

 

HAP-738. Management and Health Information Systems. This course provides an overview of the variety of information systems used in health care. Concepts related to strategic information systems planning will be introduced. The intent of the course is to give students a broad understanding of the use of technology in health care to manage both clinical and administrative information. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-739. Strategic Mgmt in Healthcare Services. This course includes health care administrative decision making with emphasis on analyzing business problems, formulating policies, and implementing plans for action. Comprehensive cases provide the opportunity to study the proper interrelationships among production/operations, marketing, human resources, and the other functions involved in managing a health care enterprise. Special emphasis is place on the planning function and the principles of health care marketing. 3 s.h.

 

HAP-740. Human Resource Management. This course addresses the traditional personnel functions in health service organizations such as recruitment, selection, job analysis, performance appraisal, compensation/benefits, employee health and safety, grievance, collective bargaining, employee discipline, and discharge. Additionally, current social, behavioral, and legal issues are discussed from a human resource planning and management perspective. The student will not only gain a better understanding of human resource processes, procedures, and issues, but will also acquire skills important to the effective management of people in organization.  3 s.h.

 

HAP-743. Managing Across the Continuum of Care. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the role and functions of the health care manager in a variety of health care settings (examples include physician group practice, long term care, home care). Students have an opportunity to work with individual in these areas and obtain practical experience. Special attention is given to the unique regulations and standards governing the management of these organizations as well as the key issues facing key stakeholders in these settings. Additionally, students are introduced to career opportunities in consulting, the pharmaceutical industry, and entrepreneurial initiatives.  3 s.h.

 

HAP-753. Seminar in Ethical Leadership. This course is intended to help students gain insight into ethical considerations in several settings: individual; organizational; bioethical and in the concept or organizational social responsibility. Students will gain an appreciation for the historical roots of western ethical precepts as the foundation for our current legal and ethical principles. Students apply a model of ethical resolution through cases as well as more recent developments in the public press. The ACHE code of Ethics will specifically be reviewed while other professional codes of ethics will be referenced, highlighting the concept of distinguishing individual, organizational, and professional ethics. In addition, students will be exposed to and discuss several advanced tools of leadership including building alliances, persuasion, negotiation, motivating others, gender bias in the workplace and self-development. These tools will be highlighted and discussed for their leadership value and ethical implications. 1-3 var. s.h.

 

HAP-754. Summer Internship. The Internship is an essential component of the Residential MHA Program.  It is intended to provide MHA students with opportunities to apply theories and techniques learned in the classroom to actual situations, issues or problems within the healthcare community.  It provides a student an opportunity to work with an experienced healthcare manager in a health care facility for a concentrated ten-week period of time.  The scope of the Internship is broad and students should expect to be involved in a wide-range of management-level activities.  Students may expect to be engaged in at least two projects as a component of the Internship experience.  10 S.H. Summer

 

HAP-756. Executive Skills I. This course is the first course of two Executive Skills courses. It is taught seminar style and provides multiple opportunities for students to improve writing and presentation skills as well as engage with professionals from the healthcare community. Guest speakers and special events augment classroom discussion and experiences. The purpose of this class is to help students develop executive skills that will maximize their opportunities for success, and prepare students for presenting themselves in the best possible light. 1 s.h.

 

HAP-757. Executive Skills II. This course is the second course of two Executive Skills courses. It is taught seminar style and provides multiple opportunities for students to improve writing and presentation skills as well as engage with professionals from the healthcare community. In addition, students will be exposed to and digest advanced literature in organizational leadership. The purpose of this class is to help students develop executive skills that will maximize their opportunities for success, and prepare students for presenting themselves in the best possible light. 1 s.h.

 

HCS-300. Intro to Health Behavior/Educ. This course will explore theoretical models and concepts of health behavior and education using a social-ecological framework as well as change management models. The use of models in the development of health education interventions will be covered. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-302. Foundations of Public Health. This course will introduce students to the field of public health, including its history and development. Students will review the major disciplines of public health as well as its key components. Current public health challenges will be examined worldwide, in the US, and in South Carolina. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-304. Social Determinants of Health. This course will examine the fundamental determinants of health, including socioeconomic status, stress, social support, and early life experiences. Students will focus on selected determinants of health and health issues that are relevant to the United States and South Carolina. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-307. Academic and Scientific Writing. This course will strengthen student competencies  in academic and scientific scientific writing as  a process, students will learn to navigate a  diversity of genres, communicate complex  information in plain language, edit for clarity  and tone, and think critically about a document's  audience, message, and purpose. 2 s.h.

 

HCS-308. Ethical Issues in Health Practice and Re. This course will introduce ethical thinking and concepts regarding health practice, health policy, and research. The course will prepare students to understand, evaluate, and participate in ethical decision making. 1 s.h.

 

HCS-310. Program Planning and Implementation. This course will provide the techniques for assessing needs, planning, writing objectives, developing logic models and Gantt charts, and implementing health promotion programs in the clinic, workplace, and community. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-312. Overview of the U.S. Health Care System. This course will provide an overview of the structure and components of the U.S. healthcare system, as well as the different professions. Students will review public and private healthcare insurance plans. 3. s.h.

 

HCS-314. Applied Research and Statistics in the. This course will provide students with an extracting statistical information. Students will assess evidence presented in the health sciences and be able to understand and evaluate evidence for treatment effectiveness and health disparities. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-316. Etiology and Pathophysiology of Chronic. This course provides a broad overview of the most common chronic diseases. Throughout the semester, aspects of disease epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment will be explored. The course will begin with an overview of foundational vocabulary and concepts, as well as a broad analysis of the most common chronic diseases. A framework for the basic disease processes will be established before moving on to discussions of specific organ systems. The course will conclude with a consideration of diseases that impact multiple organ systems. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-318. Evaluation of Health Promotion. This course introduces the topic of program planning and evaluation in public health settings. Each class is intended to provide the foundation for the knowledge needed to understand the basic program planning and evaluation process in a variety of public health settings including state and local health departments, national public health agencies, nonprofit organizations, and international public health settings. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-320. Introduction to Health Policy. The course will provide students with a broad, contextual overview of healthcare policy, policy implications, and factors driving policy outcomes. Through the use of case studies, peer-reviewed articles and current events, this course will provide a framework for understanding how politics influences policy and how social as well as political forces shape healthcare delivery in the United States. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-322. Health and Disease Across the Lifespan. This course will introduce the basic principles that promote health of individuals throughout the lifespan. It will examine the physiological, socioeconomic, cultural, and behavioral factors that impact health, disease, and quality of life across the lifespan. This course will emphasize the role of health promotion and disease prevention across different life stages, and the impact of aging on health and disease; it will discuss major causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-324. Principles of Epidemiology. In this introductory course, students will learn and apply basic concepts of epidemiology to multiple domains of public health. The course covers applications of epidemiologic methods and procedures to the study of the distribution and determinants of health and diseases, morbidity, and mortality in populations. Topics include quantitative aspects of epidemiology, data sources, measures of morbidity and mortality, evaluation of association and causality, and study design. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-330. Practicum Development. This course is a series of self-guided developmental activities resulting in the formulation of a learning contract to be used to complete the senior practicum. Students will build on the previous learning experiences, completion of self-assessments, and identification of personal and career goals to develop senior practicum goals, learning objectives, learning strategies, evidence of learning, and evaluation. 1 s.h.

 

HCS-402. Principles of Health Navigation. This course will provide an overview of the role  and competencies related to patient navigation in  health care delivery. The course will provide you  with an understanding of the role and impact of  accessing and analyzing patient health  information and social determinants that impact  health services delivery, health insurance, and  overall care of the individual. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-404. Delivering Culturally Sensitive Care. This course will introduce students to the  importance of delivering culturally sensitive  education and care to diverse populations. This  course will examine both analytical and practical  approaches to cultural competency in health  promotion and healthcare delivery. Concepts,  models, frameworks, and communication that occur  in cross-cultural health situations will be  discussed, as well as the application of these  concepts in real interventions and programs. 3  s.h.

 

HCS-406. Global Health. This course is designed to provide students with  an overview of factors related to illness,  health, and healing from a comparative  perspective that transcends national borders and  regional interests, and takes cultural difference  and cross-cultural diversity into account. It  will introduce global health using its  contemporary definition, determinants,  development and direction as a field into a broad  global context. Using the language of global  health, it will also discuss health systems  financing and delivery infrastructure for various  countries globally. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-408. Social Marketing. This course is designed to familiarize students  with current theory and knowledge in the field of  social marketing and to analyze the components  and applications of marketing used for promoting  health behavior change strategies. Social  marketing uses audience research to determine  target audience segmentation into groups with  common risk behaviors, motivations, and  information channel preferences. Key audience  segments are then reached with the mix of  intervention strategies formed by the 4 P's of  social marketing, namely product, price, place,  and promotion. The final product is designed  based on the needs and desires of the consumer  and persuasive messages promoting behavior change  are promoted to the target audience. Continuous  evaluation and message revision allows for  continual refinement on the basis of consumer  feedback. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-410. Rural Public Health. Rural residents face distinct health challenges  due to economic conditions, cultural/behavioral  factors, and health provider shortages that  combine to impose striking disparities in health  outcomes among rural populations. This course  will address specific diseases and disorders  faced by rural populations, service delivery  challenges, practitioner shortfalls in rural  areas, and promising community health approaches  and preventive measures. The course also  addresses rural healthcare ethics and  international perspectives. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-412. Leadership in the Health Professions. The purpose of the course is to introduce  principles and theory of leadership and  management in the health professions.  Leadership  and management concepts, principles and practices  will be presented.  Students will be introduced  to strategic planning, grant development and team  building and training. Studies will investigate  their own leadership skill set and determine  strategies they can use to improve these skills.  Students will learn how to incorporate cultural  competence in leadership and management.  Lastly,  students will learn how to address conflict  resolutions and negotiations. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-414. Foundations of Health Informatics. This course will provide the foundation in Health  Informatics. It will provide you with an overview  of basic database architecture, design and file  structure, and data warehousing and data mining  in health care. This course will also encompass  learning about the health information exchanges,  data standards, health informatics ethics, online  resources and E-research. 3 s.h.

 

HCS-480. Guided Practicum. This course provides students an opportunity to  apply learning outside a classroom setting to  gain practical knowledge of a chosen healthcare  profession. Students will identify an area for  exploration, innovation or improvement in a  chosen healthcare profession. This practicum  experience allows students to complete activities  to validate mastery of learning objectives which  the student has designed to fulfill previously  discovered interests and needs. The foundation  for the practicum course is the learning contract  developed in HCS-330. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-700. Database Management. This course focuses on the fundamentals of database design, data organization and utilization. Topics include database types, data warehouses, data marts, integration and interoperability of heterogeneous data sources, data manipulation and processing, application programming interfaces and health care data architectures. Other topics include data types, data standards, information classification, open EHRs, Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR), and analytics applications architectures. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-701. Health Informatics Foundations and Mgmt. This course provides the student with a fundamental understanding of the foundations of health informatics including in terms of its context within the modern health care system and also an understanding of the competencies in relation to health informatics project management. Topics covered include the role of health informatics and analytics in relation to the Affordable Care Act, accountable care organizations, value-based care and population health; meaningful use and other aspects of the health care system. The course will also introduce the student to management concepts and project management specifically within the context of health informatics and health information technology projects. 3 s. h.

 

HIN-702. Intro to Health Care Information Systems. This course provides students with an overview of various clinical and administrative information systems and critical functions used in health care. Key topics include electronic health records, computerized provider order entry, decision support, eprescribing, telemedicine/telehealth, and revenue cycle. Students explore the history, adoption and use of various types of health care information systems and gain insight into the process of selecting and implementation of health IT systems. Reporting requirements and senior level management issues related to the adoption, use and management of health care information systems are also discussed. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-704. Health Care Data-Content, Standards and. This course provides an overview of various types of health care data, different strategies for representing data, information and knowledge including terminologies and ontologies, database concepts (data modeling, relational databases, and structured query language), clinical data warehouses and data mining. Students explore the differences between transactional systems and analytical systems. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-706. Systems Analysis and Design. This course provides the student with a fundamental understanding of the systems life cycle, and key processes involved in the analysis, design, implementation, evaluation and ongoing maintenance and support of health care information systems. Students participate in a hypothetical system selection and implementation process and gain experience in defining system requirements, evaluating vendor products, negotiating contracts and project management. Students also gain experience in mapping clinical workflow and process improvement, and in optimizing the use of health IT to facilitate patient care and improve efficiency. Additionally, students will study different methods for assessing the value of health IT investments. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-708. Applied Statistical and Research Methods. This course provides a working knowledge of approaches to the analysis of archival data for research and quality improvement purposes. Students gain practice in reading, understanding, and presenting statistical materials. Topics include data set and variable descriptions; issues of ascertainment bias associated with retrospective data; criteria for the selection of descriptive statistics; visual presentation of parameters; formulation of hypotheses appropriate for the data; multivariable analysis for continuous dependent variables; log transformation and gamma distribution models; logistic regression; Kaplan Meier curves; controls for selection bias; use of factor and cluster analysis for data reduction. Statistical software package required. Students are also introduced to research methods and how to critically evaluate the literature. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-710. Data Mining and Analytics. With the continued influx of computers into every aspect of the healthcare environment, huge amounts of data are being generated and stored. To translate the vast amount of data into information and knowledge, health care provider organizations need to be able to extract information knowledge and patterns from data to remain competitive in the market and promote advances in health care (e.g. comparative effectives). Students will gain an understanding of the principles of data mining and machine learning and will gain hands-on experience in implementing data mining projects. This course will cover techniques and topics that are widely used in real-world data mining projects including classification, clustering, dimension reduction, feature selection, machine learning algorithms and open-ended knowledge discovery. Class assignments and projects will use real-world data sets and tools to apply the data analytical skills being learned. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-712. Applied Health Informatics. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to engage in solving real world clinical and business informatics issues using a case-based approach. Working in teams, students will apply knowledge of change management principles along with various performance improvement methods (e.g., LEAN, Six Sigma, and Appreciative Inquiry) to address the issues/problems at hand. Students will gain insight into team dynamics and the emerging role of health informatics professionals in solving informatics challenges and in managing change. They will also gain experience in critically evaluating the work of others. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-714. Advanced Health Information Technology. This course provides the students with an in-depth look at concepts in information technology as applied to health care. Topics include electronic medical records, knowledge-based systems, systems integration, nutrition informatics, consumer-facing health technologies, smartphone-based public health information systems, health social media, health sensors, human-computer interfaces, decision theory and decision support, digital libraries, and educational applications. Students will also be exposed to advanced topics in the information technology and health informatics literature. Faculty engaged in health informatics research will also share current research in which they are engaged. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-716. Ethical, Legal, and Regulatory Issues in. This course introduces students to the ethical, legal and regulatory issues relevant to the use of information technology in health care. Key topics include protecting patient confidentiality and securing health information; HIPAA privacy and security regulations; legal medical record; licensure and accreditation standards; health information exchange; preventing and managing breaches; cyber-security; business continuity and disaster planning; managing contracts with business associates. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-718. Capstone Project. Students will complete a practicum in a health care facility or an approved capstone project. The practicum will provide the student with hands on experience in participating in some aspect of a health IT project. Students are expected to enhance their knowledge and skills in areas such as project management, workflow analysis, system evaluation and system optimization, and data analytics. Students are expected to apply and synthesize concepts presented throughout the curriculum. 3 s.h.

 

HIN-780. Thesis Option. Students who are interested in conducting research in health informatics should choose the thesis option. The student will work with a faculty research advisor (and least two other committee members) in developing a research proposal with well-defined problem statement, hypothesis/research question, review of the literature, and methods. Student will present the proposal and conduct independent research study. Thesis requires final defense of research to a Thesis Committee. Thesis will span more than one semester. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-720. Independent Study in Health Services. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of health services as it relates to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-725. Independent Study in Functional Limitati. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of functional limitations as it relates to health and rehabilitation sciences.  1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-730. Independent Study in Pathology & Impairm. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of pathology and impairment as they related to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-735. Special Topics in Health Services. This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore a specialized area of interest in health services related to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-740. Special Topics in Functional Limitation. This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore a specialized area of interest in functional limitations related to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-745. Special Topics in Pathology & Impairment. Students will take part in a research laboratory.  This will allow students to become familiar with research activity in several laboratories at MUSC. These rotations will help students identify the laboratory in which they will perform their Dissertation research.  1-4 var. s.h.

 

HRS-800. Intro. to Translational Research. Students will critically evaluate the relevant literature to broaden their perspective on translational research and funding opportunities. Invited guest speakers, MUSC faculty, postdoctoral fellows and students will present recently published papers and develop research proposals related to translational research. 3 s.h

 

HRS-801. Applied Research. This course provides students in the Doctorate of Health Administration program and the PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Science with an introduction to qualitative and survey research methodologies that are used in health service/health care research and program evaluation.  The course uses recently published health services research papers teach students the key elements of study designs and data analysis, group discussion to enhance students' critical thinking skills in evaluating published research studies, and the content of the papers to teach current issues in health services research. The course assignments enable each student to begin developing skills in identifying research topics in their area of interest. Assignments include identifying a qualitative or survey research problem, choosing design features, describing study strengths and weaknesses and writing a plan for data collection and analysis. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-802. Comparative Effectiveness Research. The Congressional Budget Office (2007) defined CER as: rigorous evaluation of the impact of different options that are available for treating a given medical condition for a particular set of patients (CBO, 2007 p.3). A recent Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2009) list of CER topics for priority funding identify 4 types of designs: 1) Systematic Review; 2) Decision analysis models; 3) Observational Study; and 4) Large Pragmatic Clinical Trials. This course will introduce students to the concepts and methods of CER and provide an understanding of how CER may contribute to improvements in health care. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-805. Evidence-Based Practice for Research. In HRS 805, students preparing for a research career will gain an understanding of the facilitators and barriers to applying research evidence to clinical and health practice.  Students will be exposed to the article critique and peer review process to allow them to examine the current literature that provides the foundation for evidence-based clinical practices.  Students will learn about research synthesis publications and how to contribute to them in their fields.

 

HRS-810. Health and Rehabilitation Models. In HRS 810, students will explore and critically review models of health and rehabilitation science.  Students will learn how to develop conceptual models and use these models as a foundation for research questions. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-811. Fundamentals of Grant Writing. The main objective of this seminar course is to train students to develop a research idea in their area of interest and transform it into a complete NIH R21 grant application.  The R21 application is unique in that it affords the opportunity to conduct a high risk study as long as it has a corresponding high reward potential.  The course will be administered by the primary instructor but will take advantage of the unique knowledge base and skill sets of a few invited guest speakers (MUSC faculty and/or postdoctoral fellows). 3 s.h.

 

HRS-812. Seminar on Health Services Research. A health services research (HSR) covering the evolution of HSR over the last 40 years.  Students will review the original studies that effected the major paradigm shifts that HSR has undergone since the 1970s.  Students will discuss classical health services models and design approaches and critically analyze contemporary HSR studies, in view of the models, designs and methods used in the classical studies. 1 s.h.

 

HRS-814. Basic Academic Teaching Skills. This course provides an overview of the principles of adult learning; instructional design, instructional methods, skills, media, and evaluation; and instructional technology for use in health and rehabilitation sciences.  Emphasis will be on the design, delivery, and evaluation of selected units of instruction.  Under guided conditions, graduate students will hone teaching skills for use in a wide variety of contexts. 2 s.h.

 

HRS-815. Hlth & Rehab Sci Lab Rotation. Through rotations through applied laboratories, students will be expoosed to diverse research arenas, scientific approaches, technologies and experiences. 1-6 var. s.h

 

HRS-819. Teaching Practicum in Hlth & Rehab Sci. Under faculty supervision, students will engage in teaching-learning contexts that allow for the application of instructional design, delivery, and evaluation principles, and further hone their teaching skills to meet the needs of a variety of learners: students, peers, patients, and community members. Prerequisite: HRS-814  1-4 s.h. (variable)

 

HRS-820. Statistical Methods for Rehabilitation. This course provides a working knowledge of approaches to the analysis of archival data in rehabilitation research. The course is intended for PhD students in the College of Health Professions, but would also be of interest to graduate students in other professional programs. Topics include 1) data set and variable description; 2) issues of ascertainment bias associated with retrospective data; 3) criteria for the selection of descriptive statistics; 4) visual presentation of parameters; 4) formulation of hypotheses appropriate for the data; 5) multivariable analysis for continuous dependent variables; 6) log transformation; 7) logistic regression; 8) Kaplan Meier curves; 9) controls for selection bias; 10) use of factor and cluster analysis for data reduction; 11) interpretation of outputs from SAS and SPSS statistical software; 12) presentation and discussion of results. Students will use SAS or SPSS software to perform analyses of observational data to answer rehabilitation questions and interpret results in terms of both clinical and statistical conclusions. Minimum pre-requisites include basic statistics preparation and a minimum of 6 hours completed in the doctoral curriculum, or permission of the instructor. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-825. Human Anatomy for Doctoral Students. Human Anatomy provides students with a detailed examination of all structural aspects of all regions of the human body.  Doctoral students will have opportunity for special emphasis on regions and systems that relate to their researach interests through papers or projects as agreed upon between student, content advisor and Dr. Thomas. 6 s.h.

 

HRS-830. Introduction to Biostatistics. This course is designed to give students the skills to use data sets and conduct quantitative analysis to address research questions.  The course will use actual public-use secondary data sets, as well as small experimental rehabilitation data to provide students experience with data management and applied statistical analysis of real data.  The course will also provide presentation of introductory level statistical principles and methods most commonly used in research. 3 s.h.

 

HRS-830L. Introduction to Biostatistics Lab. The course will prepare students in the use of SAS and/or SPSS statistical analysis software.  This course is designed to give students the skills to use data sets and conduct quantitative analysis to address research questions.  The course will use actual public-sue secondary data sets, as well as small experimental rehabilitation data to provide students experience with data management and applied statistical analysis of real data. 2 s.h.

 

HRS-990. Dissertation Course. Dissertation work includes original investigation that gives evidence of mature scholarship and critical judgment, indicates knowledge of research methods and techniques, and demonstrates the ability to carry out independent investigation. Preparation of the dissertation may comply with the regulations contained in A Guide to the Preparation of Theses and Dissertations, which is available in the Graduate Office or through the College of Graduate Studies website. 1-12 s.h.

 

OT-510. Professional Issues in OT. This course increases awareness of professional issues within the field of occupational therapy. Topics such as professional accountability, professional liability, and continuing competence are examined. Students develop skills to enhance lifelong learning, and advocate for their own professional development, the development of the profession, and for those who are unable to meet their own occupational needs in society. 2 S.H. lecture.  Mitcham  Required Pre-requisites: All previous course work from Semesters 1-4

 

OT-520. Clin Correlate (Psychosocial Pract). This course provides guided observation and participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process. The format includes discussion and participation in clinical fieldwork experience. Students observe and participate in occupational therapy evaluation and intervention of individuals with psychiatric disorders, developmental delay, and mental retardation, and apply concepts from various psychosocial frames of reference. 1 S.H. Carson Required Pre-requisites: OT 604, OT 604L 

 

OT-522. OT Clinical Correlate ( Pediatrics). This course provides guided observation and selected participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process during a full-time, one-week Level I fieldwork experience with emphasis in pediatrics. Students observe and participate in evaluation and treatment of pediatric clients with a variety of diagnoses and conditions that are served in medical or educational settings and apply concepts from previous and concurrent courses emphasizing pediatric diagnoses, intervention and occupational performance. 1 S.H. Burik  Required Pre-requisites: OT 601, OT 601L, OT 659

 

OT-530L. OT for Neuro Cond I Lab. This course provides active involvement with clients with acute and chronic disabling conditions of neurological origin. Students will practice neurorehabilitation evaluations and apply these skills to the evaluation of clients with neurological movement impairment. Students learn other neurorehabilitation skills such as wheelchair mobility, transfers, and facilitation of movement skills for occupational performance. Students perform a synthesis of motor rehabilitation literature and apply research-based evidence to the clinical reasoning process, specifically with regards to choosing and formulating intervention for these clients. Through hands-on involvement with clients and dynamic interactive discussions/debates, students experience first-hand the application of conceptual motor rehabilitation frameworks to the occupational therapy process. 1 S.H. lab.  Faculty Required Pre-requisites: RS 701, OT 646, OT 646L

 

OT-530. OT for Neuro Cond I. This course promotes entry-level occupational therapy skills in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with movement dysfunction resulting from acquired neurological disorders. Specific emphasis is placed upon the relationship between occupational performance dysfunction and motor performance skill deficits. Students integrate motor control and motor learning conceptual practice models with occupational performance frameworks as a basis for evaluation and treatment planning. Through in-depth and extensive exploration of motor control mechanisms and theories of activity-dependent plasticity, students develop an understanding of the role of an occupational therapist in motor rehabilitation. 2 S.H. lecture.  Faculty  Required Pre-requisites: RS 701, OT 646, OT 646L

 

OT-545L. Surface Anatomy Lab. This lab course provides students with the knowledge of clinical surface anatomy necessary to practice in the field of occupational therapy.  Students will review and palpate bony landmarks, soft tissue structures, and muscles in the upper and lower extremity, head, neck, back, thorax, and abdomen. 1 s.h.

 

OT-561. Res/Scholarship Exp in Occ Ther I. This course is a continuation of Research/Scholarship Experience in occupational Therapy I.   It provides an opportunity for students to work in small groups under the direction of the faculty member and engage in research or scholarship activities related to occupational therapy. 1 s.h.

 

OT-562. Res/Scholarship Exp in Occup Therapy II. This course is a continuation of the Research/Scholarship Experience in Occupational Therapy I.  It provides an opportunity for students to work in small groups under the direction of a faculty member and engage in research or scholarship activities related to occupational therapy. 2 s.h.

 

OT-601. Occupational Performance in Pediatrics I. This course examines the major sensorimotor, cognitive, neuromotor, and psychosocial theories of normal development from childhood to early adulthood from an occupational therapy perspective.  The etiology and clinical features of common infant and childhood diseases / disorders are discussed with emphasis on neurological and biomechanical conditions. Students are introduced to common occupational therapy assessments and treatment approaches used to evaluate the development of infants and children in the following areas: visual perceptual, fine motor, self-help, oral motor / feeding, and neuromotor.  Clinical decision making and treatment in a variety of therapeutic settings will be discussed. 3 S.H. lecture. Coker Required Pre-requisites: RS 716, OT 545

 

OT-601L. Occupational Performance in PEDS I Lab. Small group sessions are used to apply principles and ideas presented in Occupational Performance in Pediatrics I lecture.  Emphasis is placed on participating in completing occupational therapy pediatric assessments, developing treatment activities, goal setting, and documentation for the infants and children with neuromuscular conditions. 1 S.H. lab. Coker Required Pre-requisites: RS 716, OT 545

 

OT-602. Occupational Performance in Peds II. This course is a continuation of material from Occupational Performance in Pediatrics I. Emphasis is placed on the etiology and clinical features of common infant and childhood diseases / disorders with emphasis on cognitive and sensory processing disorders. Students are introduced to common occupational therapy assessments and treatment approaches used to evaluate infants and children with cognitive delays and sensory processing deficits in the following areas: visual perceptual, fine motor, self-help, oral motor, and sensory processing.  Clinical decision making, treatment, and documentation in a variety of therapeutic settings are discussed. 3 S.H. lecture. Coker Required Pre-requisites: OT 601, OT 601L 

 

OT-602L. Occupational Performance in Peds II Lab. Small group sessions are used to apply principles and ideas presented in Occupational Performance in Pediatrics II lecture. Emphasis is placed on completing occupational therapy pediatric assessments, developing treatment activities, goal setting, and documentation for the infants and children with cognitive or sensory processing disorders. 2 S.H. lab. Coker Required Pre-requisites: OT 601, OT 601L

 

OT-603. Occupational Performance in Geriatrics. This course examines foundational, clinical, and behavioral sciences pertinent to the application of the occupational therapy processes of evaluation, intervention and outcomes for older adults. Students gain knowledge of the multiple issues surrounding occupational therapy practice with older adults including age-related changes, common diagnoses and conditions, ethical and legal issues impacting service delivery, and the influence of contextual factors on occupational performance. 2 S.H. lecture. Burik Required Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

 

OT-604. OT Performance/Psychosocial Practice I. This course provides an introduction to psychosocial occupational therapy.  Concepts of therapeutic use of self, interviewing techniques, communication skills, and group process dynamics, theory, and skills are examined and applied to psychosocial occupational therapy treatment. Psychosocial frames of reference and evaluation methods are introduced. 1 S.H. lecture. Carson Required Pre-requisites: OT 613

 

OT-604L. Ot Perform/Psychosocial Practice Lab I. . This course provides participation in lab activities designed to facilitate an understanding of therapeutic use of self, interviewing techniques, communication skills, and group process dynamics / skills with emphasis on the clinical relevance to psychosocial occupational therapy treatment. 1 S.H. lab. Carson Required Pre-requisites: OT 613

 

OT-606. Occup Perf: Neuro II. This course is the second of two courses designed to promote entry-level occupational therapy skills in the evaluation and treatment of clients with neurological conditions. Theories and principles or evaluation, treatment, and adaptation will be presented with specific emphasis on the relationship between occupational performance and cognitive frameworks as they relate to occupational therapy practice. 1 S.H. Required prerequisites: OT 530, OT 530L

 

OT-606L. Occup Perf: Neuro II Lab. This course promotes knowledge and acquisition of skills and attitudes necessary for the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework process of evaluation, intervention, and outcome as it relates to neurological conditions, specifically for clients who have survived a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and present with cognitive and/or perceptual dysfunction. 1 S.H. lab. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 530, OT 530L

 

OT-608. Occ Perf. Neuro Cond. III. This course is the third of three courses designed to promote entry-level occupational therapy skills in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with cognitive and perceptual dysfunction resulting from acquired neurological conditions.  Theories and principles of evaluation, treatment, and adaptation will be presented with specific emphasis on the relationship between occupational performance and cognitive frameworks as they relate to occupational therapy practice.  3 s.h.  Pre-requisites: OT 606, OT 606L

 

OT-608L. Occ. Perf. Neuro. Cond. III LAB. This course is the correlate lab to the lab to the Occupational Performance in Neurological Conditions III Lecture course.  The lab is designed to promote knowledge and acquisition of skills and attitudes necessary for the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework process of evaluation, intervention, and outcome as it relates to cognitive-perceptual dysfunction, specifically for clients who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI).  1 s.h. LAB Required Pre-requisites: OT 606, OT 606L

 

OT-612. Intro to Occup Science & Occup Therapy. This course provides an introduction to occupational science, the study of humans as occupational beings.  Further, the role of occupation as the philosophical underpinning of the profession of occupational therapy is explored, along with its history, development, and key organizations.  The course will also provide an overview of the theoretical foundations upon which the practice of contemporary occupational therapy is built.  Current status of and challenges for the profession are discussed across a variety of contexts - medical, educational and community.  Students begin to engage in the process of envisioning and developing their career trajectory.  2 S.H. lecture.  Required Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

 

OT-619. Pathophysiology. The purpose of this course is to acquaint rehabilitation science students with pathological changes in human function that lead to and are associated with various diseases. Understanding diseases and pathologically altered function forms an important component to evaluation, treatment, and the rehabilitation process. 3 S.H. lecture. Thomas  Required

 

OT-622. Synthesis and App. of Clin. Skills. This course fosters greater development of clinical reasoning through engagement in complex case studies, simulated experiences, and guided reflection. Students are encouraged to take a holistic approach in organizing, reviewing, and conceptualizing prior clinical coursework and to ultimately apply knowledge in multifaceted clinical scenarios. Requirements include successful completion of the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) Occupational Therapy Knowledge Exam (OTKE) and the comprehensive Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the transition from thinking like a student to thinking like a therapist in preparation for Level II fieldwork. 1 s.h.

 

OT-625. OT Clinical Correlate Physical Dysfunct. This course provides guided observation and participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process.  The format includes discussion and participation in a full-time, one-week Level I clinical fieldwork experience with emphasis in physical dysfunction. Students observe and participate in the evaluation and intervention of clients with a variety of diagnoses and conditions that are served in medical and/or community-based settings while applying concepts from the biomechanical, neurodevelopmental, and rehabilitative frames of reference. 1 S.H. Burik Required Pre-requisites: OT 606, OT 606L 

 

OT-627. Clinical Anatomy of the Upper Limb. The course will allow you to study and learn the anatomy of the upper limb, using videotaped presentations, computer applications, group meetings, and clinical applications.  Each student enrolled is assumed to be an independent learner who is motivated strictly by his/her own interest in anatomy.  Consequently, in order for the offering to be successful, all students will have to complete all assignments in an attentive fashion, as well as be present for group meetings. It is expected that everyone will participate to the fullest and give a significant contribution to his/her group activities. 1 S.H. lecture.  Bowman & Thomas Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

 

OT-636. Advanced Treatment Techniques. . Presents an opportunity for students to study new and/or specialized treatment techniques in a particular area of practice.  Practical experiences in using the selected treatment techniques are included. 1-3 S.H. Faculty 

 

OT-637. Special Topics in OT     . This course allows students to expand knowledge and skills in an area of special interest. 1-3 S.H. Faculty

 

OT-638. Occ Performance Psychosocial Pract II. This course explores methods of evaluation, program planning, and treatment implementation for psychosocial occupational therapy. A discussion of psychosocial issues of clients and caregivers as a vital aspect of health care is included. 2 S.H. lecture. Carson Required Pre-requisites: OT 604, OT 604L

 

OT-639. Delivery & Management of OT. The evolution of an increasingly complex health care environment makes it essential for occupational therapy students to understand contemporary service delivery and management practices.  This course provides an overview of healthcare systems, educational systems, and community systems in which occupational therapists practice. This course introduces students to current concepts and principles of management including reimbursement issues, laws pertinent to employment, and human resource issues.  Principles of program development and components of effective grant writing are explored and applied. 3 S.H. lecture. Carson Required Pre-requisites: All previous course work from Semesters 1-4

 

OT-640. Clinical Practicum I. This course is the first in a series of three Level II, full-time fieldwork experiences intended to emphasize the application of an academically acquired body of knowledge by providing the student with an in-depth experience in performance of the occupational therapy process.  Under supervision, the student will evaluate and treat clients across the life span reflecting diversity of diagnosis and culture. 12 S.H. Burik  Required Pre-requisites: Completion of all didactic coursework and Level 1 fieldwork

 

OT-641. Clinical Practicum II. This course is the second in a series of three Level II, full-time fieldwork experiences intended to emphasize the application of an academically acquired body of knowledge by providing the student with an in-depth experience in performance of the occupational therapy process.  Under supervision, the student will evaluate and treat clients across the life span reflecting diversity of diagnosis and culture. 12 S.H. Burik  Required Pre-requisites: OT 640

 

OT-644. Occ Perform Musculoskeletal Cond I. This course provides students with a solid foundation in the evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders using the biomechanical and rehabilitative frames of reference.  Included in this first segment are: 1) principles of evaluation, including interviewing skills, muscle testing, goniometry, dexterity and endurance 2) concepts and techniques related to physical intervention 3) application of activity analysis to functional daily living tasks 4) basic skills for transfers and adaptive equipment.  The science of biomechanics and kinesiology is presented in relation to acute and chronic orthopedic disorders along with case presentations to integrate clinical decision-making and problem solving. 4 S.H. lecture. Bowman Required Pre-requisites: RS 716, OT 545

 

OT-644L. Occ Perform Musculoskel Cond I Lab. This course provides the student with a solid foundation in the evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders to ensure the development of practical occupational therapy evaluation skills. Students study and practice assessment tests and measurement skills including occupational profile, initial interviewing skills, manual muscle testing, measurement of joint range of motion, vital sign assessments, dexterity, sensation testing, and neurological screening. Concepts and techniques related to therapeutic intervention and posture analysis are practiced and related to various common situations involving musculoskeletal dysfunction to provide problem-solving skills during laboratory sessions. 2 S.H. lab. Bowman Required Pre-requisites: RS 716, OT 545

 

OT-646. Occupational Perform/Musculoskel Con II. This course provides students with a solid foundation in evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. Included in this course are the continued exploration of evaluation and treatment of orthopedic disorders and the progression into more complicated conditions and advanced treatment techniques. Principles of occupational task adaptation, upper extremity evaluation and treatment, industrial rehabilitation, treatment modalities, and orthotic fabrication are presented. Student case presentations are used to build upon the skills acquired in the previous musculoskeletal course. Clinical problems are used to ensure the student is able to develop a treatment plan and home program for any given case. 4 S.H. lecture. Bowman Required Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

 

OT-646L. Occupational Perform for Musc Con II Lab. This course provides students with evaluation and treatment skills for musculoskeletal disorders. Included in this second segment are the continued exploration of evaluation and treatment methodology for orthopedic disorders, principles and application of modality use, occupational tasks, upper extremity evaluation and treatment, industrial rehabilitation, and adaptation, orthotic fabrication of static and dynamic splints and case study presentations to integrate advance occupational therapy evaluation and treatment skills. All activities are demonstrated and practiced to build on the practical skills during the first segment of the course. 2 S.H. lab. Bowman Required Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

 

OT-659. OT Clinical Correlate (Occupation). This course introduces students to the role of fieldwork in occupational therapy education and practice and provides students with opportunities to participate in non-traditional, community-based Level I fieldwork experiences. The course provides students with a foundation for acquiring and developing a repertoire of beginning professional behaviors while engaging in service learning with individuals and organizations in the community. 1 S.H.  Burik Required Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

 

OT-661. OT Clinical Correlate (geriatrics). This course provides guided observation and participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process during non-traditional, community-based Level I fieldwork experiences that emphasize wellness, enhancing quality of life, and engagement in occupation to support participation in context for older adults. Students interview and assess clients, participate in activity programming, plan and implement therapeutic groups based on clients146 needs and interests, and document the occupational therapy process while applying concepts from previous and concurrent coursework. 1 S.H. Burik Required Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L, OT 659 

 

OT-664. Instructional Processes. Opportunity for individuals and/or small group of students to actively participate with faculty members in innovative community-based experiences that will improve the health needs of diverse communities. Students will gain experience examining how their professional skills may be harnessed to respond to the health objectives embedded in Healthy People 2010. 3 s.h. Faculty.

 

OT-667. Evidenced Based Practice I.  This course introduces students to the concepts of evidence-based practice. Students will specifically learn the concepts of quantitative research by giving attention to basic principles underlying the process of clinical science, including concepts of the scientific methods related to experimental research. Three major aspects of the scientific method addressed will be: 1) reliability and validity, 2) research design and 3) data analysis. Students will be oriented to published rehabilitation literature and will learn how to search, read, and analyze literature that validates current occupational therapy practice. 2 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

 

OT-668. Evidence Based Practice II. This course introduces and provides preliminary experience with qualitative research approaches used to generate new knowledge in the rehabilitation sciences. Attention will be given to exploring the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative research methods, the principles of methodologic rigor, strategies for qualitative analysis, the importance of ethical research conduct, and to examining and critiquing existing professional evidence that may be used to inform practice. 1 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 667

 

OT-681. Independent Study in Occupational Therapy. Students study a topic related to OT under faculty supervision. 1-3 var. s.h. Faculty

 

OT-695. Community Based Practice. Opportunity for individuals and/or small group of students to actively participate with faculty members in innovative community-based experiences that will improve the health needs of diverse communities. Students will gain experience examining how their professional skills may be harnessed to respond to the health objectives embedded in Healthy People 2010. 1-3 s.h. Faculty.

 

OT-698. Professional Capstone Seminar. This course provides an intensive two-day seminar immediately following the completion of all three clinical practicums.  The seminar focuses on review of requisite skills for taking the national certification examination and readiness for entry into the practice environment. Attention is given to establishing a career trajectory, developing plans for continuing competence and ongoing professional contribution, and creating an effective balance between one146s personal and professional lives. 1 S.H. lecture. Faculty Required Pre-requisites: OT 642

 

OT-701. Neuroscience. This course will thoroughly examine the structure and function of the human nervous system with emphasis on functional considerations related to clinical practice.  It will include a study of microscopic and macroscopic anatomical components of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous system with emphasis on the organization of functional systems.  The neurophysiological principles which are related to neural transmission and function of the various pathological conditions affecting nervous system will be emphasized and students will be expected to correlate the clinical manifestations with the anatomic location of the pathology.  4 s.h.

 

OT-716. Human Anatomy. This course in gross anatomy provides students with the knowledge of clinical anatomy necessary to practice their expertise upon graduation. The contents of the course include gross anatomy and an introduction to anatomical radiology, and will be conducted to represent a survey of the entire human body.  Teaching/learning methodologies will include lectures and discussions, prosected human cadavers, and computer applications. The course will be taught regionally (i.e. upper limb, lower limb, spine, etc.), and will survey all morphologic systems.  4 S.H. lecture, 1 S.H. lab. Thomas  Required Pre-requisites: Admission to the program 

 

OT-800. Intro to Occupational Therapy. This course introduces students to the theoretical underpinnings of occupational therapy via an exploration of occupational science, the study of humans as occupational beings, and the occupational therapy conceptual practice models. The role of occupation as the philosophical foundation and central core of the profession is explored, along with its history, ethics, domain, process and key organizations. The current status of, and challenges for, the profession are discussed across a variety of contexts (medical, educational, and community), and for a variety of recipients (individuals, organizations, and populations). The overall goals of the course are to (1) encourage students to develop an occupational perspective and lens through which to view the world; (2) foster students' ability to situate themselves and their learning within the field as a whole; (3) engage students in the process of envisioning and developing their career trajectory; and (4) offer resources to support students' wellness along the academic journey.  3 s.h.

 

OT-802. Therapeutic Interactions. Concepts of therapeutic use of self are defined and discussed  including self-awareness of attributes and skills for effective  interpersonal interaction with clients and caregivers. Effective collaboration between the occupational therapist and occupational  therapist assistant and members of the health care team is  discussed. Principles of interviewing techniques and group  process  dynamics, theory, and skills are presented and discussed in the  context of occupational therapy practice.  1 s.h.

 

OTD-803. Therapeutic Interactions Lab. Concepts of therapeutic use of self are applied for effective interpersonal interaction with clients and caregivers. An opportunity to practice effective interviewing skills, interpersonal communication, OT/OTA collaboration, and effective group leadership and facilitation is provided both in the classroom and community setting.  1 s.h.

 

OTD-807. Surface Anatomy Lab. This course provides students with the knowledge of clinical surface anatomy necessary to practice in the field of occupational therapy. Students will review and palpate bony landmarks, soft tissue structures, and muscles in the upper and lower extremity, head, neck, back, thorax, and abdomen. Students are challenged to apply new knowledge by simulating the role of therapist during lab and practical exams. Students are also expected to demonstrate professional attitudes and use lay terminology during simulations in order to prepare for real patient interaction.  1 s.h.

 

PA-606. Human Anatomy. Human Anatomy is a broad, survey course that provides students with a detailed examination of all structural aspects of the human body. The course is presented by regions and allows students to learn and assimilate the morphology of different areas of the human body in an organized and logical fashion. Students are expected to become skilled at identification of anatomical structures, and are also expected to become proficient at recognition of structural arrangements and structural relationships. Anatomical structures are correlated with radiographic images in each of the regions studied. The course content is designed to correlate with important clinical problems that students may encounter as practitioners, and students are encouraged to start acquainting themselves with ways that anatomical alterations can affect normal function. The course is taught via lectures, class discussions, and laboratory dissection/prosection of human cadavers. Students have the opportunity to further their knowledge of anatomy by using computer-assisted technology, which is available online. Prerequisite: Enrollment into the Physician Assistant Program. 6 s.h.Summer.

 

PA-607. Intro to the PA Profession. This seminar course is designed specifically for the PA student covering the following topic areas: the healthcare delivery system and the PA role and legal standing in US health care, federal programs and initiatives in health care delivery, payment mechanisms and reimbursement policies, federal health care policy as well as risk management and quality assurance. Collaboration with other health care providers in the team approach to patient care will be emphasized. A critical review of selected readings will be required for classroom discussions. Prerequisite:  Enrollment into the Physician Assistant Program. 1 s.h. Summer

 

PA-614. Fundamentals of Clin Med I. The Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine (FCM) course series introduces the study of the disease process. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the essential anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medical terminology relevant to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. The differential diagnosis of symptoms and physical findings along with interpretation of laboratory and radiographic tests appropriate to each system are discussed. Topics include dermatology, EENT, endocrinology, hematology and cardiology. 6 s.h.

 

PA-615. Fundamentals of Clin Med II. This course continues the introduction to the study of the disease process. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the essential anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medical terminology relevant to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. The differential diagnosis of symptoms and physical findings along with interpretation of laboratory and radiographic tests appropriate to each system is discussed. Topics include respiratory, musculoskeletal, genitourinary, renal, women's health and gastrointestinal diseases. 6 s.h.

 

PA-616. Fundamentals of Clin Med III. This course continues the introduction to the study of the disease process. Emphasis is placed on the integration of the essential anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medical terminology relevant to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. The differential diagnosis of symptoms and physical findings along with interpretation of laboratory and radiographic tests appropriate to each system is discussed. Topics include neurology, psychiatry and infectious disease. 3 s.h.

 

PA-617. Clinical Problem Solving I. Clinical Problem Solving will consolidate the topics of medicine by developing a logical methodology of assessment of disease processes or syndromes, and subsequent intervention. Students will master the ability to generate differential diagnoses specific to the patients' presenting complaints, signs and symptoms and laboratory data.  A problem-based learning format is used. Prerequisites:  Human Anatomy, Clinical Laboratory Medicine.  1 s.h. Fall.

 

PA-618. Clinical Problem Solving II. Clinical Problem Solving II is a continuation of Clinical Problem Solving I. Prerequisites: Clinical Problem Solving I, Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine I, Physical Diagnosis. 1 s.h. Spring.

 

PA-619. Clinical Problem Solving III. Clinical Problem Solving III is a continuation of Clinical Problem Solving II. Prerequisites: Clinical Problem Solving II, Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine II. 1 s.h. Summer.

 

PA-624. Pharmacotherapeutics I. This course teaches the fundamental principles of pharmacotherapy by presenting the rational for treatments as well as the recommended treatment plans for a specific category of disease processes, symptoms and conditions in sequence with body system topics of PA614 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine I.  Students learn to individualize medication regimens based on drug attributes, clinical evidence, comorbidities, drug mechanism of action, drug safety, monitoring parameters and treatment cost.  Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. Prerequisite: Principles of Pharmacology 3 s.h. Fall

 

PA-625. Pharmacotherapeutics II. This course is a continuation of PA 624 and teaches pharmacotherapy by presenting the rational for treatments as well as the recommended treatment plans for a specific range of disease processes, symptoms and conditions in sequence with body system topics within PA 615 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine II.  Students will continue to learn how to individualize medication regimens based on drug attributes, clinical evidence, comorbidities, drug mechanism of action, drug safety, monitoring parameters and treatment cost. Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. Prerequisite: Pharmacotherapeutics I 3 s.h. Spring.

 

PA-626. Pharmacotherapeutics III. This course is a continuation of PA 625 and teaches pharmacotherapy by presenting the rational for treatments as well as the recommended treatment plans for a specific range of disease processes, symptoms and conditions in sequence with body system topics within PA 616 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine III.  Students will continue to learn how to individualize medication regimens based on drug attributes, clinical evidence, comorbidities, drug mechanism of action, drug safety, monitoring parameters and treatment cost. Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. Prerequisite: Pharmacotherapeutics II  2 s.h. Summer.

 

PA-630. Bioethics. This course introduces key concepts related to  medical law, ethics and bioethics and uses a case  based approach to explore the central moral,  philosophical, and social problems in health  care. Students reflect on the relationships among  moral, professional and legal obligations of  physician assistants, including those involving  honesty, and respect for patient well-being,  autonomy, dignity and confidentiality. 1 s.h.

 

PA-632. Principles of Pharmacology. This course introduces the pharmacologic principles and concepts which are paramount to making sound pharmacotherapeutic decisions. The course explores how medications are delivered to the body, how they are eliminated from the body and how they work in the body. Key concepts include mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug targets, pharmaceutical math, drug toxicity and drug interactions. Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. There will also be a review of microbiology to refamiliarize students with common, clinically relevant organisms that cause disease as well as an introduction to antibiotics. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Physician Assistant Program 2 s.h. Summer.

 

PA-633. International Physician Assistant. This course is designed to expose the student to  PA practice in other nations, with a focus on  investigating the similarities and differences  between practice in the United States and other  nations. Students will interact with PA students  from the host program(s), participate in PA  education in the host system, and explore aspects of the health care system in the country  selected for study. 1 s.h.

 

PA-634. History & Physical Examination Skills. This course focuses on the clinical knowledge and skills necessary for the physician assistant in primary care practice to perform a thorough assessment of a patient using a body-system approach. Students will rely on knowledge of anatomy and physiology in clinical and simulated patient experiences with emphasis on therapeutic communication, medical history, and physical examination. 2 s.h.

 

PA-636. Clinical Skills and Procedures. This course builds clinical skills needed to negotiate the clinical year successfully. Skills to be learned this semester will be multiple and include: surgical knot-tying, suturing, orthopedic splinting, passage of NG tubes, cerumen and foreign body removal from ear and nose, operating room procedures, lumbar puncture, arthrocentesis, diagnostic ultrasound, I & D of abscesses, treatment of ingrown toenails, subungual hematoma evacuation, cryosurgery, IV line placement, local and topical anesthesia techniques, peripheral nerve blocks, removal of corneal and conjunctival foreign body, tonometry, nasal packing, ABG collection, bladder catheterization, pulmonary function testing, treatment of Bartholin's cyst/abscess, pap smear screening, inguinal hernia reduction, STD screening, treatment of nursemaid's elbow, IM, SQ and intradermal injections and pre-school children oral health assessment and fluoride varnish application. You will do physical exams on hospitalized patients with internal medicine resident supervision and critique/instruction. You will all participate in an OR experience. Prerequisite: History and Physical Examination Skills.  2 s.h.

 

PA-641. Student Personal Wellness. This elective course is open to physician assistant students with an interest in personal wellness and developing a better work-life balance.  Students enrolled in this course will learn the PATIENCE (Physician Assistant (student) Training (for) Introspection, rElaxation, aNd Career Endurance) Curriculum, which was developed for this course. The Elective will be mainly web-based, with occasional in-person meetings.  It will incorporate principles of work-life balance such as introspection and relaxation to help promote career longevity and avoidance of early burnout.   Assignments will include a choice of reading assignments, personal/self-reflections, journaling, and activities such as meditation to promote an improved sense of personal wellness and work-life balance.  A majority of the assignments will be submitted via online modalities.  Furthermore, attention on reducing work stress, encouraging personal health, improving sleep hygiene, and decreasing dependence on electronics will be incorporated.  This elective will provide a unique experience that students would not ordinarily be exposed to in other classes within the physician assistant student curriculum.  Prerequisite: Admission into the PA program.  1 s.h.

 

PA-643. Human Physio & Basic Pathophysio Concept. This course provides an in depth discussion of normal human physiology which builds upon prerequisite coursework. Course topics, where applicable, will be integrated with PA 606 - Human Anatomy. In addition,the following basic pathophysiologic concepts will be discussed in preparation for the subsequent integrated medicine and pathophysiology curricula. 3 s.h. Summer.

 

PA-646. Pediatrics. This course provides students with a fundamental knowledge base regarding General Pediatrics.  The student will be able to later apply this knowledge clinically in the evaluation and treatment of newborns, infants, children, and adolescents. Prerequisites:  Progression to the second summer didactic semester 1 S.H.

 

PA-651. Geriatrics. This course provides the student with a broad overview of challenges unique to caring for our aging population. The purpose of the course is to facilitate students' ability to perform quality geriatric patient care and to foster collaboration of the students with other professionals working in geriatrics by fieldwork at interdisciplinary geriatric settings.  Co-requisites:  Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine III. 1 s.h. Summer.

 

PA-652. Principles of Emergency Medicine. The course introduces the fundamental principles  of emergency medicine practice. Initial,  life-saving and stabilizing interventions for the  critically ill and seriously injured as well as  common presenting conditions to the emergency  department are presented. Students will also be  certified in Basic and Advanced Life Support. 2 s.h.

 

PA-653. Principles of Surgical Care. This course introduces surgical care and techniques. Topics covered include wound healing, pre- and post-operative management and specifics of surgical management of body systems. 2 s.h.

 

PA-654. Diagnostic Medicine I. This course provides instruction in basic and applied laboratory and radiologic studies.  The topics will align with the module topics of PA 614 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine I.  Prerequisites:  co-enrollment in PA 614 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine I  2 S.H.

 

PA-655. Diagnostic Medicine II. This course is a continuation of Diagnostic Medicine I and provides instruction in basic and applied laboratory and radiologic studies.  The topics will align with the module topics of PA 615 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine II and PA 616 Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine III.  Prerequisites:  PA XXX Diagnostic Medicine I.  2 S.H.

 

PA-662. Pathophysiology I. This course reviews the basic physiologic regulatory mechanisms responsible for maintenance of homeostasis in the normal human and introduces the pathophysiologic alterations which occur in these mechanisms leading to specific disease processes. It also presents a molecular and genetic basic of disease, and it provides clinical correlations which support concurrent coursework involving the treatment of disease. Understanding the mechanisms of disease is essential in the role of the physician assistant. Prerequisites: None. 3 s.h. Fall.

 

PA-663. Pathophysiology II. This course will build on the knowledge gained in PA-660, reviewing the basic physiologic regulatory mechanisms responsible for maintenance of homeostasis in the normal human and introduces the pathophysiologic alterations which occur in these mechanisms leading to specific disease processes. It focuses on organ systems including respiratory, circulatory, renal, GI and endocrine, providing clinical correlations which support concurrent coursework involving the treatment of disease. Prerequisites: PA-660. 3  s.h. Spring.

 

PA-670. Clinical Rotation I. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-672. Clinical Rotation II. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-674. Clinical Rotation III. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-676. Clinical Rotation IV. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-678. Clinical Rotation V. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-679. Clinical Rotation VI. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-680. Clinical Rotation VII. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-682. Clinical Rotation VIII. Eight supervised, five-week clinical courses provide students with hands-on clinical experience and evaluation into the medical and surgical care for pediatric and adult patients.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings. The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-685. Clinical Rotation Elective. This elective clerkship experience is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to have additional hands-on clinical experience in any of the eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery and long term care, or to gain experience in any specialty or subspecialty of medicine of their choice.  Students are actively engaged in the delivery of care in inpatient, outpatient and long term care settings.  The clerkship experiences offer training in eight distinct disciplines, which are family medicine, general internal medicine, pediatrics, women's health (includes obstetrics and gynecology), mental health, emergency medicine, general surgery, and long term care.  The students evaluate medical and surgical patients and follow their daily progress; thereby developing the ability to elicit history and physical findings, correlate those findings along with the patients' physiologic and biochemical data and emotional state in order to formulate a plan for patient management.  This ability to analyze, synthesize and make decisions is fundamental to the clinical clerkship experience.  Students are also given opportunities to develop skills and demonstrate competency in performing and interpreting certain medical procedures and tasks.  Attendance at rounds, and an orientation to the intensive care unit, grand rounds and medical conferences may be required of students.  In certain settings, there are opportunities to work with a variety of house staff or related health professionals to gain a broader understanding of interdisciplinary health delivery and use of medical technologies. Students also receive instruction and evaluation in professional competencies including relating to colleagues, communicating with patients, understanding the PA role and limitations, self confidence, reliability, dependability, attitude and appearance. 5 s.h.

 

PA-690. Graduate Project I. This three-credit course sequence will be scheduled during the clinical year of the program. The outcome for the graduate project is for the student to develop a physician assistant practice oriented project wherein he/she employs the principles of evidence-based practice by integrating current published medical research. In consultation with a faculty member the student will develop a clinically relevant question and/or community project. The student will be required to present his/her graduate project to the faculty and the PA program and the College of Health Professions community at the conclusion of the course.  1 s.h.

 

PA-691. Graduate Project II. This three-credit course sequence will be scheduled during the clinical year of the program. The outcome for the graduate project is for the student to develop a physician assistant practice oriented project wherein he/she employs the principles of evidence-based practice by integrating current published medical research. In consultation with a faculty member the student will develop a clinically relevant question and/or community project. The student will be required to present his/her graduate project to the faculty and the PA program and the College of Health Professions community at the conclusion of the course.  1 s.h.

 

PA-695. Research Methods for Hlth Professions. This course will introduce the Physician Assistant student to the research process as informed consumers and potential future participants in research. Topics covered include the characteristics of a research study, methods of control in experimental research, internal and external validity, experimental research designs, evaluation of research, statistics and test construction. Also addressed are scientific writing, strategies for conducting literature searches, research ethics and elements of a research proposal. 3.s.h, Fall. 

 

PT-695. Community Based Practice. This course provides an opportunity for individuals and/or small group of students to actively participate with faculty members or community preceptors in innovative community-based experiences that will improve the health needs of diverse communities.  Students will gain experience examining how their professional skills may be harnessed to respond to the health objectives embedded in Healthy People 2020.   1-3 var. s. h.

 

PT-700. Foundations of Physical Therapy. This course introduces the student to the history, development, and current issues of the physical therapy profession and the American Physical Therapy Association. The Code of Ethics and Core Values of Professionalism will be presented and discussed.  Legal and regulatory issues related to the physical therapy profession will be examined. Professional communication, intercultural communication, and cultural competence will be discussed in the context of patient/client and professional relations. The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) framework for patient/client management will be introduced.  2 s.h.

 

PT-701. Neuroscience. This course will thoroughly examine the structure and function of the human nervous system with emphasis on functional considerations related to clinical practice.  It will include a study of microscopic and macroscopic anatomical components of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous system with emphasis on the organization of functional systems.  The neurophysiological principles which are related to neural transmission and function of the various pathological conditions affecting nervous system will be emphasized and students will be expected to correlate the clinical manifestations with the anatomic location of the pathology. 4 S.H.

 

PT-705. Movement Science. Movement Science involves the study of human biomechanics and kinesiology based on an in-depth knowledge of applied human anatomy. Students begin with the study of general biomechanics (including Newton's laws, free body diagrams, and computation of vector quantities) and tissue mechanics (including the response of musculoskeletal tissues of interest under different loading conditions). The course then moves on an in-depth study of applied human anatomy and kinesiology by body region with emphasis on normal, gross form and function as it relates to the practice of Physical Therapy. 3 s.h.

 

PT-705L. Surface Anatomy Lab. The purpose of this laboratory course is to provide students the opportunity to develop palpation skills and to appreciate the differences of a variety of tissue types while learning clinical surface anatomy. The course uses a regional approach and is designed to correlate with the Human Anatomy course.  1 S.H.

 

PT-710. Adult Development & Aging. This course will examine foundational, clinical, and behavioral sciences pertinent to the examination, evaluation, and planning of treatment interventions for adults across the lifespan. We will focus on how to modify physical therapy examinations and interventions based on changes that occur in the body over time. The impact of ethical, legal and psychosocial issues affecting adults will also be presented.  3 s.h.

 

PT-711. Clinical Pathophysiology. Clinical Pathophysiology presents an in depth view of the pathogenesis of common disease processes and conditions. Included in the presentations and discussions are demonstrations of the progression of each pathologic condition at the cellular level and signs and symptoms at the macro level. The course content reflects the effects of pathologic processes on an individual's functional abilities and limitations, along with the relationship between disease related impairment and functional limitations as the key focus. Disease etiology along with prognosis are also presented in detail and the ICF model is used as an expert consensus document for the basic framework of the course content. Pathologic processes and conditions discussed include cellular injury and inflammation; tissue healing; immunology and diseases of the immune system; and neoplasia. Also discussed are infectious, cardiopulmonary, collagen vascular, hepatic, gastrointestinal, renal and endocrine diseases. 3 s.h.

 

PT-712. Applied Physiology and Nutrition. This course is designed to provide the student with a firm understanding of both the acute and chronic adaptations that occur in the human body in response to physical activity/exercise. An emphasis is placed on metabolic, cardiorespiratory, and musculoskeletal adaptations to exercise. Students will learn to administer and interpret a variety of tests and measurements used to assess fitness/athletic performance, and to develop sound exercise prescriptions based on the results of these tests.  The role of nutrition in optimizing health and performance will also be addressed.  This course will also help prepare interested students for the National Strength and Conditioning Association's Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) examination. 3 s.h.

 

PT-712L. Applied Physiology and Nutrition Lab. This laboratory course includes demonstration and practice of various testing and training methods available to physical therapists for assessing and improving the fitness of their clients in the five major fitness component areas:  cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. In addition, there will be lab time devoted to nutritional assessment concepts/techniques. 1 s.h.

 

PT-716. Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement. This course utilizes a format of lecture, laboratory experience, and case-based learning to prepare the student to use observational gait analysis techniques to identify specific gait abnormalities, the causes for these deviations, and propose treatment options for optimizing functional gait. 1.5 s.h.

 

PT-717. Differential Diagnosis. This course takes a systems approach in differential screening, interpretation of results, and differentiating dysfunction within the scope of physical therapist practice from those that indicate a referral to other health care practitioners. 2 S.H.

 

PT-718. Human Anatomy. This course in gross anatomy is designed to provide students with the knowledge of clinical anatomy necessary to practice their expertise upon graduation. The contents of the course include gross anatomy and an introduction to anatomical radiology, and is conducted to represent a survey of the entire human body. Teaching/learning methodologies include lectures and discussions, prosected human cadavers, and computer applications. The course is taught regionally (i.e. upper limb, lower limb, spine, etc.), and surveys all morphologic systems. 4 S.H. lecture, 1 S.H. lab. Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

 

PT-724. Therapeutic Exercise. This course provides an introduction to the theory, scientific principles, and evidence for the use of various types of exercise employed by physical therapists for the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of optimal health and physical function as well as the prevention of disease and movement dysfunction. Emphasis will also be placed on basic exercise techniques related to muscle performance (including strength, power, and endurance) and stretching/flexibility activities. The impact of environmental factors such as setting (acute care, home, gym setting, sports, aquatic, and industrial) and types of equipment (horse, balls, tubes, and bands) on exercise considerations is an important focus of this course. Case based instruction, evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning are emphasized throughout.  2 s.h.

 

PT-724L. Therapeutic Exercise & Massage. Laboratory sessions will provide instruction and experience in various modes of therapeutic exercise and massage. Emphasis will be placed on basic exercise techniques related to muscle performance (including strength, power, and endurance) and stretching/flexibility activities. The implementation of the Annual Check-Up By A Physical Therapist is an integral component of this course. Case based instruction, evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning are emphasized.   1.5 s.h.

 

PT-725L. Biophysical Agents. This course provides an introduction to the theory, scientific principles, and evidence for the use of various types of biophysical agents employed by physical therapists for the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of optimal health and physical function through both cognitive and psychomotor teaching methods. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the underlying indications for and practical application of a variety of modalities currently used in clinical practice. Laboratory sessions will provide instruction and experience in the application of biophysical agents for the management of pain, dysfunction, impaired muscle performance, range of motion limitations, and the delivery of medications. Emphasis will also be placed on safe and appropriate utilization of all physical agents for a variety of diagnoses and impairments. Case based instruction; evidence-based practice and clinical reasoning are emphasized.  1.5 s.h.

 

PT-727A. Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Pt A. This course will introduce students to common diseases/conditions involving the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and lymphatic systems, as well as the various types of interventions used to treat them.  There will be an emphasis on the role of the physical therapist in providing appropriate preventative and rehabilitative exercise programs and risk factor modification education for persons with, or at risk for cardiovascular, pulmonary, and/or lymphatic diseases/conditions 2 s.h.

 

PT-727B. Cardiovascular and Pulmonary PT B. This course will introduce students to common diseases/conditions involving the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and lymphatic systems, as well as the various types of interventions used to treat them.  There will be an emphasis on the role of the physical therapist in providing appropriate preventative and rehabilitative exercise programs and risk factor modification education for persons with, or at risk for cardiovascular, pulmonary, and/or lymphatic diseases/conditions. 1 s.h.

 

PT-727LA. Cardiovascular/Pulmon PT LabA. This laboratory course will assist student physical therapists in developing requisite entry-level cardiovascular, pulmonary, and lymphatic examination and treatment skills. Activities to be covered include: pulse palpation, blood pressure assessment, auscultation of heart and breath sounds, basic EKG interpretation, diagnostic and functional exercise testing, risk factor assessment, interpretation of lab values, bronchial hygiene, airway clearance techniques, and physical therapy treatment in the ICU setting. 1 s.h.

 

PT-727LB. Cardiovascular/Pulmon PT LabB. This laboratory course will assist student physical therapists in developing requisite entry-level cardiovascular, pulmonary, and lymphatic examination and treatment skills. Activities to be covered include: pulse palpation, blood pressure assessment, auscultation of heart and breath sounds, basic EKG interpretation, diagnostic and functional exercise testing, risk factor assessment, interpretation of lab values, bronchial hygiene, airway clearance techniques, and physical therapy treatment in the ICU setting. 1 s.h.

 

PT-728. Imaging/Electrophysiology for Physical T. This course reviews the foundations and principles of imaging and the use of imaging studies in physical therapy.  Case studies are used.  The course proceeds to cover the principles of the use of electrophysiologic studies with neuromuscular disease and injury. The role of the physical therapist specialist in electrophysiology, the process to become a clinical specialist, and the role of the non-specialist to make the appropriate referral are discussed.  Students enrolled in the course are required to attend a minimum of two imaging seminars that are conducted by the house staff of the MUSC Radiology Department.   2 S.H.

 

PT-730. Musculoskeletal I. Musculoskeletal I prepares students to be safe, proficient, and reflective physical therapy practitioners following the principles for evidence based practice regarding the examination, evaluation, diagnosis, establishing a prognosis and the treatment/management for the peripheral neurological and musculoskeletal systems related to post-surgical rehabilitation, injury, dysfunction, and/or medical problems.  The course focuses on the lower quarter. 3 s.h.

 

PT-730L. Musculoskeletal I Laboratory. This laboratory course provides students with the skill and practice to perform screening, examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, and intervention for lower quarter and associated areas of the musculoskeletal system. Emphasis is placed injuries, diseases, and factors that affect movement and function. Rehabilitation and therapeutic intervention techniques are practiced and integrated with previous learning experiences and case studies. 3 s.h.

 

PT-731. Musculoskeletal II. Musculoskeletal II is a 3 S.H. lecture 2 S.H. laboratory. Lecture: Musculoskeletal II is the second in a series of courses that prepares students to be safe, proficient, and reflective practitioners in examining and treating dysfunction and disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based practice, as well as current research and theory. Musculoskeletal II primarily addresses lower quarter problems and addresses the preferred practice patterns 4B-1 through 4J-1 from the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice.  Lab: The laboratory component of Musculoskeletal II provides detailed instruction and learning experiences focusing on the examination, evaluation and clinical management of individuals with lower quarter musculoskeletal problems and dysfunction. 3 s.h.

 

PT-731L. Musculoskeletal II Lab. This laboratory course provides students with the skill and practice to perform screening, examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, and intervention for upper quarter and associated areas of the musculoskeletal system. Emphasis is placed on injuries, diseases, and factors that affect movement and function. Rehabilitation and therapeutic intervention techniques are practiced and integrated with previous learning experiences and case studies. 2 s.h.

 

PT-732. Muscuskeletal III. Musculoskeletal III prepares students to be safe, proficient, and reflective physical therapy practitioners following the principles for evidence based practice regarding the examination, evaluation, diagnosis, establis.h.ing a prognosis and the treatment/management for the peripheral neurological and musculoskeletal systems related to post-surgical, injury, dysfunction, and/or medical problems.  The course focuses on the spine, pelvic girdle, and craniomandibular regions. 3 s.h.

 

PT-732L. Musculoskeletal III Lab. This laboratory course provides students with the skill and practice to perform screening, examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, and intervention for the spine and associated areas of the musculoskeletal system. Emphasis is placed on injuries, diseases, and factors that affect movement and function. Rehabilitation and therapeutic intervention techniques are practiced and integrated with previous learning experiences and case studies. 2 s.h.

 

PT-733. Prosthetics and Orthotics. This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to develop, integrate, and apply knowledge and skills necessary to examine and treat individuals with selected musculoskeletal impairments. Topics include management of clients needing spinal or foot orthoses and/or upper or lower limb prostheses. The laboratory sessions are designed to provide students with opportunities to apply examination and treatment techniques used in the management of such individuals. 1.5 s.h.

 

PT-740. Clinical Practicum I. (8 weeks) This is the student's first full-time onsite clinical learning experience supervised by a licensed physical therapist with a progression of learning opportunities, application techniques, and professional behavioral abilities. 8 s.h.

 

PT-741. Clinical Practicum II. (10 weeks)  Onsite clinical learning experience. 10 s.h.

 

PT-742. Clinical Practicum III. (10 weeks)  Onsite clinical learning experience. 10 s.h.

 

PT-743. Clinical Practicum IV. (12 weeks)  Onsite clinical learning experience.12 s.h.

 

PT-746. Health Promotion and Professionalism in. This course will focus on professional roles, responsibilities, and current issues affecting the physical therapy profession. It will emphasize the importance of community engagement to promote health and optimum wellness and prevent disease/secondary conditions associated with movement dysfunction. Students will be required to complete a health education community presentation on a topic chosen by the target audience. 2 S.H.

 

PT-748. Pharmacology. This course provides the student with knowledge concerning pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacotherapeutic principles, adverse effects, and interactions with medications commonly used with individuals in inpatient and outpatient settings. Student recognition of adverse effects and the influence of medications and natural remedies on function is emphasized with problem solving regarding communication with the individual and their health care providers and modifying the physical therapy program.  Pharmacological content is also covered in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological, and musculoskeletal portions of the curriculum.1 s.h.

 

PT-749. Healthcare Delivery. This course introduces students to various health care systems, legal and ethical issues affecting the delivery of health services, regulation of health care systems, and payment policy.  2 s.h.

 

PT-751. Integumentary Physical Therapy. This course is designed to provide student physical therapists to effectively examine and treat individuals with integumentary impairments.  2 s.h.

 

PT-752. Motor Development. Motor Development  explores normal development of gross motor, fine motor, language, self care, cognition, psychosocial, and play skills across the lifespan from in utero to young adulthood.  The course concentrates on embryology, introductory genetics, development of head control, trunk control, transitional movements, upright standing postures, and typical gross motor skills of children birth through young adulthood. Opportunities will be provided to experience and analyze gross motor development and movements in young children. Cultural considerations affecting motor development of children will also be reviewed. Discussion of motor development and recovery topics related to infants and children born prematurity, cardiac defect, arthrogryposis, myelomeningocele, and plagiocephaly will be introduced. 2 s.h.

 

PT-755. Neuromuscular I. This course is the first of two major courses that will provide students with a solid foundation in the examination of and interventions for individuals with neuromuscular disorders. The emphasis in this course will be on examination using the ICF framework emphasizing objective outcomes and evidence based interventions. Both traditional and contemporary models of neurological rehabilitation will be presented and the application of an integrated model will be emphasized. Lectures and discussions will utilize case studies to integrate information and enhance the development of clinical problem solving skills and translating evidence based practice into clinical practice. Psychosocial issues and their impact on patient outcomes will be discussed and volunteer patients and families will present the psychosocial aspects of their personal experiences. 3 s.h.

 

PT-755L. Neuromuscular I Lab. The emphasis in this course will be on examination using the ICF framework emphasizing objective outcomes and evidence based interventions. Application of an integrated model along with translating evidence into clinical practice will be emphasized and practiced on live patients. Volunteer patients and patient simulations will be utilized in lab sessions to promote the application of skills to real life situations. Psychosocial issues and their impact on patient outcomes will be discussed and volunteer patients and families will present the psychosocial aspects of their personal experiences. 3 s.h.

 

PT-756L. Neuromuscular II Lab. This course will focus on the physical therapy evaluation using the ICF framework related to chronic progressive neurological disorders and spinal cord injuries. Specific objective outcomes and translation of evidence based practice will be emphasized throughout the course. Labs will include patient interactions for patients with both spinal cord injury and a variety of progressive neuromuscular disorders to allow students to apply the information emphasized in lecture and lab. Psychosocial issues and their impact on patient outcomes will be discussed and volunteer patients and families will present the psychosocial aspects of their personal experiences. 2 s.h.

 

PT-756. Neuromuscular II. This course is the second of two major courses that will provide students with a solid foundation in the examination of and interventions for individuals with neuromuscular disorders. This course will focus on the physical therapy evaluation using the ICF framework related to chronic progressive neurological disorders and spinal cord injuries. Specific objective outcomes and translation of evidence based practice will be emphasized throughout the course. Lectures and discussions will utilize case studies to integrate information and enhance the development of clinical problem solving skills. Psychosocial issues and their impact on patient outcomes will be discussed and volunteer patients and families will present the psychosocial aspects of their personal experiences.3 s.h.

 

PT-760. Pediatrics. The pediatrics lecture course examines the etiology, impairments, evaluations, and evidence-based treatment interventions of children with disability across the life span. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health will serve as the framework for lectures to enhance the development of clinical reasoning skills. 3 s.h.

 

PT-760L. Pediatrics Laboratory. Pediatrics Lab offers a variety of demonstrations and hands-on clinical experiences related to pediatric physical therapy evaluations and evidenced-based treatment interventions for children with disabilities. It will serve to complement the pediatric didactic content. 1 s.h.

 

PT-761. Practice Management. This course introduces students to the following topics: current concepts and principles of management, development of a business plan for a new program/service, human resource management, and reimbursement updates. The goals of this course are to enhance understanding and facilitate development of professional and managerial skills necessary to function effectively as a member of a health care team.

 

PT-762L. Clin Reason/Practice Lab. This course emphasizes clinical reasoning and problem solving, through the presentation and discussion of progressive patient/client case studies with complex, multifactorial problems. Lecture and laboratory sessions assist in student preparation for the comprehensive examinations. Successful completion of both an online, multiple choice comprehensive curricular examination and a comprehensive Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) are required. 1 s.h.

 

PT-764. Evidence Based Practice I. The purpose of the evidence based practice (EBP) sequence in the Division of Physical Therapy is to provide students with the requisite skills to become consumers of the rehabilitation literature and upon completion of the program to apply the best available evidence to clinical practice.  EBP I will introduce topics related to research philosophy, research design, basic statistics, and psychometric properties of research.  The course will heavily revolve around practical examples from the physical rehabilitation literature as well as ongoing research within the College of Health Professions.  Student competency will be assessed via completion of class projects and written examinations.  1s,h

 

PT-765. Evidence Based Practice II. The purpose of the evidence based practice (EBP) sequence in the Division of Physical Therapy is to provide students with the requisite skills to become consumers of the rehabilitation literature and upon completion of the program to apply the best available evidence to clinical practice. EBP II will continue this sequence by reviewing selected statistical topics related to error, power, statistical design, parametric and non-parametric measures, and tests of group differences. EBP II will also review analyses of correlation and regression, as well as introduce students to the systematic review. The course will heavily revolve around practical examples from the physical rehabilitation literature as well as ongoing research within the College of Health Professions. Student competency will be assessed via completion of class projects and written examinations. 1 S.H.

 

PT-766. Evidence Based Practice III. This course requires students to review, discuss, rank, and critique peer reviewed journal articles related to research topics that have the potential to influence clinical decision-making in physical therapy. Students will use the literature as a tool to develop skills in the application of evidence-based practice with emphasis placed on determining the quality of the science and its presentation in the literature. The ultimate goal of this course is to ensure that students will be efficient and effective at analyzing the research literature in order to maximize the use of scientific evidence for clinical decision-making. 1 S.H.

 

PT-767. Evidence Based Practice IV. This course culminates the evidence-based practice curriculum and involves a final project illustrating proficiency with the collection, interpretation, and presentation of data. The course will involve classroom work to develop collection and presentation skills, and the final project will be an independently prepared case report to be completed during a clinical practicum.  The final project must include the selection of appropriate outcome measures and their publis.h.ed psychometric properties, evaluation of the patient at least at initial evaluation and discharge, presentation of the interventions, and a discussion of the results.  The posters will be developed with faculty mentoring during the clinical practicum and will be formally presented to the faculty upon return to campus. 1 s.h.

 

PT-768. Special Topics in Physical Therapy. This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore a specialized area of interest in physical therapy education, research, and/or clinical practice.  1-3 var. s.h.